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Attention for Distraction: Modernity, Modernism and Perception

W orks cited Alphen, Ernst van. “Figurations of Self: Modernism and Distraction.” Modernism. Vol. 2. Ed. Astradur Eysteinson and Vivian Liska. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2007. 339–46. Print. Armstrong, Tom. Modernism, Technology and the Body . Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998. Print. Baer, Ulrich. Remnants of Song: Trauma and the Experience of Modernity in Charles Baudelaire and Paul Celan . Stanford: Stanford UP, 2001. Print. Bal, Mieke. Emma and Edvard Looking Sideways: Loneliness and the Cinematic . Oslo: Munch Museum, 2017. Print

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Ueno Park during Meiji Times – a Mirror of its Time: Discursive Space and Symbolic Representation of Modernity

Fukaya, Katsumi 深谷克己. “ Edojidai gohan no bunka ” 江戸時代後半の文化 [Culture during the second half of the Edo period], nd. Waseda University Web site. http://www.f.waseda.jp/fky0/edo3.html , accessed June 2006 Giddens, Anthony. The Consequences of Modernity . Cambridge: Polity Press, 1990 Hall, John Whitney. Das Japanische Kaiserreich . Frankfurt a. Main: Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, 1994 Hashizume, Shin’ya 橋爪紳也. Nihon no hakurankai . Terashita Tsuyoshi korrekushon 日本の博 覧会。寺下勍 コッレクション[Japanese industrial fairs. The Terashita Tsuyoshi collection

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On Unruly Text, or Text-Trickster: Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony as Healing

-Tribal Epics: The Native American Novel Between Tradition and Modernity . Lewinston: Edwin Mellen, 1996. Print. Morgan, Winifred. The Trickster Figure in American Literature . New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. Print. Nelson, Robert M. Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Ceremony”: The Recovery of Tradition . New York: Peter Lang, 2008. Print. Nelson, Robert M. “The Function of the Landscape of Ceremony. ” Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Ceremony.” A Casebook . Ed. Allan Chavkin. New York: Oxford UP, 2002. 139–74. Print. Owens, Louis. Other Destinies: Understanding

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Wawel Meets Elsinore. The National and Universal Aspects of Stanisław Wyspiański’s Vision of Shakespeare’s Hamlet

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to show the role, the possibilities and the limits of Wyspiański’s national thinking through Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Of particular importance, in this context, is the role the Ghost takes in Wyspiański’s celebrated interpretation of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. By the Ghost we mean the spirit of history, the ghost of a father, the spirit of the fatherland, the voice of the ancestors, and particularly that of the Polish king Casimir the Great, as well as the Holy Ghost and the Evil Spirit because all these aspects of the Ghost belong to Wyspiański’s vision. The play in question bears witness to what the Polish poet calls “the truth of other worlds,” as well as the truth of the theatre, which Wyspiański calls the labyrinth. The poet manages to reduce, to some extent, this difficult truth to the truth of the world he cared most about, that is the present and historical reality of Poland, more specifically the city of Cracow, known as Poland’s spiritual, that is “ghostly,” and only virtual, capital. It is also remarkable that Wyspiański saw the Ghost in Hamlet in the context of other Shakespearean ghosts, apparitions and magicians, such as those that appear in Macbeth, The Tempest, Julius Caesar, A Midsummer Night’s Dream or Richard III. At the same time, Wyspiański realizes that the Ghost, with its irrationalism, offends the spirit of post-medieval times, and as such, is understandably neglected by Hamlet, who for Wyspiański, in anticipation of Harold Bloom, stands for modernity.

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The Shortest Way to Modernity Is via the Margins: J.H. Prynne’s Later Poetry

References “Arraign.” Oxford Concise English Dictionary . 10th ed. 1999. Print. Bartczak, Kacper. Świat nie scalony . Wrocław: Biuro Literackie, 2009. Print. Bradshaw, David. “Eugenics: ‘They Should Certainly be Killed.’” A Concise Companion to Modernism . Ed. David Bradshaw. London: Blackwell, 2005. 34-55. Print. Calinescu, Matei. Faces of Modernity: Avant-Garde, Decadence, Kitsch . Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1977. Print. Corcoran, Neil. English Poetry Since 1940

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Jürgen Habermas’s postconventional constractarianism as cosmopolitan constitutionalism

Citizens. Filozofia Publiczna i Edukacja Demokratyczna / Public Philosophy & Democratic Education III(2). 57-68. Habermas, Jürgen. 1984. The Theory of Communicative Action . Vol. I: Reason and the Rationalization of Society , transl. Thomas McCarthy. Boston: Beacon Press. Habermas, Jürgen. 1996. Postscript to Between Facts and Norms . In Deflen, Mathieu (ed.), Habermas, Modernity and Law . London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi: SAGE Publications. Habermas, Jürgen. 1998. Reply to Symposium Participants, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. William Rehg

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Body, Sensuousness, Eros and the New Aesthetic Order from Schiller to Rushdie

Abstract

In the present article, I look into the culture-building power of Eros from Schiller’s ideas of “the aesthetic state of mind” in Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man, through the Pre-Raphaelites’ eroticism to the nineteenthcentury fin de siècle aestheticized homoeroticism and beyond. I argue that eroticism is a reaction to the increasing sense of alienation brought about by bourgeois modernity. The “moments” and texts used to illustrate the thesis that eroticism shaped an alternative order are far from exhausting a very large list which could add nuances to the argument. The body is one of the essential aspects tackled, since eroticism cannot be conceived in its absence. The body may be an object of desire around which imagination weaves its yarn, or a blank page to be inscribed, or a danger zone, or a hypertrophied space projected by the lover’s longing for fusion. Eroticism in Salman Rushdie’s novels is the focus of my approach after a survey of some landmarks of erotic imagination. I argue that his novels are a new stage of the imagination infused by Eros. The article probes into how two centuries of aesthetic modernity have been shaped by the reality principle proposed by Schiller and how that essentially erotic model has suffered changes in time.

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The Poet's "Caressive Sight": Denise Levertov's Transactions with Nature

The Poet's "Caressive Sight": Denise Levertov's Transactions with Nature

The scientific consciousness which broke with the holistic perception of life is credited with "unweaving the rainbow," or disenchanting the world. No longer perceived as sacred, the non-human world of plants and animals became a site of struggle for domination and mastery in implementing humankind's supposedly divine mandate to subdue the earth. The nature poetry of Denise Levertov is an attempt to reverse this trend, reaffirm the sense of wonder inherent in the world around us, and reclaim some "holy presence" for the modern sensibility. Her exploratory poetics witnesses to a sense of relationship existing between all creatures, both human and non-human. This article traces Levertov's "transactions with nature" and her evolving spirituality, inscribing her poetry within the space of alternative—or romantic—modernity, one that dismantles the separation paradigm. My intention throughout was to trace the way to a religiously defined faith of a person raised in the modernist climate of suspicion, but keenly attentive to spiritual implications of beauty and open to the epiphanies of everyday.

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the Guillotine, and Modern Ontological Anxiety

Abstract

This essay begins by examining the rhetorical significance of the guillotine, an important symbol during the Romantic Period. Lacefield argues that the guillotine symbolized a range of modern ontological juxtapositions and antinomies during the period. Moreover, she argues that the guillotine influenced Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein through Giovanni Aldini, a scientist who experimented on guillotined corpses during the French Revolution and inspired Shelley’s characterization of Victor Frankenstein. Given the importance of the guillotine as a powerful metaphor for anxieties emergent during this period, Lacefield employs it as a clue signaling a labyrinth of modern meanings embedded in Shelley’s novel, as well as the films they anticipated. In particular, Lacefield analyzes the significance of the guillotine slice itself—the uneasy, indeterminate line that simultaneously separates and joins categories such as life/death, mind/body, spirit/matter, and nature/technology.

Lacefield’s interdisciplinary analysis analyzes motifs of decapitation/dismemberment in Frankenstein and then moves into a discussion of the novel’s exploration of the ontological categories specified above. For example, Frankenstein’s Creature, as a kind of cyborg, exists on the contested theoretical “slice” within a number of antinomies: nature/tech, human/inhuman (alive/dead), matter/spirit, etc. These are interesting juxtapositions that point to tensions within each set of categories, and Lacefield discusses the relevance of such dichotomies for questions of modernity posed by materialist theory and technological innovation. Additionally, she incorporates a discussion of films that fuse Shelley’s themes with appeals to twentieth-century and post-millennium audiences.

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Recalling All the Olympians: W. B. Yeats’s “Beautiful Lofty Things,” On the Boiler and the Agenda of National Rebirth

Abstract

While it has been omitted by numerous critics in their otherwise comprehensive readings of Yeats’s oeuvre, “Beautiful Lofty Things” has been placed among the mythical poems, partly in accordance with Yeats’s own intention; in a letter to his wife, he suggested that “Lapis Lazuli, the poem called ‘To D. W.’ ‘Beautiful Lofty Things,’ ‘Imitated from the Japanese’ & ‘Gyres’ . . . would go well together in a bunch.” The poem has been inscribed in the Yeats canon as registering a series of fleeting epiphanies of the mythical in the mundane. However, “Beautiful Lofty Things,” evocative of a characteristically Yeatsian employment of myth though it certainly is, seems at the same time to fuse Yeats’s quite earthly preoccupations. It is here argued that the poem is organized around a tightly woven matrix of figures that comprise Yeats’s idea of the Irish nation as a “poetical culture.” Thus the position of the lyric in the poet’s oeuvre deserves to be shifted from periphery towards an inner part of his cultural and political ideas of the time. Indeed, the poem can be viewed as one of Yeats’s central late comments on the state of the nation and, significantly, one in which he is able to proffer a humanist strategy for developing a culturally modern state rather than miring his argument in occasionally over-reckless display of abhorrence of modernity

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