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Death and Violence in Contemporary Theatre, Drama, and Novel (Oliver Frljić, Anja Hilling, Simona Semenič, and G. W. Sebald)

Verlag, 2011. Lehmann, Hans-Thies. “Politično v postdramskem.” Prev. Anina Marn. Maska , 17, ¾ (2002): 6–9. McCulloh, Mark Richard. Understanding W.G. Sebald . Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 2003. Pezdirc-Bartol, Mateja. “Vloga bralca v poglavitnih literarnoteoretičnih smereh 20. Stoletja.” Jezik in slovstvo , 45, 5 and 6 (2000): 195–206 and 243–252. Robertson, Roland. “Glocalization: Time – Space and Homogeneity – Heterogeneity.” In Global Modernities , ed. M. Featherstone et. al. London: Sage Publications

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A multidimensional analysis of spatial order in public spaces: a case study of the town Morąg, Poland

members of the local community. In small towns, elderly people account for a large part of the local population. Senior residents dislike change, external intervention and signs of modernity, which contributes to the popularity of public spaces with a more conventional character ( Zemło, 2011 ). 1.2 Revitalisation of public spaces Revitalisation is the economic, social and environmental revival of towns and cities. During this process, old functions are recreated and new functions are introduced to dilapidated urban areas, districts and landscapes. The aim of

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History and Modernity in Artistic Education from Romania

Abstract

The issue of artistic education is not new, it is still concerned and concerned by many specialists. The newities emerged and imposed from time to time in the evolution of culture and education were and are determined by the scientific and artistic achievements, the enrichment of the possibilities of knowledge and valorization of the experiences and achievements, both from the field of artistic didactics, as well as from musical creation and interpretative art. The perspectives, especially in the last half century, aimed at increasing the knowledge of the child’s physical and mental peculiarities, his ability to form audiences, visions and chinestecs, and the fundamental aims pursued by specialists - teachers and researchers - have been and have continued to improve the contributions of music, literature and dance to the aesthetic and ethical education of children, to developing their sensitivity and intelligence, in other words, to the formation and harmonious development of the children’s personality. From the perspective of knowing and preserving the national identity, in the non-formal educational system existing in Romania, there are musical-literarychoreographic circles with folkloric specifics organized in the Children’s Clubs and Palaces. Also, through school curriculum (CDS), there are initiatives by music education teachers to capitalize on music-literary-choreographic folklore through new disciplines, giving pupils the knowledge of local, regional and national traditions.

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Counterfactuality as a Polyphonic Assemblage. Entangled Human and Nonhuman Stories of Early Modern Sciences in Neal Stephenson’s The Baroque Cycle

Summary

In recent science-fiction literature, we can witness a proliferation of new counterfactual narratives which take the 17th century as their point of departure. Unlike steampunk narratives, however, their aim is not to criticise the socio-political effects caused by contemporary technological development. Such authors as Neal Stephenson or Ian Tregillis, among others, are interested in revisiting the model of development in Western societies, routing around the logic of progress. Moreover, they demonstrate that modernity is but an effect of manifold contingent and indeterminate encounters of humans and nonhumans and their distinct temporalities. Even the slightest modification of their ways of being could have changed Western societies and cultures. Thus, they necessitate a rather non-anthropocentric model of counterfactuality which is not tantamount to the traditional alternative histories which depart from official narratives of the past.

By drawing on contemporary multispecies ethnography, I put forward a new understanding of counter-factuality which aims to reveal multiple entangled human and nonhuman stories already embedded in the seemingly unified history of the West. In this context, the concept of “polyphonic assemblage” (Lowenhaupt-Tsing) is employed to conceptualize the contingent and open-ended encounters of human and nonhuman historical actors which cut across different discourses and practices. I analyse Stephenson’s The Baroque Cycle to show the entangled stories of humans and nonhumans in 17th century sciences, hardly present in traditional historiographies. In particular, Stephenson’s depiction of quicksilver and coffeehouse as nonhuman historical actors is scrutinized to show their vital role in the production of knowledge at the dawn of modernity.

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Dislocation: The Conflict of Photographic and Cinematographic Representations of War in Soviet Lithuania

Summary

The Cold War that shaped the societies of late modernity had penetrated everyday life with constant messages about the nuclear threat and demonstrations of military power. On the one hand, Soviet republics such as Lithuania were occupied by the enemy of Western democracies, and the nuclear threat would apply to their territory as well. On the other hand, many people secretly sided with the West. But information about the world behind the Iron Curtain was filtered ideologically. Images of Vietnam War and civil unrest in Western countries were broadcasted by the state controlled media as a counterpoint to the orderly and optimistic Soviet life idealised in chronicles and photographs. This positive image was shown to rest on the victory of the Great Patriotic War as well as October Revolution. Those events were represented by iconic monuments in the public space as well as by memorialization rituals taking place every half-year. Their visual documentation was an important part of Soviet culture. Photo journalists like Ilja Fišeris were assigned to record the parades of May the 1st, the 9th and November the 7th. Art photographers treated such images as a tribute to authorities exchanged for a measure of artistic freedom. But in the 1980s, the memorialization rituals, the monuments and other ideological signs became the focus of “rogue” art photographers and cinematographers: Artūras Barysas-Baras, Vytautas Balčytis, Vitas Luckus, Alfonsas Maldutis, Algirdas Šeškus, Remigijus Pačėsa and Gintaras Zinkevičius. Their ironic and reflective images worked as dislocating counter-memorials against the stale reconstructions of the past. Referring to theories of Svetlana Boym, Verónica Tello and Ariella Azoulay, the paper discusses the complicated relationships between the different memorializations of war, including the absence of the Holocaust in collective memory.

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Messianism and UFO Sightings as Counterfactual Strategies of Enchantment of the World

References Angelucci, Orfeo. The Secret of the Saucers , ed. Ray Palmer, Amherst Press, 1955. Barkun, Michael. A Culture of Conspiracy. Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America . Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. Beck, Ulrich. Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity , transl. by Mark Ritter (Sage Publications 1992). Bielik-Robson, Agata. Duch powierzchni. Rewizja roman-tyczna i filozofia . Kraków: Universitas, 2004. Bielik-Robson, Agata. „Syndrom romantyczny: Stanisław Brzozowski i rewizja romantyzmu” Słupskie

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M. K. Čiurlionis and St. Petersburg: New Facts Concerning his Painting Black Sun

. Craft, Robert. 100 years on: Igor Stravinsky on The Rite of Spring. 2013. In: The Times Literary Supplement. [Viewed on 2013-06-19]. Access via the Internet: http://www.the-tls.co.uk/tls/public/article1275660.ece. Craft, Robert. Stravinsky: Discoveries and Memories [Kindle Version]. 2013. [Viewed on 2013-06-25]. Access via the Internet: http://www.amazon.co.jp. Danuser, Hermann, Heidy Zimmermann & Paul Sacher Stiftung. Avatar of modernity: “The Rite of Spring” reconsidered. Basel: Paul Sacher Foundation; London: Boosey & Hawkes, 2013

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9. The Concept of Nature and Its Applications in the Legal, Musical and Educational Fields

References 1. Allain, Y.M. & Christiany J. (2006). L'art des jardins en Europe . Paris: Citadelles and Mazenod 2. Annas, J. (1993). The Morality of Happiness . New York: Oxford University Press 3. Aquinas, T. (1988). Summa Theologica , trans. Fathers of the English Dominican Province, Hackett Publishing Co., Indianapolis, I-II, Q. 77, A. 2 4. Begbie J. (2013). Music, Modernity, and God. Essays in Listening , Oxford: Oxford University Press 5. Cohen, H.F. (1984). Quantifying Music. The Science of Music at the First Stage of the

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3. Similarities Across the Centuries: A Comparison Between Two Vocal Works by Barbara Strozzi and Peter Maxwell Davies

Wendy (1999), ‘Tacitus Incognito: Opera as History in L’incoronazione di Poppea’, Journal of the American Musicological Society, 52(1), 39-96. 11. Kelly William (2003), Art and Humanist Ideals: Contemporary Perspectives, Macmillan Art Publishing, South Yarra. 12. Luke Timothy W. (1990), Social Theory and Modernity: Critique, Dissent and Revolution, Sage Publications, Newbury Park. 13. Mercure de France (1734), ‘Lettre de M*** à Mlle*** sur l’origine de la musique’, May 1734, 868-870. 14. Milizia Francesco

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