Search Results

1 - 9 of 9 items :

  • "life quality" x
  • Basic Medical Science, other x
Clear All
Sleep coaching: non-pharmacological treatment of non-restorative sleep in Austrian railway shift workers

Abstract

Sleep coaching by Holzinger & Klösch™ is a new, Gestalt therapy-based holistic approach to non-pharmacological treatment of non-restorative sleep. It includes psychotherapeutic aspects which enable participants to improve their sleep quality by developing their own coping strategies as a daily routine. Dream work and relaxation techniques are also part of the programme. The aim of this study was to measure the effectiveness of a two-day sleep coaching seminar on sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and work and life quality in shift workers employed in an Austrian railway company (Österreichische Bundesbahnen, ÖBB). Thirty shift workers (28 male; mean age=24±45.90, age range 24–56 years) answered the same survey before and six months after the seminar (baseline and follow-up) containing items of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), their chronotype, personality factors, and burnout risk factors. The baseline findings in this group were compared with those of non-completers (who did not take the follow-up survey) (N=154) to see if the two groups differed significantly enough to create a bias among completers (who took the follow-up survey as well). Groups differed significantly in burnout levels as well as sleep duration, but not in the distribution of critical PSQI and ESS values. The two-day sleep coaching seminar resulted in a significant improvement in total PSQI score and subjective sleep quality and in a significant reduction in diurnal fatigue, sleep latency, and daytime sleepiness. Nevertheless, more research with a larger sample and a longitudinal design is needed to establish the long-term effects of sleep coaching.

Open access
Effects of Cyp2c19 and P2y12 Gene Polymorphisms on Clinical Results of Patients Using Clopidogrel After Acute Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease

Abstract

The CY2C19 and P2Y12 gene polymorphisms are responsible for resistance to clopidogrel, known as drug unresponsiveness. In this study we researched the effect of gene polymorphism on clinical results of patients who began clopidogrel therapy after acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

The study included 51 patients. The patient group included patients who had begun prophylactic clopidogrel due to acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the last 2 years. All patients were monitored by the Neurology Outpatient Clinic at Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart Üniversity Research Hospital, Çanakkale, Turkey, and only those monitored for at least 1 year were included in the study.

When the *1, *2 and *3 alleles of the CYP2C19 gene polymorphism were evaluated, two patients were homozygotes for *2/*2, 13 patients were heterozygous for *1/*2 and 36 patients were homozygotes for the wild type *1/*1. No patient had the *3 allele. Three heterozygous patients, one for *2/*2 and two for *1/*2, stopped clopidogrel therapy due to repeated strokes and began taking warfarin. When evaluating P2Y12 52 (G>T) and 34 (C>T) polymorphisms, all alleles were of the wild type.

The CYP2C19 and P2Y12 gene polymorphisms may cause recurring strokes linked to insufficient response to treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. In our patient group, three patients suffered repeated strokes and these patients had the CYP2C19*2 gene polymorphism. As a result, before medication use, genetic testing is important for human life, quality of life and economic burden.

Open access
Workplace Mobbing

Workplace Mobbing

Workplace mobbing is a hostile and unethical communication, systematically aimed from one or more individuals towards mostly one individual, who are forced into a helpless position and are held in it by constant bullying. This article describes some of the most important characteristics of mobbing: offensive behaviour, organizational and non-organizational causes of this behaviour, the victim, and the consequences. Modern business environment is complex, dynamic, volatile, and requires better ability to adjust. Constant changes are a part of organizational reality, but they also produce an ideal environment for all kinds of conflicts. Conflicts are inevitable in every organization, but the task of its management is to identify them and resolve before they affect the workforce, productivity, and costs. The idea is to avert psychological abuse and aberrant behaviour such as mobbing that may cause physical and mental disorders. Mobbing is a problem of the modern society; as a violation of human rights it is relatively new and unrecognised in Croatia. Abuse is mostly psychological; it affects the victim's health and life, quality of work, productivity, profitability, and may lead to significant economic losses in the community. Mobbing can be averted by joint forces that would involve employees and management, medical and legal professionals, and even community as a whole. The more an organization pursues excellence based on trust and business ethics, the higher the probability that mobbing will be averted or stopped.

Open access
Genetic analyses of the NF1 gene in Turkish neurofibromatosis type I patients and definition of three novel variants

dysplasia is one of the most serious clinical finding restricting the life quality of children with NF1. Pathogenic variants found in this study were different for each family although there are a number of studies reporting some recurrent mutation hotspots for the NF1 gene [ 29 , 30 ]. Terzi et al . [ 31 ] suggested screening the entire coding exons of the NF1 gene for genetic analysis as a result of their study reporting a novel and two known NF1 gene mutations in a cohort of 100 Turkish NF1 patients using a targeted resequencing method for screening recurrent

Open access
Kinematic quantification of straight-punch techniques using the preferred and non-preferred fist in taekwon-do

. Hylchuk Y., Andreichuk O., Pantik V., Tsymbaliuk S. (2017) Physical and mental health components condition in the life quality of students who regularly practice kickboxing and yoga. Phys. Activ. Rev ., 5: 37-43. DOI: 10.16926/par.2017.05.06. 10. Kalina R.M. (2000) Teoria sportów walki [in Polish]. Warszawa: Centralny Ośrodek Sportu. 11. Leite W.S.S. (2014) Competition versus nature: how the sport warps human character. Phys. Activ. Rev ., 2: 1-9. 12. Li S., Zhang Z., Wan B., Wilde B., Shan G. (2017) The relevance of body positioning and its training

Open access
Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with revision Total Stabilizer Prosthesis in a 66-year-old patient with secondary knee osteoarthritis and valgus deformity. Case Report

Abstract

Knee osteoarthritis (gonarthrosis) is the most prevalent knee pathology encountered nowadays in the third age population, leading to severe disability and reduced life quality. Secondary gonarthrosis may be caused by a traumatic event, which subjects the knee joint to a transitory highly increased mechanical stress, initiating a rapidly progressive degrading process of the articular cartilage and subjacent bone tissue. TKA is intended to replace all the intra-articular components with artificial parts, in order to relieve pain, compensate for ligament instability, correct deformities, and restore proper joint functionality. Semi-constrained, non-hinged implants are usually used for revision TKA, in knees that already had a primary TKA but sustained complications. Nevertheless, here we reported the case of a 66-year-old female patient diagnosed with posttraumatic gonarthrosis who underwent TKA with a revision total stabilizer implant as primary treatment due to severe joint instability and high grade valgus deviation. The outcome of the surgical procedure was positive, with significant pain relief and increased knee stability. The valgus angle was reduced from 37° to 4° and the KSS score increased from 3 to 87 points. Therefore, revision semi-constrained prosthesis may be used as a primary implant with promising result in severe cases.

Open access
Treading on tricky ground: reconstructive approaches to Charcot neuropathic arthropathy of the foot

Abstract

Introduction and purpose:Charcot neuroarthropathy defines a cluster of progressive lesions affecting the joints and bones, as well as the soft tissues of the foot in the context of diabetes, a pivotal role being attributed to peripheral neuropathy. Loss of sensation and proprioception, subsequent repeated trauma, muscle and autonomic nervous system impairment contribute to the alteration of the foot’s architecture and distribution of pressure, ultimately triggering ulceration and gangrene. The urge to avoid amputation has fueled the development of conservative and reconstructive techniques capable of delaying, if not preventing such negative outcomes. The purpose of this review was to present the most frequently used reconstruction procedures and the challenges arising in adapting them to particular foot morphologies and lesion stages. Methods:Literature search was conducted using PubMed, resulting in around 90 articles, multicenter studies and reviews, 26 of which were considered most relevant in providing the guidelines for orthopedic reconstruction and postoperative care in Charcot foot patients with diabetic neuropathy prevailing over arteriopathy. Results:The tarsometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints are most frequently affected. Closed reduction, arthrodesis, and tendon lengthening are key features of an efficient correction, alternatively accompanied by resections and tenotomies. Ulceration and callus debridement may also be necessary, while prolonged casting and immobilization remain obligatory. Conclusions:Most authors agree that stabilizing the deformities, optimizing the pressure on the soft tissues, and promoting the healing of potential lesions are the main purposes of the interventions. Prompt recognition and correction of Charcot foot deformities improve life quality and minimize the prospects of amputation.

Open access
Quality of life and functional fitness of the elderly

Quality of life and functional fitness of the elderly

Study aim: To assess the perceived life quality and functional fitness of elderly subjects.

Material and methods: Two groups of subjects, aged 70 - 92 years, were studied: residents of a nursing home (Group R; n = 53) and those attending daytime nursing homes (Group D; n = 76). The EuroQol 5D questionnaire, and Romberg's and The Fullerton Functional Fitness tests were applied.

Results: Subjects from Group D perceived their daily functioning and general feeling much higher than those from Group R. Group R seemed more homogenous in that respect than Group D since only in the former all three indices of the quality of life (daily functioning, general feeling and perceived health) were significantly intercorrelated (p<0.05 - 0.001).

Conclusions: Social aid for the elderly ought to be focused on stimulating them to be active instead of giving them a direct assistance only.

Open access
Quality of life, assertiveness, and personality dimensions in elderly men

treatment for elderly people with severe mental illness. BMC Psychiatry. 10:84. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-244X/10/84 McCrae R.R. (1993) Moderated Analyses of Longitudinal Personality Stability. J.Pers.Soc.Psychol., 65:577–585. Rowe J.W., R.L.Kahn (1997) Successful ageing. Gerontologist, 4:433–440. Olvasztóné B.Zs., J.Bognár, L.J.Herpainé, P.J.Kopkáné, K.M.Vécseyné (2011) A survey of the living conditions and life quality of elderly people. Educatio Artis Gymnasticae, 2: 3

Open access