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Neuroscience as a Basis for Innovations in Education

Abstract

We live in a time in which a “revolution” in education is occurring. Through brain research and technology, we have unlocked many of the reasons why some children experience so much difficulty in learning. We know more about effective teaching practices than at any other time in history. Through technological advances, we have a whole world as our resource base. In addition, teachers are finally being empowered to make choices that affect their classrooms.

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Creativity in Organizational Environment

. Eisenberger, R. (1996). Detrimental Effects of Reward: Reality or Myth? American Psychologist, 51(11), 1153-1166. Ekvall, G. (1996). Organizational climate for creativity and innovation. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 5, 105-123. Ekvall, G. (1999). Creative Climate. In M.A. Runco & S.R. Pritzker, Encyclopedia of Creativity. Vol. 1. 403 - 412. San Diego: Elsevier. Fichnová, K. (2013). Psychology of creativity for marketing communication. Noailles: Association Amitié Franco

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Creation and Results of a Research Project with a Focus on School Management for Teachers

školských manažérov ako kľúčový predpoklad efektívnosti školy. Nitra: Pedagogická fakulta. Pisoňová, M. (2012). Osobnostný rozvoj riaditeľa školy - východiská a determinanty. Bratislava: Iura Edition. Pisoňová, M., Tóblová, E., & Nagyová, A. (2015). The Research and Annalysis within the Innovation of School Management Course. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences (ELSEVIER), 186. Porubská, G., & Ďurdiak, Ľ. (2005). Manažment vzdelávania dospelých. Nitra: SlovDidac. Prášilová, M. (2006). Vybrané kapitoly

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The School Culture Heritage of the Reformation

Abstract

On the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, this essay analyses those educational innovations in the history of central European education that were introduced by the Church reform in the 16th century, following these modernizations and their further developments through the spreading of the universal school systems in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Drawing examples from the innovations in the college culture of the period, the author emphasises that those pedagogical values established in the 16th century are not only valid today, but are exemplary from the point of view of contemporary education. From these the author highlights: pupils’ autonomy (in the form of various communities), cooperation with the teachers and school management and the relative pluralism of values.

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The Importance of Technical Education for the Development of Society

Abstract

After 1990, the Slovak Republic saw an emergence of a negative attitude towards technical education at primary schools. However, since the beginning of the 21st century the Government has been aware of the unfavourable development of technical education in Slovakia, and according to its autumn 2012 policy statement, it considered “education, science, research and innovation, information and digitization to be essential pillars of the knowledge-based society and economy”. This statement also indicated support for strengthening of education focused on natural sciences and engineering. One of its main preconditions would be innovation of educational programs at different levels of the educational system in accordance with the requirements of pedagogical practice and in line with current needs of the labour market. Therefore, it will support the education leading to the development of job skills of primary school pupils to ensure professional orientation of students, particularly at secondary vocational schools.

The importance of technical education for the overall development of children is discussed in relation to the preparation of students to study at secondary vocational schools. A successful completion of topics in the subject of Technology at primary schools (PS) is a prerequisite for an easier transition of pupils to secondary vocational schools.

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The Replication of the System of Conductive Education in the United States

Abstract

During the 1980s, the methodology of Hungarian-created conductive education began its innovation in becoming an international model for working with individuals with physical disabilities. Its prevalence has increased around the world ever since. These international interests stimulated efforts to develop ways in which the discipline of conductive education (CE) could occur abroad and as a result, develop a worldwide network of practice. In the United States the first establishment of this international model of conductive education occurred in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Under the professional supervision of the András Pető Institute of Conductive Education and College for Conductor Training, (MPANNI in Hungarian), the Conductive Learning Center (CLC) was established in 1999, enrolling students to participate in the conductive education model and also serving as the laboratory school for the Aquinas College (AQ) teacher preparation program for earning the endorsement to teach the Physically and Otherwise Health Impaired (POHI). Currently, this collaborative program at AQ provided with MPANNI is unique in North America.

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Philosophical, Aesthetic, Psychological and Pedagogical Aspects

Abstract

Introduction: Computers and the applications of today’s high technology can simulate reality so realistically that virtuality has become part of both children’s and adults’ lifestyles (Nagy & Kölcsey, 2017; Szécsi, 2012). However, it did not emerge with the computer applications, but with human thinking and part of that, the virtual conception of the world. In addition to social changes this development can be observed on individuals as well.

Purpose: This study shows the development of virtuality through the examples of cultural, philosophical, aesthetic, then the psychological and pedagogical development of the individual with the help of some important studies.

Methods: This study presents the social and individual development of virtuality throughout theoretical analysis of the research results.

Conclusion: Virtuality has already an important role in the technological and economic sphere and its impact on social innovations, individual and social life can be felt as well. Virtuality-research, its application and improvement contribute to experience a more complete reality and to the improvement of human life quality.

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Civic Engagement and Environmental Sustainability in Teaching and Learning at Higher Education Institution in South Africa

(3), 183-188(6). Reilly, S., Petrillo, H., & Demchik, M. (2008). Environmental Education’s Role in Sustainable Development: Three Case Studies from India, South Africa and the United States. Retrieved from www.uwsp.edu/forestry/StuJournals/Documents/IRM/Reilly.pdf Rhodes University Academic Departments (BICC, 2016a). Biotechnology Innovation Centre. Retrieved from https://www.ru.ac.za/media/rhodesuniversity/content/registrar/documents/prospectus/department%20biotech%20innovation%20centre.pdf Rhodes University Biotechnology

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Comparison of Teachers’ Opinions on Inspections

Abstract

Introduction: The quality of school depends on a well-functioning school management, managed by the top school managers. It is very important to know the real conditions of the school to be able to provide any effective changes. Especially, it is necessary to know the educational process which can be efficiently determined by an inspection process. The inspection process is present in current pedagogical science and in pedagogical practice which deserves increased attention of all participants in the educational process.

Methods: The study is based on a theoretical analysis of the presented issues and on a research. The findings were analysed, compared, and conclusions were drawn for school practice. We used the following research methods:

- content analysis of the existing literature;

- the quantitative method of gathering data by the medium of a twelve-item questionnaire containing four closed and eight semi-open questions. The questionnaire contained data necessary to process and evaluate the questionnaire, these were inserted as the last question;

- statistical data processing methods.

Results: New times bring a new style of management and a new understanding of the inspecting activity, which creates a partnership between the student and the teacher. It is to promote mutual understanding between them, based on the principles of democracy. Innovations in the educational practice also affect the realization of inspecting activities. The aim of managers, as well as inspectors, is to promote inspections not only as a tool for evaluating the teaching process but also as methodological help for teachers. The goal of our research was to map the state of the inspecting activity in selected high schools and to find out about the changes in teachers’ opinions on inspecting activities over the twenty-year horizon. We cannot generalize our findings for schools of all kinds as only 88 respondents (44 respondents participated in the 1998 research and 44 respondents in the 2017 research) took part in our research.

Discussion: Managing the educational process and taking the responsibility for its quality are among the basic duties of the school management and in the conditions of the Slovak Republic, as it follows from Act no. 596/2003 on state administration in education and school self-government as last amended. Supervising school leadership is one of the fundamental means of feedback that allows the study of the level of educational and training results, the fulfillment of the conceptual development of school, and the fulfillment of the tasks in the short-term school plan. The objective of the principal of the school is to obtain objective information about the level and the outcomes of the educational work of the school and, if deficiencies are identified, it is his/her duty to eliminate them. The most important task of the school is to implement the School Educational Program in line with the State Educational Program (SEP), which should take into account the needs of students, the interests of students and their parents, and contribute to improving the processes going on in the school, especially in the educational process. The research revealed that inspections conducted by school managers (the principal, deputies, administrators) are the most beneficial for the work of teachers. This fact was caused by the effort of the school managers to view inspections as a means of personal growth of teachers and not only as a controlling mechanism of teachers’ work. This was also confirmed by the research showing that inspections by the members of school management are now clearly focused on emphasizing the positive aspect of teachers’ work. This was caused by a shift in the inspectors’ perception of the inspecting activities in the period of twenty years - they use them as a teacher-oriented tool.

Limitations: The number of participants in the research sample was one of the methodological limitations of this research. We cannot consider this number to be representative for the purpose of generalizing the results.

Conclusion: In this study, we realized a mutual comparison of attitudes and opinions of teachers regarding inspecting activities. This comparative study, taking into account the twenty-year time span, has shown that the inspectors (school managers) have acquired such methods of evaluating their teachers, which objectively refer of their actual performance, that the most beneficial inspections for teachers’ own pedagogical work are the inspections conducted by the members of the school management, that the adherence to pedagogical ethics by the inspectors has an increasing tendency, and that formalism, as well as the subjective evaluation of teacher’s work, have a downward tendency and have disappeared from the conclusions of inspections. Based on the research results, it can be concluded that, in the course of two decades, significant changes have taken place in the realization of inspections, both on the part of the inspectors and on the part of the teachers and their perception of inspections.

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Fostering Internationalisation in Higher Education by Virtual Mobility

. VAN DER WENDE, M. (ed.). Virtual Mobility: New Technologies and the Internationalization of Higher Education. Hague, Netherlands: Organization for International Cooperation in Higher Education (NUFFIC), 1998. VMCOLAB: European Co-Laboratory for the Integration of Virtual Mobility in Higher Education Innovation and Modernisation Strategies. (Project ID: 527770-LLP-1-2012-1-BE-ERASMUS-ESMO). VRIENS, M., et al. Virtual mobility as an Alternative or Complement to Physical mobility. EDULEARN conference proceedings. Barcelona, Spain, 2010.

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