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Exploring factors related to college student expertise in digital games and their relationships to academics

recreational video game play on children’s and adolescents’ cognition. New Directions for Child & Adolescent Development , 139, 41-50. Bodill, K., & Roberts, L. D. (2013). Implicit theories of intelligence and academic locus of control as predictors of studying behaviour. Learning & Individual Differences , 27, 163-166. Chamorro-Premuzic, T., & Furnham, A. (2003). Personality predicts academic performance: Evidence from two longitudinal university samples. Journal of Research in Personality , 37(4), 319. Cheng, M.-T., & Annetta, L. (2012). Students

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Observations on the perspectives and limits of the evidence-based approach in the evaluation of gamification processes

References Andreoletti, M. (2010). Il videogioco. Questioni, tassonomie, similitudini. Rem. Ricerche su Educazione e Media, II(1), 81-103. Bruni, F. (2007). Identità in gioco, Journal of e-Learning and Knowledge Society, III(3), 29-37. Calvani, A. (2014). Per un’istruzione evidence-based. Analisi teorico-metodologica internazionale sulle didattiche efficaci e inclusive. Trento: Erickson. de Mul, J. (2005). The Game of Life: Narrative and Ludic Identity Formation in Computer Games. In J. Raessens

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Visuo-spatial attention and reading abilities: an action game prototype for dyslexic children

Abstract

The ability to play action videogames – not directly related to phonological or orthographic training – seems to be a teaching tool able to intervene specifically on spatial attention and drastically improve the reading skills of dyslexic children. The MADRIGALE project aims at the design and development of an action game, simultaneously involving both phonological and attention training in order to adapt educational game strategies for special needs.

Within the MADRIGALE project, the design of the prototype was presented at the International Conference on Intelligent Networking and Collaborative Systems, while an experimentation about educational effectiveness of the prototype, conducted using ‘Prove MT2’ as a benchmarking tool for measuring accuracy and speed of reading, was published in the International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET). This paper is an extension of the work presented in SIREM – SIEL 2014 Conference, and presents the results of a Game Evaluation Sheet administered to 50 primary school teachers with experience of dyslexic students

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The Development of Diorama Learning Media Transportation Themes to Develop Language Skill Children’s Group B

Abstract

Early Childhood is the beginning of basic skills development, and one such skill is the language skill. During this time, appropriate stimulus is required to assist the optimal development of children’s language skills, which includes the utilization of effective media learning in kindergarten. Field observation obtained by the researcher in Kindergarten PGRI 3 Tulusayu Tumpang Malang district showed that the only learning media currently used is in the form of visual utilities exhibited by the teacher and does not involve many children in the utilization. The purpose of this research and development is to produce an instructional media diorama that can be used as a language development tool for children in language skill group B. The learning media diorama is expected to help teachers to be more creative in using learning media as interactive game tools.

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The pedagogical concept of laboratory and videogames: learning by having fun

jeu. Jouer pour apprendre a vivre. Ris: Nathan. Hickman L.A. (2003). Johndewey.com: cosa sarebbe piaciuto e cosa no a Dewey di Internet. In Spadafora, G. (Ed.). John Dewey. Una nuova democrazia per il XXI secolo, Roma: Anicia. Iaquinta, T. (2005). La scuola laboratorio, Rende: Edizioni Scientifiche Calabresi. King, L. (2002). Game on: The History and Culture of Video Games. New York, NY: Universe. Malykhina, E. (2014). Fact or Fiction?: Video Games Are the Future of Education, Scientific American

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Virtual realities and education

References Abrash, M. (2016). Oculus Connect 3 opening keynote. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AtyE5qOB4gw. Annetta, L., Mangrum, J., Holmes, S., Collazo, K. & Meng-Tzu, C. (2009). Bridging realty [sic] to virtual reality: Investigating gender effect and student engagement on learning through video game play in an elementary school classroom. International Journal of Science Education, 31(8), 1091-1113. Arnab, S., Petridis, P., Dunwell, I., & de Freitas, S. (2011). Enhancing learning in

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Theoretical vocabularies and styles of explanation of robot behaviours in children

/paper/viewPDFInterstitial/1062/1398 Datteri, E., & Zecca, L. (2016). The Game of Science: An Experiment in Synthetic Roboethology with Primary School Children. IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine , 23(2), 24–29. http://doi.org/10.1109/MRA.2016.2533038 Levy, S. T., & Mioduser, D. (2008). Does it “want” or “was it programmed to...”? Kindergarten children’s explanations of an autonomous robot’s adaptive functioning. International Journal of Technology and Design Education , 18(4), 337–359. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-007-9032-6 Levy, S. T

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Children and Television: Vicarious Socialisation Experiences

Press. Mitrofan, O., Paul, M. & Spencer, N. (2009). Is aggression in children with behavioural and emotional difficulties associated with television viewing and video game playing? a systematic review. Child: Care, Health & Development , 35(1), 5-15. Morrison, M. (2012).Understanding methodology. In A.R. Briggs, M. Coleman & M. Morrison (Eds), Research Methods in Educational Leadership and Management . CA: Sage Publications. Olchondra, R.T. (2012). Children influence buying patterns, poll says. Retrieved from http://business.inquirer.net/61337

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