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Structure, conduct and performance paradigm in assessing travel agency performances

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to present and exemplify traditional and neoclassical approaches to market structure and tourism firm performance analysis. The paper tackles some of the industrial economic thinking trends which were meant to fill the gaps left by the traditional approaches. Two approaches stand out from among the industrial economic trends: SCP paradigm and game theory. The results show that the strategy tourism operators prefer is to practise high prices; however there is no certainty that the competitors would adhere to such an idea at the beginning or during the season.

Open access
Gamification as an instrument for organizational behaviour change during the meeting: case study «ROBATIEMPOS»

technology, people, and organizations towards a global society” - LECTURE NOTES IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND ORGANISATION (LNISO), Springer (R) Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. (1985). Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior Plenum Press. New York. Deterding, S., Dixon, D., Khaled, R., & Nacke, L. (2011, September). From game design elements to gamefulness: defining gamification. In Proceedings of the 15th international academic MindTrek conference: Envisioning future media environments (pp. 9-15). ACM. Gartner (2012) Gamification: engagement

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The Influence of European Cup Performances on Domestic Stadium Attendances in Romanian Football

-927. Coates, D., & Humphreys, B.R. (2012). Game attendance and outcome uncertainty in the National Hockey League. Journal of Sports Economics, 13(4), 364-377. Coates, D., Humphreys, B.R., & Zhou, L. (2014). Reference‐dependent preferences, loss aversion, and live game attendance. Economic Inquiry, 52(3), 959-973. Czarnitzki, D., & Stadtmann, G. (2002). Uncertainty of outcome versus reputation: Empirical evidence for the First German Football Division. Empirical Economics, 27(1), 101-112. Di Domizio, M. (2013). Football on TV

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Stop hitting the woodwork! CRM for better fan-identification in Romanian second division football clubs

Abstract

According to pundits, Romanian football is at an unprecedented low in terms of sporting quality and fan followship altogether. A mix of mismanagement and public regulations have transformed football clubs into under-financed organizations, unable to groom their academic work, raise quality players and, subsequently, perform at highest level which ultimately led to a decrease in entertainment on the pitch and of the numbers in attendance. Adding to this is the loss of brand identity that has created a rupture between clubs and their fan-bases. The paper aims to look at customer relationship management principles that lower-league clubs can use to build better fan relationships, while also identifying, using the same CRM optic, what actually led to the decline in quality. Second tier football has been chosen as opposed to top-flight because it consists of several clubs with development potential within their municipalities, because some of their problems are more stringent than in the upper league and, last but not least, in many cases, total attendance per game is as low as 50-300 people. The research starts with a general presentation of customer relationship management. In order to prepare CRM’s adaptation to the business of professional sports, some focus will be set on the services industry. The article then presents how CRM can be applied to sports, and, in the end, it narrows down to the specific case of Romanian football by starting the investigation from some of the challenges currently faced by the sport. Particular attention is granted to the online environment, as the latter one is host to a wide range of not very expensive CRM strategies and tactics that clubs can use, cost being a factor to be taken into account for a sector with scarce monetary resources. Last but not least, the paper ends with a set of recommendations as well as future ideas for research.

Open access
The cultural heritage circulation in a globalized world: Should we build stronger borders or stronger bridges?

Abstract

The scope of this paper is to explore if the free market and its corollaries - private property and the freedom to trade both nationally and internationally - are compatible with the conservation, search and optimal use of heritage goods. Our argument starts from the fact that culture is not a free-floating wraith but a set of tangible and intangible elements that are attributed special spiritual signification by the present generation and that are dependent on scarce material means to be expressed and passed on to our heirs. By taking scarcity as our starting point, we will provide an economic analysis of the implications that follow from the alternative approaches that can be employed to manage heritage goods, namely, a private property order coordinated through prices or a public property form of organisation coordinated through orders and interdictions. After tracing the implications of these two general principles of allocating resources, we will briefly look at how heritage goods are regulated, both on a national and international level, to gain a better understanding of the spirit that permeates the "rules of the game." Finally, we are going to see how the two general principles (market vs command and control) apply to the debate raging between the cosmopolites and the nationalists regarding the international trade in heritage goods. After carefully scrutinising some of the arguments put forward in this dispute over the appropriate means to be used, we conclude that free markets and free trade are the only adequate ways for reaching the objective sought by those on both sides of the debate.

Open access
Recommendations for the development of the National Network for Innovation and Technology Transfer (ReNITT) performances

business models: Origins, present, and future of the concept, Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 16 (1), 1-25. Osterwalder, A., Pigneur, Y. (2010). Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionairies, Game Changers, and Challengers, John Wiley & Sons. Öberga, C., Alexander, A.T. (2018). The openness of open innovation in ecosystems - Integrating innovation and management literature on knowledge linkages, Journal of Innovation & Knowledge, Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jik.2017

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A digital platform as a facilitator for assessing innovation potential and creating business models: a case study from the i3 project

Indicators . Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). Mendoza and Martin (2006), Multi-criteria decision analysis in natural resources management: A critical review of methods and new modeling paradigms , Forest Ecology and Management, 230, pp. 1-22. Osterwalder, A., & Pigneur, Y. (2010). Business model generation: a handbook for visionaries, game changers, and challengers . John Wiley & Sons Passani A., Monacciani F., Van Der Graaf S., Spagnoli F., Bellini F., Debicki M., Dini P. (2014). SEQUOIA: A methodology for the socio-economic impact

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Industry 4.0 and the digital society: concepts, dimensions and envisioned benefits

Deimler (2009). Business Model Innovation: When the Game Gets Tough, Change the Game. The Boston Consulting Group. Lu Y., 2017.Industry 4.0: A survey on technologies, applications and open research issues . Journal of Industrial Information Integration, 6, 1-10. Lukac, D. (2015). The fourth ICT-based industrial revolution" Industry 4.0" HMI and the case of CAE/CAD innovation with EPLAN P8, in: 23rd Telecommunications Forum Telfor (TELFOR), IEEE, pp. 835-838. Mckinsey&Company, (2016). Industry 4.0 after the initial hype, Mckinsey Digital

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IT in the workspace – The need for digital transformation

://www.emc.com/collateral/whitepapers/h15537-the-roi-of-private-cloud-wp.pdf Domo (2017). Data never sleeps 5.0. Retrieved from: https://webassets.domo.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17_domo_data-never-sleeps-5-01.png Evans, B. (2016) The Top 5 Cloud-Computing Vendors: #1 Microsoft, #2 Amazon, #3 IBM, #4 Salesforce, #5 SAP . Retrieved from: https://www.forbes.com/sites/bobevans1/2017/11/07/the-top-5-cloudcomputing-vendors-1-microsoft-2-amazon-3-ibm-4-salesforce-5-sap/#3c6b4cf86f2e Grand View Research (2017). Virtual Reality (VR) In Gaming Market Size

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Key elements of an entrepreneurial (business) model in the biogas sector. Insights from Romania

functional analysis. Energy Policy, 35(2), 925-938. Nichifor, M.A. (2015). Sustainable business models for wind and solar energy in Romania”, Management & Marketing. Challenges for the Knowledge Society, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 52‐60, DOI: 10.1515/mmcks‐2015‐0004 Osterwalder, A., & Pigneur, Y. (2010). Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers: Wiley. Raven, R.P.J.M., Geels, F.W. (2010). Socio-cognitive evolution in niche development: comparative analysis of biogas development in Denmark

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