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Abstract

This article offers a social science analysis of the resilience concept’s success and common sense uses. Based on a sample of letters from the readers of the French author Boris Cyrulnik’s self-help best-sellers, the article first depicts the characteristics of the attitude of the letters’ authors towards Cyrulnik and what they expect from him. Second, it proposes to understand resilience as a language game used to communicate about suffering and then analyses why certain readers feel resilient while others don’t. It concludes that this way of reacting to adversity (i. e., tapping one’s inner resources, never giving up) is particularly desirable in a context where autonomy has become more prestigious.

’s Dilemma. European Journal of Social Psychology 29(7): 909–924. Benenson, Joyce F., Johanna Pascoe und Nicola Radmore. 2007. Children’s Altruistic Behavior in the Dictator Gamer. Evolution and Human Behavior 28(3): 168–175. Berger, Roger, Heiko Rauhut, Sandra Prade und Dirk Helbing. 2012. Bargaining Over Waiting Time in Ultimatum Game Experiments. Social Science Research 41: 372–379. Brooks, Arthur C. 2005. Does Social Capital Make You Generous? Social Science Quarterly 86(1): 1–15. Brown, Jonathon D. (2012). Understanding the Better Than Average Effect: Motives

March 2016). Klaudy, Kinga. 2003 [1994]. Languages in translation . Budapest: Scholastica. Kövecses, Zoltán. 2010. Metaphor: a practical introduction . Oxford: Oxford University Press. Martin, George R. R. 2011 [1996]. A game of thrones. London: Harper Voyager. Martin, George R. R. 2014. Trónok harca [A game of thrones]. Translated by Tamás Pétersz. Budapest: Alexandra. Seidl, Jennifer–Mc Mordie, William. 1988 [1978]. English idioms (5 th edition). Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press. McPherron, Paul–Randolph, Patrick T. 2014. Cat got your tongue

translation. Budapest: Scholastica. Kövecses, Z. 2010. Metaphor: a practical introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Kvetko, P. 2009. English lexicology in theory and practice. Trnava. Martin, George R. R. 2011 [1996]. A Game of thrones. London: Harper Voyager. 2014. Trónok harca. Budapest: Alexandra Kiadó. McPherron, P.-Randolph, P. T. 2014. Cat got your tongue?: Recent research and classroom practices for teaching idioms to English learners around the world. TESOL Press. Newmark, P. 1988. A textbook on translation. New York, London: Prentice Hall. Reiss, K. 2014

Abstract

Civil society has proven outstanding capacities of involvement in the 2004 general elections in Romania and put a remarkable pressure on the political society. This paper aims to discuss the consequences of such involvement for both the political and civil society. We also investigate the conditions that have favoured a successful challenge of the main political actors by the most visible civic advocacy organizations. Further, we inquire how deep can an actor from the civil society go into the lands of the political society. In the end, we weight the achievements and the failures of civil society’s active involvement in the game of elections.

Abstract

My essay intends to analyze the dialectic relationship between historical reality and fiction in the novel The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie. I will point out a sophisticated and playful story in which the author interweaves elements of history and literature, a game-story that transcends the canonical limits of postmodernism where the novel has constantly been placed by the critical establishment, and goes back to the beginnings, to the anthropological function of play as an essential human activity that was once defined by Johan Huizinga in Homo Ludens: A Study of the Play-element in Culture. Moreover, my paper will explore how this play becomes Rushdie’s attempt to return to the original function of literature which used to enchant and inform at the same time. Once these roots have been reached, however, and the secondary reality of the literary game is well-established, Rushdie manages to break the barriers between reality and fiction, and through versatile textual mechanisms, to intermingle history and reality in a way that makes them merge. Consequently, he composes a play within fiction that is just as powerful as reality itself and suggests the fact that representation has more ontological consistency than the represented body or event itself. We exist as long as we are written and talked about, and nothing in the order of reality can be as powerful as the reality of language.

Abstract

This article presents a qualitative study aimed at investigating the framing of political discourse associated with the EU visa liberalization with Ukraine. This study seeks to address the framing of the EU visa liberalization process in Ukrainian political discourse published online by several leading high-quality Internet news resources, e.g. 112ua, Censor.Net, or UNIAN. The corpus of the study is comprised of 34 articles that have been analysed from the vantage point of framing methodology developed by and . The results of the qualitative investigation reveal that Ukrainian political discourse associated with the EU visa liberalization with Ukraine is framed by means of such frames as the Building, the Divorce, the European Integration, the Game, the Home, the Hostage, and the Journey. These findings are further presented and discussed in the article.

Abstract

The concept of an ‘underclass’ originates in the United States and is wide-spread in political and social science discourse today. Its power is most visible in discussions about deep cuts to social safety nets. The foundation of this discourse is the assigning of negative character traits and behaviours to poor people. This promotes the claim that they have brought negative consequences upon themselves and furthers the idea that poor people are personally responsible for their poverty. Discussion about an ‘underclass’ must be understood in the larger context of a comprehensive neoliberal ideological transformation, or ‘Newspeak’. Newspeak is implicitly based on the schema of a game in which everyone has the same chances, but which inevitably results in winners and losers.

Abstract

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories involve a hermeneutic game in which Holmes attempts to uncover the mystery of unsolved crime. The work of Hans-Georg Gadamer enables Holmes’s methods to be seen as both playful and creative as he seeks to understand what G. K. Chesterton refers to as the poetry of the modern world. Holmes is therefore a creative and scientific detective, one who loses himself in the game of detection in order to find himself in the search for truth in the wider world. Through the agency of Dr Watson, the reader is invited to join the game and attempt to work out the solution to the mystery as the narrative unfolds before them. Peter Hühn’s work on the detective as reader and writer is extended in relation to the work of understanding and creation carried out by authors who add new works to the genre of Holmesian fiction. This process is explored in the context of two playful writing workshops in which participants passed the opening of a piece of Holmesian fiction they had written to another participant to continue, before sharing the results with the group. Hans Robert Jauss’s ideas about genre and other perspectives on reimagining Holmes help contextualize the strategies used by participants, while Gadamer’s conception of the festive enables insights into the communal processes of creation and understanding.

References Bourdieu, Pierre. Regulile artei [ The Rules of Art ]. Translated from French by Laura Albulescu and Bogdan Ghiu. Bucharest: Art, 2007. Călinescu, George. Istoria literaturii române. De la origini până în prezent , [ The History of Romanian Literature. From its Origins up to the Present Time ] 2nd edition, revised. Bucharest: Minerva, 1986. Cornea, Paul. Regula jocului . [ The Rule of the Game ] Bucharest: Editura Eminescu, 1980. Cornea, Paul. “ Traduceri și traducători în prima jumătate a secolului al 19-lea ” [ Translators and Translations in the