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Time and Space in Early Norwegian Radio
Technology, Textuality, and Discursive Roles and Relations

Abstract

The present article takes its points of departure in medium and modernity theory (Meyrowitz 1985), as well as in the research on the special meaning patterns in developed broadcasting referred to as “para-social interaction” (Horton & Wohl 1956) and “flow” (Williams 1974, Ellis 1982). The empirical focus is on the early years of radio broadcasting in Norway (1925-1940). Through a detailed analysis of the relation between radio’s production and distribution technologies, on the one hand, and the formation of the medium’s textuality and discursive roles and relationships, on the other, the article assesses which stage in the fostering of a new sense of time and place Norwegian broadcasting had reached when the 1930s ebbed out. It is shown that very little in the way of the “blurring” of traditional distinctions between here and there, live and mediated, personal and public had become realities in the Norwegian context of the 1930s.

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Gestural Intermediality in Jean-Luc Godard’s First Name: Carmen (1983)

of Gestures. In Flow, Gesture, and Spaces in Free Jazz. Towards a Theory of Collaboration , eds. Guerino B. Mazzola and Paul B. Charlin, 79–87. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. Mondzain, Marie-José. 2011. Images (à suivre): de la poursuite au cinéma et ailleurs [ Images (to Follow): On Pursuit in Cinema and Elsewhere ]. Paris: Bayard. Noland, Carrie. 2008. Introduction. In Migrations of Gesture, eds. Carrie Noland and Sally Ann Ness, IX–XXVII. Minneapolis, London: University of Minnesota Press. Mulvey, Laura. 1992. The Hole and the Zero. The Janus

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Connected Youth
Young Students’ Extensibility and Use of the Internet to Search for Information

Abstract

The present article investigates how young people use the Internet to gain information about distant events that can be used in their schoolwork. The aim is to better understand the process behind youngsters’ construction of what is distant, which in turn may help us to understand how people construct knowledge and act in relation to such realities. Empirical sources originate from qualitative interviews and observations of Norwegian secondary school students using computers to search for information about tropical rainforests and climate change. A network approach has been used to frame this topic, in which extensibility and flow are the main analytical perspectives. The findings reveal that students tend to not connect directly to distant sources when looking for information about distant realities. Rather, they relate to the global flow of information by using national nodes of information flow that indirectly relate them to what is happening at a distance.

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The Underside of Communication in Development

Abstract

Efforts to relate the concepts of human development and human communication are complicated by their processual nature. The fact that in most cases communication has become synonymous with media and the need to take contexts into account further complicate such efforts. How the two well-meaning concepts interact in both developing and developed countries with oftentimes unintended, or even unwanted, effects is the subject of this paper. The underside of communication in development is discussed as the failure to address those forms of poverty that threaten equality, social cohesion, and the free flow of knowledge and information.

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Childhood and Children’s Retrospective Media Consumption Experiences
The case of Norway

Abstract

The focus in this article is on childhood and consumer culture with a special view on children’s media experiences retrospective. A historical perspective is applied as history provides an opportunity to reflect on changing processes within contemporary consumer culture, especially with a view on exploring how children grew up within a Norwegian context with the tradition of state regulated media. The following main research question is addressed: What are the dominant narratives on retrospective media experiences (radio and television)? The findings are based on a case study of adults reflecting on media consumption. Their experiences have been collected through focus group interviews as this approach can generate new insights into former experiences and contemporary childhood. The study shows that narratives on childhood in retrospective media experiences are influenced by both contemporary notions of childhood and the new media flow.

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Revisiting Michael Snow’s Wavelength, after Deleuze’s Time-Image

Abstract

Michael Snow’s Wavelength (1967) is one of the most written about avant-garde films. It has served as “a blue screen in front of which a range of ideological and intellectual dramas have been played out,” as Elizabeth Legge put it in a book-length study of the film, whose recent publication testifies to the continuing relevance of the film (Legge 2009). This paper takes Annette Michelson’s article, Toward Snow, one of the first and most often cited encounters with Snow’s cinema, as its point of departure (Michelson 1978). Michelson sees the film as a reflection which reveals the cinema as a temporal narrative medium. Drawing on Husserl’s phenomenology of time-consciousness, she argues that this reflection on the medium is at the same time a reflection on the structures of consciousness. However, the paper also draws on the work of Gilles Deleuze, whose two-volume study of the cinema has opened up new possibilities for thinking about time and the cinema (Deleuze 1983, 1985). The paper is not an interpretation of Deleuze. It appropriates and puts to work his idea that the cinema is not essentially a narrative medium; but a medium that disrupts linear time, making visible a non-chronological dimension of time, which fragments the subject and exposes it to liminal situations. Wavelength, I argue, reverses the flow of time, to make visible an abyss at the heart of time, which shatters the unity of the subject

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See, Seeing, Seen, Saw: A Phenomenology of Ultra-Violent Cinema

Abstract

Vivian Sobchack claims in Carnal Thoughts that human bodies are continually remade by the “technologies of photography, cinema, and the electronic media” (2004, 135). One such sphere of contemporary media that continuously redefines the notion of the human body is horror cinema. The recent advent of so-called ‘gorenography,’ spearheaded by James Wan and Leigh Whannel’s Saw (2004), issues conceptual and philosophical challenges to the presentation and conceptualization of the phenomenal body. Following in the scope of frameworks advanced by both Sobchack and Jennifer Barker this paper aims to explore how the body of the Saw series is constructed and how it emulates both the conceptualized bodies of its viewers and the state of modern information flow in a technological age. It will be argued that the Saw series not only recognises viewers’ enjoyment of its genre conventions but also acknowledges and manipulates their engagement with the film as a phenomenological object through which a sense of re-embodiment can be enacted

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The Prism of Change
‘Continuity’ in Public Service Television in the Digital Era

References Bulck, Hilde van den, & Enli, Gunn Sara (2014a). Flow under pressure: Television scheduling and continuity techniques as victims of media convergence? Television and New Media, 15 (5), 441-452. Bulck, Hilde van den, & Enli, Gunn Sara (2014b). Bye, bye “Hello Ladies?”: In-vision announcers as continuity technique in a European postlinear television landscape: The case of Flanders and Norway. Television and New Media, 15 (5), 453-469. Caldwell, John T. (2003). Second shift media aesthetics. Programming, interactivity, and user flows

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Wikipedia – Free and Reliable?
Aspects of a Collaboratively Shaped Encyclopaedia

). Studying Cooperation and Conflict between Authors with History Flow Visualization . Proceeding of the 2004 conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI). New York: ACM.

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Mediated Culture and the Well-informed Global Citizen
Images of Africa in the Global North

) Import/Export: International Flow of Television Fiction. Paris: Unesco. Mail and Guardian (2006) ‘Amandla!: Tsotsi wins Oscar’, March 6, p. 11. www.mg.co.za (Mail and Guardian), December 8, 2009. ‘SA actors attack Hollywood casting of Mandelas. McCall Smith, Alexander (1998) The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency . Polygon. McCall Smith, Alexander (2006) Blue Shoes and Happiness. Polygon. Miller, Toby (ed.) (2003) Television. Critical Concepts in Media and Cultural Studies. London: Routledge. Mungoshi, Charles (1997) Walking Still

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