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Osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in Thai silk fibroin/collagen hydrogel: a pilot study in vitro

Hydrogels are cross-linked hydrophilic polymer networks that can contain a high amount of water. Their hydrated network architecture provides a place for cells to adhere, proliferate, and differentiate. They are generally nontoxic and biocompatible. In tissue engineering, hydrogels can be used to encapsulate living cells as a cell delivery system and as a scaffold for tissue regeneration. Moreover, hydrogels can be delivered to a target site in a minimally invasive manner. Nevertheless, the gelling process must be benign for cell survival and to avoid damage to

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Nanoparticle interaction with the immune system / Interakcije nanodelcev z imunskim sistemom

acid) nanoparticles encapsulating betamethasone sodium phosphate. Ann Rheum Dis 2005;64:1132-6. doi: 10.1136/ard.2004.030759 64. Xu W, Ling P, Zhang T. Toward immunosuppressive effects on liver transplantation in rat model: tacrolimus loaded poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactide) nanoparticle with longer survival time. Int J Pharm 2014;460:173-80. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2013.10.035 65. Shen CC, Wang CC, Liao MH, Jan TR. A single exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles attenuates antigen-specific antibody production and T-cell reactivity

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Niosomes: a review of their structure, properties, methods of preparation, and medical applications

compartment [ 8 , 11 , 12 ]. Niosomes are vesicles of nonionic surfactant (for example, alkyl ester and alkyl ether) and cholesterol that act as a carrier for amphiphilic and lipophilic drugs [ 7 , 8 , 13 , 14 ]. Niosomes improve the therapeutic performance of encapsulated drug molecules by protecting the drug from harsh biological environments, resulting in their delayed clearance [ 15 ]. Novel drug development is both time consuming and expensive. The development of a new drug costs an estimated $120 million, and the journey from discovery, clinical testing, and

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New Drug Delivery Systems Concept in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care—Controlled Release of Active Compounds

, Grayson SM. Approaches for the preparation of non-linear amphiphilic polymers and their applications to drug delivery. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2012; 64:852-865 19. Prow TW, Grice JE, Lin LL, et al. Nanoparticles and microparticles for skin drug delivery. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2011; 63: 470-491 20. Jansen JFGA, Meijer EW, de Brabandervan den Berg EMM. The dendritic box: shape-selective liberation of encapsulated guests. J Am Chem Soc 1995; 117:4417-4418 21. Venkataraman S, Hedrick JL, Ong ZY, et al. The effects of polymeric nanostructure shape on drug delivery

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New Drug Delivery Systems Concept in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care—Controlled Release of Active Compounds

: shape-selective liberation of encapsulated guests. J Am Chem Soc 1995; 117:4417-4418 21. Venkataraman S, Hedrick JL, Ong ZY, et al. The effects of polymeric nanostructure shape on drug delivery. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2011; 63:1228-1246 22. Mudshinge SR, Deore AB, Patil S, Bhalgat CM. Nanoparticles: Emerging carriers for drug delivery. Saudi Pharm J 2011; 19:129-141 23. Prakash S, Malhotra M, Shao W, Tomaro-Duchesneau C, Abbasi S. Polymeric nanohybrids and functionalized carbon nanotubes as drug delivery carriers for cancer

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Nanoparticles in therapeutic applications and role of albumin and casein nanoparticles in cancer therapy

nature, liposomes are well suited for drug delivery. Liposomes can be used as carriers for numerous types of molecules, for example to encapsulate antioxidants and biotic elements in drug delivery systems [ 9 ]. Liposome nanoparticles made from lipids or polymers could be constructed to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic potential of drugs [ 9 , 10 ]. Liposomes, can also be used as imaging agents [ 11 ]. The imaging moiety together with a drug-delivery function creates a theranostic agent (with combined diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities) [ 9 , 11 ]. An

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Magnetic resonance imaging findings of hepatocellular carcinoma: typical and atypical findings

. Hepatocellular carcinoma: MR imaging. Australas Radiol. 1992; 36:34-6. 18. Ito K. Hepatocellular carcinoma: conventional MRI findings including gadolinium-enhanced dynamic imaging. Eur J Radiol. 2006; 58:186-99. 19. Choi BI, Lee GK, Kim ST, Han MC. Mosaic pattern of encapsulated hepatocellular carcinoma: Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging and pathology. Gastrointest Radiol. 1990; 15:238-40. 20. Jonas S, Bechstein WO, Steinmuller T, Herrmann M, Radke C, Berg T et al. Vascular invasion and histopathologic grading determine

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