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THE EVALUATION OF ECOLOGICAL FACTOR S AFFECTING ENVIRONMENTAL FUNCTION S OF THE SOIL S IN AREA OF TRADITIONAL AGRARIAN STRUCTURE S

Abstract

Krnačova Z., Hreško J., Kanka R., Boltižiar M.: The evaluation of ecological factors affecting environmental functions of the soils in area of traditional agrarian structure. Ekologia (Bratislava),Vol. 32, No. 2, p. 248-261, 2013. Cultural landscape can be seen as a result of hundred years of founding and sensitive cultivation of landscape structures respecting natural conditions. Specific geomorphological, climatic as well as social conditions enabled the conservation of original agrarian landscape structures mainly in the marginal regions of Slovakia. They are created by mosaic structures of extensively used small-scale landscape elements of permanent agricultural and arable land. An example of traditional agrarian way of using is foothill meadow-grazing landscape of the village Liptovska Teplička. By using the traditional extensive maintenance of the agricultural landscape, optimal environmental characteristics of soils were preserved. These were modified to some extent by the way of using and management. The submitted contribution is focused on the following:

• Indication of environmental characteristics of soils

• Quantification of the influence of chosen ecological factors on these environmental functions Seven research localities representing main types of the traditional landscape maintenance were chosen for needs of the research of soil and environmental conditions in a relation with the way of using the land and management. In given localities, we chose 21 sampling sites for secondary landscape structure (according to the legend of project Corine Land Cover, 2000), geological, soil, physical, biochemical and chemical conditions evaluation. Environmental functions indication was assessed in the following way: by assigning an amount of organic carbon (Cox) in a standard way (Fiala et al., 1999) for production functions, by assigning a ratio of granular fractions (pipetting method according to Novak) for retention functions. Buffering functions were evaluated potentiometrically by assigning an active soil reaction of pH (H2O) and exchange reaction of pH (KCl) in a soil. Highest values of Cox in the Ap horizon (7.67-6.62%), as well as pH of the soil environment (pH/KCl 7.26-7.21, pH/H2O 7.69-7.68) were assigned to anthrosolic and cultisolic rendzinas of extensively used grasslands. On the contrary, the lowest monitored values of organic matter Cox (2.51-2.53%), as well as pH of the soil environment (pH/KCl 4.81-5.21) (pH/ H2O 5.21-6.19) were indicated for soil subtypes anthrosols of the large fields and lithosol of theextensively used grasslands on non-carbonate substrates. Most favourable production and buffering soil properties were preserved in rendzinas on the carbonate substrates and extensively used meadows. Similarly, this type of soil on limestone used in a form of extensive meadows preserved also the most favourable retention functions according to the stated ratio of granularity fractions. Quantification of the influence of chosen ecological factors on environmental functions was performed using multivariate statistical methods, specifically principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is an indirect gradient analysis using the linear correlation of data, with a biplot as an output. Closeness of points in ordination graph represents their similarity of composition. The CANOCO (Ter Braak, Šmilauer, 2002) software was used to perform the analysis and to create the graph.

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Public Spaces and Cultural Heritage in Community Projects – The Example of Warsaw

REFERENCES ASSMANN, J. (1995), ‘Collective memory and cultural identity’, New German Critique , 65, pp. 125–133. AUGÉ, M. (1995), Non-Places. Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity , London–New York: Verso. BECKLEY, T. M. (2003), ‘The Relative Importance of Sociocultural and Ecological Factors in Attachment to Place’, [in:] KRUGER L. E. (ed.), Understanding Community-Forest Relations , Portland: USDA, pp. 105–126. CARMONA, M. (2015), ‘Re-theorising contemporary public space: a new narrative and a new normative’, Journal of

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Exploring Growth Variability and Crown Vitality of Sessile Oak (Quercus Petraea) in the Czech Republic

in oak productivity in northeastern France. The role of climate and atmospheric CO2. Annals of Forest Sci-ence 51: 477-492. Bergès L, Nepveu G and Franc A, 2008. Effects of ecological factors on radial growth and wood density components of sessile oak (Quer-cus petraea Liebl.) in Northern France. Forest Ecology and Management 255(3-4): 567-579, DOI 10.1016/j.foreco.2007.09.027. Biondi F and Waikul K, 2004. DendroClim2002: AC++ program for statistical calibration of climate signals in tree ring chronologies. Computers & Geosciences

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Some considerations in the reconstruction of lead levels using laser ablation: lessons from the design stage of dendrochemistry study, St.John's, Canada

, 1990. Methods of Dendrochronology, Applications in the Environmental Sciences. Dodrecht, Boston, London, Kluwer Academic Publishers: 394pp Cote B and Camire C, 1995. Application of leaf, soil, and tree ring chemistry to determine the nutritional status of sugar maple on sites of different levels of decline. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 83: 363–373, DOI 10.1007/BF00477363. Cutter BE and Guyette RP, 1993. Anatomical, chemical, and ecological factors affecting tree species choice in dendrochemical studies. Journal of Environmental Quality 22: 611–619, DOI 10

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Can we distinguish between tree-ring eccentricity developed as a result of landsliding and prevailing winds? consequences for dendrochronological dating

.06.004. 10.1016/j.dendro.2008.06.004 Duncker P Spiecker H 2008 Cross-sectional compression wood distribution and its relation to eccentric radial growth in Picea abies [L.] Karst Dendrochronologia 26 3 195 202 10.1016/j.dendro.2008.06.004 Ennos AR, 1997. Wind as an ecological factor. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 12(3): 108–111, DOI 10.1016/S0169-5347(96)10066-5. 10.1016/S0169-5347(96)10066-5 Ennos AR 1997 Wind as an ecological factor Trends in Ecology & Evolution 12 3 108 111 10.1016/S0169-5347 (96)10066-5 Franco-Ramos O , S

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Assessment of Mountain Ecosystems Changes Under Anthropogenic Pressure in Latorica River Basin (Transcarpathian Region, Ukraine)

). Dominant species identity regulates invasibility of old-field plant communities. Oikos, 115, 549-558. DOI: 10.1111/j.2006.0030-1299.15172.x. Godefroid, S., Phartyal, S.S., Weyembergh, G. & Koedam N. (2005). Ecological factors controlling the abundance of non-native invasive black cherry (Prunus serotina) in deciduous forest understory in Belgium. For. Ecol. Manag, 210, 91-105. DOI: 10.1016/j.foreco.2005.02.024. Herenchuk, K. (1981). Nature of Zakarpatska Oblast (Transcarpathia). Lviv: Vyshcha Shkola Publishing House. Honnay O., Jacquemyn, H., Bossuyt, B

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Young urban trees as important structures in the cultural heritage of cities – a case study from Prague

, 417: 1–17. Zackrisson O., Ostlund L., Korhonen O., Bergman I. 2000. The ancient use of Pinus sylvestris L. (Scots pine) inner bark by Sami people in northern Sweden, related to cultural and ecological factors. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany , 9, 2: 99–109.

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Local livelihoods and global process: complex causalities in Hong Kong’s Sai Kung Peninsula

-acting ( Aide & Grau 2004 ; Rudel et al. 2005 ) socio-economic and socio-ecological factors ( Lambin & Meyfroidt 2010 ) have been important in driving changes in economic activities in the Sai Kung Peninsula. The early history of the peninsula sees changes in economic activities being driven by a combination of local and distant drivers, with new areas of land exploited by migrants but the contours of their land use being shaped by the geography and ecology of the local area. During the period of British rule changes were increasingly driven by distant factors, such as

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Antropogenically Created Forest Edge in the Starohorské Vrchy Mts. on the Example of Donovaly Village

Antropogenically Created Forest Edge in the Starohorské Vrchy Mts. on the Example of Donovaly Village

Forest edges represent specific elements forming the character of landscape. They are very important factors in ecological stability. To know and to understand them as a part of dynamic and hierarchic structure in vertical and horizontal shaping of the landscape contributes to understanding of the processes between forest and non-forested landscape in connection to influence of ecological factors towards broad knowledge of the country in the shape of its utilization and monitoring of its dynamic changes. The aim of the paper is to analyze in a geographic sense the types of anthropic forest edges in the area of Starohorské vrchy Mts. (on the example of Donovaly village) and their partial geographic synthesis in the frame of chosen attributes and forest edge functions. Basic question is whether human activity influences the dynamics of environmental variables, its structure, taxonomic diversity and other attributes of forest edges.

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The effect of the selected remediation medium on the cadmium bioavailability in the selected ecosystem in the Southwestern locality of Slovakia

Abstract

Soil is a sensitive ecological factor. Biodegradable materials from the environment can also be used to deal with serious ecological problems. Soil affecting by remediation medium - garden compost - was analysed for toxic cadmium (Cd) in terms of environmental protection. The objective of this research was to analyse soil and compost at foothill locality of the Tribeč Mountains (Southwestern Slovakia) in the years 2015−2017 to determine Cd contents in soil and compost, pH and to assess Cd bioavailability. The analyses were carried out using the Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with seven-step Selective Sequential Extraction methods. The results obtained were evaluated statistically using the SAS 9.4 software method by Spearman’s correlation coefficient. The results showed that Cd contents in soil had reached 2.96 mg kg−1 and soil with compost (the ratio 1:1) 2.71 mg kg−1 dry matter. Cd contents in the soil exceeded maximum allowed limit of 196%. And deceased by 25% after adding compost. The pH in soil with compost varied from 6.78 to 7.98. The pH prevented the mobility of Cd about 8.3% in average. Statistical dependence was high, which was demonstrated for relationship between Cd in soil, pH and compost. Available Cd forms in soil were 53.3% and soil with compost were 45% in average. The garden compost as a remediation medium reduced Cd bioavailability.

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