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Adherence to the DASH-style Diet and the Presence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Adults from Tîrgu Mureș

European Region. Available at: http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/185903/e96816.pdf . 4. World Health Organization. Global Health Observatory (GHO) data: Raised blood pressure. Available at: http://www.who.int/gho/ncd/risk_factors/blood_pressure_prevalence_text/en . 5. Blumenthal JA, Babyak, MA, Hinderliter, A et al. Effects of the DASH diet alone and in combination with exercise and weight loss on blood pressure and cardiovascular biomarkers in men and women with high blood pressure: the ENCORE study. Arch Intern Med . 2010

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Perception of Healthy Eating among Romanian Adults

REFERENCES 1. Mozaffarian D. Dietary and Policy Priorities for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity – a comprehensive review. Circulation . 2016;133:187-225. 2. World Health Organization. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases. Report of joint WHO/FAO expert consultation. WHO Technical Report Series, No 916. https://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/trs916/intro . (14 February 2019) 3. Stephenson J, Heslehurst N, Hall J, et al. Before the beginning: nutrition and lifestyle in the preconception period and

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An Overview of Disease Burden, Mechanism, Traditional and Non-traditional Management of Type 2 Diabetes

-calorie diet and 6 months of weight stability in type 2 diabetes: pathophysiological changes in responders and nonresponders. Diabetes Care . 2016;39:808-815. 25. Steven S, Lim EL, Taylor R. Population response to information on reversibility of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic Medicine . 2013;30:e135-e138. 26. Mottalib A, Sakr M, Shehabeldin M, Hamdy O. Diabetes remission after nonsurgical intensive lifestyle intervention in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. J Diabetes Res . 2015;2015. 27. Gregg EW, Chen H, Wagenknecht LE, et al. Association of an intensive

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Epicardial Fat and Coronary Vulnerability

. Measurement of epicardial fat thickness by transthoracic echocardiography for predicting high-risk coronary artery plaques. Heart Vessels . 2016;31:1758-1766. 17. Larsen BA, Laughlin GA, Saad SD, et al. Pericardial fat is associated with all-cause mortality but not incident CVD: the Rancho Bernardo Study. Atherosclerosis . 2015;239:470-475. 18. Rabkin SW, Campbell H. Comparison of reducing epicardial fat by exercise, diet or bariatric surgery weight loss strategies: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obes Rev . 2015;16:406-415. 19. Higgins JP

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Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Lactic Acidosis in a Paediatric Critical Care Unit

of 14.87. This was suggestive of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency (PDCD) ( Table 1 ). A skeletal muscle biopsy showed low levels of activated PDC and PDC/E3 ratio ( Table 1 ) as well as a pyruvate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial complex panel testing positive for pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha 1 (PDHA1) gene mutation confirming the diagnosis of PDCD. The patient was given a trial of a ketogenic diet (KD) which did not result in an elevation of lactate levels ( Figure 2 ). He remained on prolonged mechanical ventilation secondary to the development of acute

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The Role of Healthy Diet and Lifestyle in Preventing Chronic Diseases

REFERENCES 1. World Health Organization. Global Health Estimates 2016: Deaths by Cause, Age, Sex, by Country and by Region, 2000–2016. Geneva: WHO, 2016. https://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/GHE2016_Deaths_WBInc_2000_2016.xls?ua=1 2. World Health Organization. Noncommunicable diseases country profiles 2018. Geneva: WHO, 2018. https://www.who.int/nmh/publications/ncd-profiles-2018/en/ 3. World Health Organization. Diet, nutrition and prevention of chronic diseases. Report of a Joint Expert Consultation. Geneva: WHO/FAO, 2003

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Gastroenterological Perspectives on Acute Cardiac Care — the Management of Patients with Implanted Coronary Stents Following an Acute Coronary Syndrome

Abstract

Cardiovascular and digestive diseases frequently share the same risk factors such as obesity, unhealthy diet, or several social behaviors, and the increasing prevalence of patients with overlapped cardiovascular and digestive symptoms is a challenging problem in the daily practice. Patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease can exhibit various forms of chest pain that can be very similar to angina. Furthermore, antithrombotic therapies used for preventive or curative purposes in patients with cardiovascular diseases are frequently associated with gastrointestinal side effects including bleeding. At the same time, in patients with coronary stents presenting to the emergency department with chest pain, angina triggered by stent thrombosis or restenosis should be differentiated from angina-like symptoms caused by a gastrointestinal disease. The aim of this review was to present the complex inter-relation between gastroesophageal diseases and angina in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy following an acute coronary syndrome, with a particular emphasis on the role of anemia resulting from occult or manifest gastrointestinal bleeding, as a precipitating factor for triggering or aggravating angina.

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Nutritional Status and Clinical Outcomes of Cardiac Patients in Acute Settings

REFERENCES 1. Cernea S, Hâncu N, Raz I. Diet and coronary heart disease in diabetes. Acta Diabetol. 2003;40:S389-S400. doi: 10.1007/s00592-003-0125-8. 2. Renaud S, Lanzmann-Petithory D. Coronary heart disease: dietary links and pathogenesis. Public Health Nutr. 2001;4:459-474. 3. Hu FB, Willett WC. Optimal diets for prevention of coronary heart disease. JAMA. 2002;288:2569-2578. 4. Eilat-Adar S, Sinai T, Yosefy C, Henkin Y. Nutritional recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention. Nutrients. 2013;5:3646-3683. doi: 10.3390/nu

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Precision Medicine and its Role in the Treatment of Sepsis: A Personalised View

Introduction Hippocrates, the “Father” of modern medicine, was convinced that disease was a result of multiple factors, including the patient’s lifestyle, environmental forces and diet. Accordingly, as these are unique for every individual, treatment should be focused on the individual. He stated that because the organism acts as one, it should be treated as one, and not as individual parts of a bigger system. In recent times, a new form of medicine has become increasingly exercised, namely personalised medicine (PM) and is efficacious in many medical

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Malnutrition and Metabolic Changes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

, Leptin Soluble Receptor, and the Free Leptin Index following a Diet and Physical Activity Lifestyle Intervention in Obese Males and Females. J Obes . 2016;2016:8375828. 11. HOMA software. Available at: https://www.dtu.ox.ac.uk/homacalculator/download.php . 12. Durnin J, Womersley J. Body fat assessed from total body density and its estimation from skinfold thickness: measurements on 481 men and women aged from 16 to 72 years. Br J Nutr . 1974;32:77-97. 13. Harris JA, Benedict FG. A Biometric study of human basal metabolism. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S

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