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“I Understand You, So I’ll Not Hurt You with My Irony”: Correlations Between Irony and Emotional Intelligence

Abstract

Due to the growing interest not only in theoretical approaches to irony, but also in its pragmatic functions, the number of questions is increasing. One of them is: Is irony in any way connected to emotional intelligence? This paper outlines what irony is and how it is used in everyday conversations. Analysis of current studies in emotional intelligence highlights its influence over behavior and attitude. It led to an experiment where subjects (N = 80) where asked to fill an emotional intelligence questionnaire and an irony questionnaire. The results show that emotional intelligence is negatively correlated with the overall sum of ironic sentences and self-ironic sentences, and with the number of ironic praise sentences. Later, the implications of empirical findings are discussed.

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Parental Directiveness as a Predictor of Children’S Behavior at Kindergarten

.B., Lyon, J.E., Lin, E.K., McGrath, E.P., & Bimbela, A. (1999). Children “tune out” in response to the ambiguous communication style of powerless adults. Child Development , 70 (1), 214-230. Chlewiński, Z. & Grzywa, A. (1987). Zastosowanie analizy kanonicznej do badania związku leku z innymi objawami psychopatycznymi [The application of canonical analysis in studying the correlation between medication and other psychopathic symptoms]. In J. Brzeziński (Ed.), Wielozmiennowe modele statystyczne w badaniach psychologicznych [ Multivariate statistical

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Coping Strategies of Intellectually Gifted and Common Adolescents Attending Grammar School in the Context of the Personality Dimensions Structure

-80-89256-87-7. Macek, P. (2003). Adolescence. 2. upr. vyd. Praha: Portál, 2003. 142 s. ISBN 8071787477. O’Connor, N. (2015). The Correlation Among Personality Characteristics, Stress, and Coping of Caregivers of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: dissertation. Walden University Schlar Works, p. 148. Preuss, L. J. – Dubow, E.F. (2004). A comparison between intellectualy gifted and typical children in their coping responses to a school and peer stressor. Roeper Review , 2004, vol. 26, no. 2, p.105-112. Rothbaum, F. – Weisz, J. R. – Snyder

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Metaphor Processing in Schizophrenia Patients: A Study of Comprehension and Explanation of Metaphors

Abstract

The study assessed the quantity and quality of errors made by schizophrenia patients in understanding and interpretation of the same metaphors, to evaluate metaphor understanding and explanation depending on the type of presentation material, and to analyze the correlation of illness symptoms with metaphor comprehension and explanation. Two groups of participants were examined: a schizophrenia sample (40 participants) and a control group (39 participants). Metaphor processing was assessed by the subtests of the Polish version of the Right Hemisphere Language Battery (RHLB-PL). The patients were also evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Schizophrenia patients scored significantly lower in explanation of metaphors, making more incorrect literal and abstract mistakes or providing no answer more frequently. No differences were observed in understanding metaphors; no correlation between symptoms and metaphor processing was obtained. In both groups, picture metaphors were easier to comprehend and written metaphors were easier to comprehend than to explain.

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Conflict Resolution and Relational Patterns in the Families of Origin of Women and Men

Conflict Resolution and Relational Patterns in the Families of Origin of Women and Men

The aim of the studies was to seek an answer to the following question: Which relationship patterns correlate with different conflict resolution strategies in women's and men's intimate relationships? The subjects were 56 engaged couples (aged 19-37) answering Conflict Resolution Strategy Questionnaires, Personal Authority in the Family System Questionnaires and The Family of Origin Scale. The network of correlations between conflict resolution strategies and relationship patterns is more complex for women than for men. In the women's group, the correlation connects constructive strategies (dialogue and loyalty) foremost with patterns defining intimacy (or its components). However, destructive strategies (exit and neglect) are related to patterns definitive of individuation levels in the family of origin, independence and position. In the men's group, however, the correlation connects conflict resolution strategies (constructive and destructive) to relationship patterns definitive of partner relations. Furthermore, constructive strategies are associated with lower intergeneration triangulation intensity and higher intergenerational intimidation intensity.

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A Study of Foreign Language Learning Styles Used by Georgian Students

A Study of Foreign Language Learning Styles Used by Georgian Students

The aim of the work was to research learning style distribution in Georgian university students to determine which styles or their complexes are optimal in foreign language learning in similar conditions of teaching. Learning style preferences of more and less successful students were compared using a standardized test (Ehrman, 1998). An analysis of frequencies does not reveal reliable differences between more successful and less successful students. A statistically reliable correlation between varieties of styles was detected only in more successful students, giving grounds to conclude that successful students use diverse and multiple styles, while less successful ones are mostly stuck with one style.

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Internally-driven change and feature correspondence in object representation: A key to children's essentialism?

Internally-driven change and feature correspondence in object representation: A key to children's essentialism?

Two experiments were run to investigate how preschoolers use the pattern of an object's change as a cue to noticing correlations among the object's subsequent features. Four-year-old children were familiarized with either an internally or externally-driven transformation of an object, and tested for identification of an animation that did not match the familiar sequence of the object's features. In both experiments children in the internal-change group identified the incorrect sequence significantly more quickly than in the external-change condition. These results strongly suggest that perception of internally-driven transformation facilitates the formation of and/or access to a representation of correspondences between subsequent features of an object. The possible role of this mechanism in essentialist thinking is discussed at the end of the paper.

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Meaning in Phonology and Other Departures from Modularity in the Living Language

Abstract

I review evidence of three kinds relating to leakages in modularity within language domains and between linguistic and nonlinguistic action. One kind of evidence shows that the form-meaning “rift” in language that enables the important principle of duality of patterning and the particulate principle of self-diversifying systems is bridged in many ways. Segmental language forms have iconic meanings, and form-meaning correlations of other kinds emerge cross linguistically. A second kind of evidence occurs in parallel transmission of linguistic prosodic information with iconic and emotional information conveyed suprasegmentally. The final kind of evidence shows the integrality of linguistic and nonlinguistic action (deictic points, speech-accompanying gestures, head motions, facial expressions, etc) in conveying communicative information in public language use. I suggest that these violations of modularity within language and between linguistic and nonlinguistic action reflect the dynamic effects of sets of competing and cooperating constraints including, among others, parity and learnability of language forms that shape communicative actions in social activity.

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Reading alphasyllabic hindi: contributions from phonological and orthographic domains

Abstract

Phonological and orthographic processing are important cognitive skills required in reading. The present study attempts to investigate the role of phonological processing and orthographic knowledge, in reading alphasyllabic Hindi orthography. The sample constituted 65 children from Grade 4. The result of hierarchical multiple regression indicated that the variance in reading fluency was significantly explained by phonological processing and orthographic knowledge measured through the tasks of rapid automatized naming, syllable deletion and dictation. The variance in reading accuracy was significantly explained only by orthographic knowledge measured through a dictation task. Phonological short-term memory showed significant correlations with all the reading measures but was non-significant in explaining the unique variance in reading. The limitation of the study and suggestions for future research is discussed.

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Brief Report: The Role of Psychological Language in Children’S Theory of Mind and Self-Concept Development

Abstract

Children’s self-concept and theory of mind are both important factors in children’s social, cognitive and emotional development. Research on gender differences in children’s theory of mind understanding reveals contradictory findings such as higher degree of social understanding or theory of mind in girls (Villaneuva Badenes, Clemente Estevan, & Garcia Bacete 2000), boys score higher than girls (Russell et al., 2007), or no gender differences at all (Villaneuva Badenes, Clemente Estevan, & Garcia Bacete, 2000). This research study is part of a larger 3-year longitudinal study, investigating children’s social and emotional development during middle childhood. This study explores the gendered relations between self-concept and social understanding (including psychological language) in middle school aged children (n = 49, ages 11-13). Results suggest a negative correlation between boys’ sense of self-worth and psychological language. Implications for curriculum development that promotes socio-emotional literacy within middle school are discussed

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