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Study of Correlations Between Clinical Signs and Morphological Features Identified in Dogs Affected with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

.x PMid:17708389 5. Simpson, K.W., Jergens, A.E. (2011). Pitfalls and progress in the diagnosis and management of canine inflammatory bowel disease. Vet Clin Small Anim. 41, 381-398. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cvsm.2011.02.003 PMid:21486642 6. Rychlik, A., Nieradka, R., Kander, M., Nowicki, M., Wdowiak, M., Kolodziejska-Sawerska, A. (2012). A correlation between the canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index score and the histopathological evaluation of the small intestinal mucosa in canine inflammatory bowel disease. Pol J Vet Sci. 15, 315

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Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in Abdominal Fluid in Dogs with Oncological and Non-Oncological Diseases

5. Ghasemi, M., Omid, E., Farshad, N., Ahmadreza, B., Saeid, A., Laleh, V., Moghimpour, R. (2011). Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its correlation with tumor grade in breast ductal carcinoma. Acta Medica Iranica 49(12): 776-779. 6. Stefanou, D., Anna, B., Sevasti, K., Evdokia, A., Dionysios, J.P., Niki, J.A. (2004). Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and association with microvessel density in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. In Vivo 18(2): 155-160. 7. Campos, A.G., Campos

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Milkability Evaluation of Jersey Dairy Cows by Lactocorder

of lactation. Ital J Anim Sci. 8, 103-111. https://doi.org/10.4081/ijas.2009.103 16. Juozaitiene, V., Japertiene, R. (2010). The milking speed heritability and fenotypic and genetic correlation with productivity, milk yield and somatic cell count in lithuanian black-and white cows. Vet Zootec. 50 (72): 35-41. 17. Samoré, A. B., Rizzi, R., Rossoni, A., Bagnato, A. (2010). Genetic parameters for functional longevity, type traits, SCS, milk flow and production in the Italian Brown Swiss. Ital J Anim Sci. 9, 145-152. https://doi.org/10.4081/ijas.2010.e28

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Mammary Adenocarcinoma with Widespread Metastasis in a Lion (Panthera Leo)

in breast carcinoma, its correlation with Ki-67 and other histopathological parameters. Indian J Cancer. 50, 189-194. https://doi.org/10.4103/0019-509X.118724 PMid:24061457 13. Lian T. L., Guan, J., Qian, C., Jun, N. Z. (2015). Ki-67 is a promising molecular target in the diagnosis of cancer. Mol Med Rep.11, 1566-1572. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2014.2914 PMid:25384676 14. Cagnini, D. Q., Salgado, B. S., Linardi, J. L., Grandi, F., Rocha, R. M., Rocha, N. S., Teixeira, C. R., Del Piero, F., Sequeira, J. L. (2012). Ocular melanoma and mammary

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Prevalence of Subclinical Mastitis Pathogens in Small Dairy Farms in Republic of North Macedonia

Scientific Papers, 12(3-4): 47-57. [in Serbian] 13. Bojkovic Kovacevic, S., Lazarevic, N. (2009). Correlation between CMT test, subclinical mastitis and somatic cell count. Proceedings of Scientific Papers, 15(3-4) 29-37. [in Serbian] 14. Manzi, M. de P., Nуbrega, D.B., Faccioli, P.Y., Troncarelli, M.Z., Menozzi, B.D, Langoni, H. (2012). Relationship between teat-end condition, udder cleanliness and bovine subclinical mastitis. Res Vet Sci. 93, 430-434. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2011.05.010 PMid:21669449 15. National Mastitis Council (2012

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Metabolic Profile Comparison between Follicular Fluid and Serum in Normal Cows and Those Affected by Ovarian Cysts

Abstract

The aim of this study was to carry out the metabolic profile comparison between follicular fluid and serum in normal cows and those affected by ovarian cysts (OC). After slaughtering, blood samples and follicular fluids from normal and cystic animals were collected and assayed using commercial kits to determine the concentrations of metabolites (glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, cortisol, triglycerides, urea, creatinine and insulin) and the liver enzymes activity. Data showed that OC were characterized by low levels of glucose, total protein, cholesterol and cortisol in cystic fluid, while urea concentrations were high compared to normal follicular fluid (P<0.001). On the other hand, serum assays of cystic animals revealed very low values of insulin and urea, whereas cortisol levels were relatively high in comparison with the serum of normal cows (P<0.001). Significant correlations between the serum and follicular fluid concentrations of normal cows were found for glucose (r=0.49), total cholesterol (r=0.31), cortisol (r=0.38) and total protein (r=0.63). The highest correlation was found for urea (r=0.86). On contrary, weak correlations were observed between metabolites concentrations in cystic fluid and in serum for normal and cystic cows. In conclusion, OC grow and persist in a metabolic environment, which differs from follicular fluid to blood. These changes may act together and/or separately to ensure the continuous development of OC. To understand a part of the mechanism, the authors propose a deep study about blood-follicle-barrier.

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Influence of Metabolic Cage on Wistar Rat Physiological State

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of metabolic cage housing on the Wistar rat physiological state and to analyze the correlation between the minerals in blood and urine. Thirty male rats were used in the experiment. Fifteen rats (control group) were housed individually in standard polycarbonate cages and fifteen rats (experimental group) in metabolic cages (Techniplast, Italy) for two weeks. Body weight, respiration rate, water and food consumptions were recorded for each animal at the beginning of the experiment. The same parameters, as well as blood and urine parameters of control and experimental animals were recorded during the experiment after 72 h, 168 h and 336 h of housing in standard cages and metabolic cages. Urine collection was measured only in the experimental group. Rats weight decreased from 3.84 % to 18.59 % (P<0.05), respiration rate from 18.65 % to 24.59 % (P<0.05) when rats were housed in metabolic cages. Consumption of food and water by the rat depended on how long the animal was kept in metabolic cage. Glucose concentration increased on average by 15.37 %, WBC count decreased by 5.83 % in the blood of rats housed in metabolic cages compared to the animals housed in standard cages. We did not observe significant changes of triglycerides concentration, red blood cells count and total protein between all rats. The positive moderate correlation of rat housing in a metabolic cage was between K blood and K urine, P blood and P urine, Na blood and K blood, between Na urine and P urine and significant negative moderate correlation was determined between K urine and P urine. These present study findings indicate that metabolism cage housing significantly affects rat’s physiological parameters and potentially may influence animal health and wellbeing.

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Relation Between Microclimate and Air Quality in the Extensively Reared Turkey House

Abstract

Good air quality in poultry houses is crucial for animal health and productivity. In these houses, air is generally contaminated with noxious gases and microorganisms, the concentrations of which depend on numerous factors including microclimate. In this case study, the relation between microclimate and air concentrations of noxious gases and microorganisms was investigated in extensively reared turkey house. The study was carried out at a family household in Dalmatia hinterland, Croatia, with 50.3±3.1 turkeys kept in the house during the study period. Air temperature, relative humidity, airflow rate, concentrations of ammonia, carbon dioxide, bacteria and fungi in indoor air were measured three times per month from September to December, in the morning, prior to releasing turkeys out for grazing. Air temperature ranged from 9.73 to 26.98 °C, relative humidity from 63.29% to 75.08%, and airflow rate from 0.11 to 0.17 m/s. Lowest ammonia and carbon dioxide concentrations were measured in September (2.17 ppm and 550 ppm, respectively) and highest in December (4.50 ppm and 900 ppm, respectively). Bacterial and fungal counts were lowest in December (2.51×105 CFU/m3 and 3.27×103 CFU/m3 air, respectively) and highest in September (6.85×105 CFU/m3 and 1.06x105 CFU/m3 air, respectively). Air temperature and relative humidity showed negative correlation with concentrations of noxious gases and positive correlation with air microorganisms (P<0.05 all).

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Comparison of PUFA Profiles in the Blood and in Follicular Fluid and its Association with Follicular Dynamics after PGF Induced Luteolysis in Dairy Cows

Abstract

The objectives of the present study were to examine the fatty acid (FA) profiles in serum and in the follicular fluid (FF) and the association between polyunsaturated fatty acid level (PUFA) and follicular growth dynamics following induced luteolysis in dairy cows. A total of 29 dairy cows (CL>25mm, follicle≈15mm) at d0 (start of the experiment) were submitted to ultrasound guided transvaginal follicular aspiration for FF collection from the largest follicle and were injected with 500 μg of cloprostenol. The cows were subdivided into Group A1 (n=11) and Group A2 (n=8) resuming follicular growth either from a secondary follicle less than or larger than 8.5mm, respectively, present at the moment of aspiration and Group A0 (n=10) not resuming follicular growth. Follicular development was monitored daily by ultrasonography until the next dominant follicle reached ≈15mm and was subsequently punctured in Group A1 and A2 (d1). Serum and FF samples for FA determination were taken at d0 from all cows and at d1 in Group A1 and A2. No differences were observed between the FA profile in serum nor in FF between sampling days. Regarding the PUFA levels, the serum linoleic acid (C18:2n6) levels at d0 and d1 were significantly higher than in FF, while alpha linolenic acid (C18:3n3) was lower in the serum than in FF, both at d0 and d1. At d0, a tendency for negative correlation between serum and the FF C18:2n6 with subsequent daily follicular growth rate was observed, while, at d1 there was a strong negative correlation between the serum C18:2n6 and daily growth rate (r=−0.71; p=0.0006). The present study revealed similarities of the FA profiles in the serum and in the FF and association between serum and FF PUFA content with the follicular dynamics after induced luteolysis.

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The Evaluation of Brucella Spp. Isolation Rates in Ruminant Abortion Cases by Using Different Selective Media

Abstract

The aim of this study is to evaluate the success of Brucella spp. isolation in ruminant abortion cases by using different selective media. To this end, 58 samples from ruminant abortion cases were utilized. 4 selective media; namely, Farrell Medium (FM), CITA Medium (CM), Modified Thayer Martin (MTM) and Jones & Morgan (JM) were preferred for isolation. In addition to these, one medium with antibiotics was used to extend the range of the results. Suspensions prepared from organ and fetal stomach contents were inoculated to media plates and incubated at 37C° for 5-8 days in 5-10% CO2 condition. Conventional biotyping method was used to identify Brucella isolates within the level of species and biovar. MTM (67.2%) and Farrell (65.5%) outperformed the other media with regards to isolation rate. However, regarding the inhibition ability against contaminant microrganisms, Farrell (86.2%) and CITA (72%) have the highest and second highest percentages respectively. The media’s inhibition ability was examined in the samples in which Brucella spp. isolation occurred to be able to investigate the correlations between isolation and inhibition. Lower isolation percentage was observed in the samples in which the media displayed the lowest inhibition ability against contaminants. In this context, using two different selective media with high inhibition ability against contaminants may be recommended to enhance the isolation rate. Moreover, the components stimulating the growth of Brucella strains might be added to the media to obtain better results.

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