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Clay Sealings from the Pyramid Complex of King Raneferef Kept in the Náprstek Museum: General Features of the Corpus and its Potential to the Study of the Administration of the Royal Funerary Cult

Abstract

In the 1980s, the excavations of the Czechoslovak Institute of Egyptology headed by Miroslav Verner excavated large parts of the pyramid complex of King Raneferef (Neferefre)2 and uncovered evidence of the mortuary cult of the king, including ca. one thousand of clay sealings (or sealing fragments). Out of them, a corpus of over three hundred sealings was acquired by National Museum – Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures. In most aspects, they make a representative sample of the whole corpus. This paper presents in summary properties of the corpus relevant to the interpretation of the temple administration as it is reflected in the sealing activity.3 After a brief introduction to the site and the organization of the excavated corpus, the attention will be focused particularly on the general patterns of the distribution of sealings with regard to space, type, and attested epigraphical features (titles, names of gods and institutions, other iconographical features), as these are the means to uncover potential correlations between the activity of holders of particular offices (or representatives of particular institutions), particular parts of the temple and particular types of sealings (i.e. particular kinds of sealed containers).

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How are Creative Abilities Related to Meta-Learning Competences?

Abstract

This correlational study explored the relationship between creative abilities and selected meta-learning competences. The study was conducted among 250 first-year undergraduate and graduate students who solved the Test for Creative Thinking – Drawing Production and filled in the My Learning Questionnaire. The results demonstrate a statistically significant correlation between students’ awareness of their own learning and their creative abilities as well as a positive link between creative abilities and level of knowledge about human learning. These relationships were not moderated by the level of studies – the links among undergraduate and graduate students were similar in the case of self-awareness of learning and knowledge about learning.

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“Generic” Creativity as a Predictor or Outcome of Identity Development?

Abstract

In this brief commentary to Kaufman’s call for a “new agenda for positive outcomes” of creativity research, I emphasize how the broad construct of “identity” qualifies as such an outcome. While doing so, I challenge the issue of directionality (predictor vs. outcome) of creativity in relation to relevant correlates by outlining the influence of epistemological position and publication bias in directional interpretations of correlational findings. Through illustrations of various levels of relationships between creativity and identity, I also urge creativity researchers to be more explicit regarding how “generic” creativity is being operationalized in their study, so that more targeted hypotheses regarding the relationship between distinct aspects of creativity and such positive out-come variables may be formulated.

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Comparison of Competing Theories about Ideation and Creativity

Abstract

A measure of ideational behaviour, often used to estimate the potential for creative thinking, was administered to 796 children and their parents and teachers. Correlations among groups were explored. The data provided an opportunity to (a) compare four theories of creativity (a one-factor theory, 2 two-factor theories, and a three-factor theory) and (b) determine empirically how the measure of ideation should be scored (based on its empirical structure). Results of confirmatory factor analyses indicated that one of the twofactor theories (Process and Product) best fit the data and was useful for comparisons of the children and their parents and teachers. Practical implications of the differences between parents and teachers are explored. Any effort to fulfil creative potentials, for example, would probably be the most likely to succeed if children, parents, and teachers agreed, and just as probable are difficulties if the three groups disagreed or considered different things when judging creative potential. Limitations of the study are also discussed.

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Links Between Creative Performance and Post-Formal Thought

Abstract

The aim of this study is to reveal relations between creativity in design and the cognitive developmental stages of designers within a Post-Piagetian approach. In this study design processes were deeply inspected with the aim of obtaining more comprehensive information about the effects of individual’s cognitive status on the design processes, problemsolving and quality of idea generation . In this field, studies done so far have been conducted on test results as indicators of creativity. Withinthe present study, however, protocol analyses were also evaluated, in addition to test results, and thanks to this addition, it was possible to determine the qualitative and quantitative effects of cognitive developmental stages on creativity. A total of twenty-five students voluntarily participated in the research. To collect data, two different methods were employed. The Social Paradigm Belief Inventory (SPBI), was employed to determine students' cognitive stages and scores, and the Think-aloud protocol was used to elicit verbal reports of the thought sequences of the students. In order to analyse the verbal reports reflecting designers' cognitive activities, the method of Linkography was conducted and the general statistics of segments were measured. To assess the relations between creativity in design and the cognitive developmental stages of the designers, SPBI scores and the general statistical values obtained from the design sessions were correlated. Findings showed that there is a strong and significant correlation between the cognitive development levels and creativity, in favour of dialectical thinking.

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Creativity as Educational Objectives: From a Meta-theoretical Heuristic to Domain-specific Creative Behaviours

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the education expert and non-expert consensually rated nature of creativity operationalized as observable behaviour. When operationalized as observable behaviour akin to concrete educational objectives accessible to being taught, is creativity a construct valid both internationally and over time, and what are its distinguishing features? A representative sample of concretely stated behaviours descriptive of creativity displayed by children and adolescents was evaluated with high convergent validity by educational psychologists, specialists in gifted education, university students of teacher studies, and mathematics teachers (N = 208) on the level of creativity, and ten additional behaviour features. The results of the canonical correlation analysis suggest internationally and temporally stable and an educationally viable bridge between general creativity construct operationalization and measurement on the one hand, and the domain-specificity of creative behaviours and their features on the other. By viewing the general creativity construct as a meta-theoretical heuristic, and focusing on one group of domain-specific consensually rated creative behaviours and their progressive nature as educational objectives, the findings of this study are discussed in the context of general and gifted education.

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Creative Genius as Inherently Relevant and Beneficial: The View from Mount Olympus

cross-cultural and transhistorical survey. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 6, 259-277. Simonton, D. K. (1975b). Creativity, task complexity, and intuitive versus analytical problem solving. Psychological Reports, 37, 351-354. Simonton, D. K. (1975c). Interdisciplinary creativity over historical time: A correlational analysis of generational fluctuations. Social Behavior and Personality, 3 , 181-188. Simonton, D. K. (1975d). Sociocultural context of individual creativity: A transhistorical time-series analysis. Journal of Personality and

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Measuring the Aesthetic Success of Books: Can User-driven Databases Fill the Gap?

, S. K. (2002). Book value: Intertemporal pricing and quality discrimination in the US market for books. International Journal of Industrial Organization, 20, 1385-1408. Diedenhofen, B., & Musch, J. (2015). Cocor: A comprehensive solution for the statistical comparison of correlations. PLoS ONE, 10(4), 1-12. Diedrich, J., Benedek, M., Jauk, E., & Neubauer, A. C. (2015). Are creative ideas novel and useful? Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 9, 35-40. Form, S. (2017). Reaching wuthering heights with

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The Social “Cost” of Working in Groups and Impact on Values and Creativity

). Applied multiple regression/correlation analysis for the behavioral sciences . Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Costa, P. T. Jr., & McCrae, R. R. (1992). Four ways five factors are basic. Personality and Individual Differences, 13, 653-665. Dennis, A., & Gallupe, R. B (1993). A history of group support system empirical research: Lessons learned and future directions. In L. M. Jessup & J. S Valacich (Eds.), Group support systems: New perspectives (pp. 59-77). New York: MacMillan. Diehl, M., & Stroebe, W. (1987). Productivity loss in brainstorming groups

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A Bridge Too Far: Conceptual Distance and Creative Ideation

giftedness. Roeper Review, 16(4), 235-241. Shrout, P. E., & Fleiss, J. L. (1979). Intraclass correlations: Uses in assessing rater reliability. Psychological Bulletin, 86(2), 420. Simon, H. A. (1973). The structure of ill structured problems. Artificial Intelligence, 4(3-4), 181-201. Sowden, P. T., Clements, L., Redlich, C., & Lewis, C. (2015). Improvisation facilitates divergent thinking and creativity: Realizing a benefit of primary school arts education. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 9(2), 128

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