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Urban land restitution in Cape Town: demanding the return of land rights in Constantia and Kensington/Ndabeni

: Cash as compensation in South African land restitution. In : Canadian Journal of African Studies, Vol. 38 (3), pp. 672-687. Buford, W. and Van der Merwe, H., 2004: Reparations in Southern Africa. In Cahiers d’études Africaines, 44 (1-2). Available at: http://www.csvr.org.za/docs/ reconciliation/reparationsinsouthernafrica.pdf. DoA: 16 January 2014 Carruthers, J., 2000: Urban Land Claims in South Africa: The Case of Lady Selborne Township, Pretoria, Gauteng. In : African Historical Review, Vol. 32 (1), pp. 23

Open access
Moderation by Researchgate Related to Comments on “Predatory” Publishing Practices

Abstract

The intersection between academia and social media is gradually overlapping. The ability to vent personal and professional discord online, either through blogs or social media, has had both positive and negative consequences on academic communication, with the public and/or in the public domain. ResearchGate (RG) is one of the most popular academic social media sites that allows commenting, either in response to published papers or to questions that are posed on that platform. This paper explores an important aspect of a high-profile, topical and controversial 2017 paper (Derek Pyne; Journal of Scholarly Publishing; DOI: 10.3138/jsp.48.3.137) that had based itself on a flawed blacklist created by Jeffrey Beall. In that paper, unfounded claims were made regarding financial rewards as remuneration schemes at a “small business school” in Canada related to publishing papers in “predatory” journals, i.e., in open access journals that were blacklisted by Beall. Based on those claims, Pyne used RG as a platform to target academics at his research institute. Pyne could have, but did not, use the scholarly platform to engage with his colleagues in an academic debate about his controversial findings, causing personal disrepute on three occasions. Consequently, RG was contacted with a claim of defamation on each occasion. Within hours of each claim, Pyne’s comments were deleted. In early May, RG also erased his social media account. The issue of actual or potential insults in the public domain, such as on blogs, is rarely discussed, much less related to academic social media sites like RG. This case study, and the issues discussed herein related to social media more broadly, will be useful for academics to better navigate increasingly challenging publishing waters.

Open access
Introduction : Sacred Geographies and Identity Claims: The Revival of Sacred Sites in the Post-Soviet Space

References Aslan, Rose. 2014. The Museumification of Rumi’s Tomb: Deconstructing Sacred Space at the Mevlana Museum. – International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage 2 (2): 1–16. Dubuisson, Eva-Marie and Anna Genina. 2012. Claiming an Ancestral Homeland: Kazakh Pilgrimage and Migration in Inner Asia. – Movement, Power and Place in Central Asia and Beyond: Contested Trajectories , edited by Madeleine Reeves. Abingdon: Routledge, 111–127. Lefebvre, Henri. 1974. The Production of Space . Oxford: Blackwell. Meyer, Birgit and

Open access
Risk of Malpractice Claims and Changes in Professional Autonomy: A Qualitative Study of Obstetrician-Gynaecologists in Switzerland

Abstract

Based on interviews, this article explores how obstetrician-gynaecologists in Switzerland deal with and respond to the risk of malpractice claims. It describes the factors associated with the interviewees’ perceived increasing risk of litigation, as well as three attitudes towards the use of consent forms as a means of managing such a risk. This article suggests that the perceived risk of claims is closely linked to the physicians’ perception of how external regulation shapes their professional autonomy.

Open access
‘Because Migri Says So’:
Legitimation in Negative Asylum Decisions in Finland

Law Review , vol. 92, no. 2, pp. 637-677. Mezzadra, S & Neilson, D 2013, Border as method, or, the multiplication of labour , Duke University Press, Durham, London. Millbank, J 2009, ‘The ring of truth: a case study of credibility assessment in particular social group refugee determinations’, International Journal of Refugee Law , vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-33. Noll, G 2006, ‘Asylum claims and the translation of culture into politics’, Texas International Law Journal , vol. 49, no. 491, pp. 491-502. Pellander, S 2015, ‘“An acceptable marriage

Open access
The Impact of Russian Anti-Western Conspiracy Theories on the Status-Related Conflict in Ukraine: The Case of Flight MH17

Weaponization of Social Media , Copenhagen: Royal Danish Defence College. Retrieved from http://www.fak.dk/publikationer/Documents/The%20Weaponization%20of%20Social%20Media.pdf?pdfdl=theweaponizationofsocialmedia?pdfdl=TheWeaponizationOfSocialMedia [accessed 28 Feb 2019] O’Donoghue, R. (2017), “They were dead BEFORE it crashed’: Shock claim about doomed Flight MH17,’ Daily Star , 17 July. Retrieved from https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/630114/flight-mh17-malaysian-airlines-mh370-putin-corpses [accessed 19 Apr 2019] Pabriks, A. & Kudors, A. , eds

Open access
Revisiting the Importance of Distance in Transnational Family Lives:
How and why Danish migrant parents transmit ‘Danishness’ to their children settled in Australia

Abstract

In recent years, a body of research has aimed to ‘de-demonise’ distance in transnational family lives, arguing that transnational families compensate for physical co-presence with other means of caring and ‘being there’ for each other, particularly by way of new information and communication technologies (ICTs). Although many researchers claim to study transnational families, they mostly study the relationships between ageing parents in ‘home’ countries and the migrant son or daughter overseas. In this article, I propose to broaden that scope to include generations further apart too. In analysing how and why Danish migrant parents work to transmit their Danish culture and language to their children settled in Australia, I argue that geographical distance continues to matter, not least to the relationships between grandparents and grandchildren separated by this distance but also due to the complicated relationship between migrants and parents which is fostered by separation.

Open access
Lady into Fox (David Garnett, 1922): Un-Weaving a Tailor-Made Gender or Re-Taming the Shrew?

Abstract

One day, while going for a walk with her husband, the young Mrs Tebrick turns into a fox. At first, they both try to keep things the way they were. The lady-fox dresses, drinks tea and plays cards with her husband until she breaks herself free of conventions and opts for a wild life in the forest which Mr Tebrick apparently accepts, claiming an unchanged marital love. One wonders though whether this metamorphosis sincerely unwinds the tailor-made gender Mrs Tebrick had to endorse in her marriage and whether Mr Tebrick’s full freedom of speech honestly echoes an agonistic discourse revealing injustice, a courageous parrhesiastic protest against compulsory gendered structures, Parrhesia being, according to Foucault, a “transhistorical possibility we have” to speak up against the powerful. In other words: Is David Garnett critically re-gendering “The Shrew”, un-weaving a tailor-made gender, or simply re-taming her anew for a XXth century readership?

Open access
Restrictions of Russian Internet Resources in Ukraine: National Security, Censorship or Both?

Abstract

In this paper, the authors analyse the ambiguous political decision to ban the major Russian web resources from access to the Ukrainian market, in spite of heavy criticisms from local and foreign experts. While the supporters of the new internet policy claimed the new strategy to be coherent with cybersecurity priorities of the country, the opponents pointed out a set of legal and political limitations. Drawing on the setting and results of taking a new approach to information policy, we describe the fragility of Euromaidan democratic heritage and drawbacks of the current political regime. The logical method of legal interpretation has been applied to analyse the controversies of the current legislation on Russian internet resources restriction. The article concludes that Ukrainian post-Euromaidan governance model needs to consolidate the efforts in order to prove the commitment to freedom of speech as a core European value and replace spontaneous actions with an evidence-based approach to political decision-making.

Open access
A Critical and Theoretical Re-imagining of ‘Victimhood Nationalism’: The Case of National Victimhood of the Baltic Region

Abstract

There are many arguments to support the idea that the Baltic nations (and other “victimized” areas) adhere to ‘victimhood nationalism’, a form of nationalism that explains the region’s recognition of its history and the related problems. Since the start of the 21st century, memory and area studies experts have used the concept of ‘victimhood nationalism’. However, the framework of victimhood nationalism is critically flawed. Its original conceptual architecture is weak and its effectiveness as an explanatory variable requires critical examination. This paper presents a theoretical examination of victimhood nationalism from the perspective of political and social historiology. Further, the paper criticizes the concept from the perspective of the empirical area studies of the Baltic region. First, it argues that the killing or damaging of one community by another does not automatically transform into a nationalism of victimhood. Unless it has been established that one community was the ‘victim’ and the other the perpetrator of the crime, these events will not be remembered as the basis of victimhood nationalism. Second, the effectiveness of this concept is criticized from two perspectives: “tangle” as an explanatory variable and its doctrinal history. It is tautological to claim that victimhood nationalism explains political issues, as was already being implied in the early twentieth-century collective memory studies. In conclusion, the assumption of victimhood is a preliminary necessity to a community claiming victimhood nationalism. Victimhood nationalism is not an explanatory, but an explained, variable. Therefore, the concept should be renamed otherwise. The alternative framework of collective memory studies framework of “victimhood” is needed. This research argues that Baltic area studies, particularly regarding history recognition, should be phenomenologically reconsidered to reimagine the framework of “victimhood”.

Open access