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Introduction : Sacred Geographies and Identity Claims: The Revival of Sacred Sites in the Post-Soviet Space

References Aslan, Rose. 2014. The Museumification of Rumi’s Tomb: Deconstructing Sacred Space at the Mevlana Museum. – International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage 2 (2): 1–16. Dubuisson, Eva-Marie and Anna Genina. 2012. Claiming an Ancestral Homeland: Kazakh Pilgrimage and Migration in Inner Asia. – Movement, Power and Place in Central Asia and Beyond: Contested Trajectories , edited by Madeleine Reeves. Abingdon: Routledge, 111–127. Lefebvre, Henri. 1974. The Production of Space . Oxford: Blackwell. Meyer, Birgit and

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The Living Camera in the Ritual Landscape: The Teachers of the Tatuutsi Maxakwaxi School, the Wixárika Ancestors, and the Teiwari Negotiate Videography

.1215/9780822394037. Kindl, Olivia. 1997. La jícara huichola: un microcosmos mesoamericano. Tesís para optar por el titulo de Licenciada en Etnología. México D.F.: Escuela Nacional de Antropología e história I.N.A.H. Kwon, Miwon. 2002. One Place After Another: Site-specific Art and Locational Identity. Cambridge: The MIT Press. Liffman, Paul. 2011. Huichol Territory and the Mexican Nation: Indigenous Ritual, Land Conflict, and Sovereignity Claims. Tucson, AZ: The University of Arizona Press. Magga, Päivi. 2016. Como hacer visible lo

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The Israeli-Palestinian Separation Wall and the Assemblage Theory: The Case of the Weekly Rosary at the Icon of Our Lady of the Wall

). Weizman, Eyal. 2007. Hollow Land: Israel’s Architecture of Occupation. London: Verso. Yehudah, Elizur. 1978. The Borders of Eretz Israel in Jewish Tradition. - Whose Homeland: Eretz Israel Roots of the Jewish Claim. Jerusalem: Achva Press, 42-53. Zureik, Elia. 2001. Constructing Palestine through Surveillance Practices. - British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 28 (2): 205-227. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/13530190120083086.

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Exú’s Work – The Agency of Ritual Objects in Southeast Brazilian Umbanda

Abstract

This article* concentrates on the material side of religious intimacy in Afro-Brazilian Umbanda through an ‘ontographic’ perspective as well as looking at materiality as evidence. It is based on an eleven-month fieldwork period among devotees, clients and individual practitioners of Umbanda in Southeast Brazilian metropolises, especially in São Paulo. In people’s experiences of spiritual work (trabalho) and spiritual development (desenvolvimento) carried out with Exús – guardians, guides and protectors who have, after their death, returned in order to work for people’s wellbeing – ritual objects (such as bodies, clothes, beverages, herbs, cigarettes, candles, songs) are seen as constitutive in knowledge production and life transformation. The central claim in this article is that diverse material and immaterial objects through which Exús interact and materialise, are neither primarily symbolic nor representative, but are re-configurative.

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Alcohol Consumption Practices in the Koryak Community

Abstract

The article* is dedicated to the analysis of alcohol consumption practices within the Koryak ethno-cultural community. The aim of the article is to understand how the reasons for alcohol consumption are explained within the framework of the community. The analysis is based on the ideas of Durkheim’s social theory. The author of the article claims that the practice of consuming alcohol is essentially connected with the more archaic practice of mushroom consumption since both have a grounding in the Koryak perception of the world. The analysed models of behaviour stem from appropriate Koryak epistemology and ontology, which themselves are based on the notion of the ‘other world’ and communication with supernatural entities (spirits). The isomorphism of consuming alcohol and amanita intoxication reflects the inner core of this connection: the Koryak believe that an entity enters the human body and controls their actions. The transition from one type of intoxication to another is accompanied by drastic transformation of the materiality of the consumed product, which, in turn, leads towards social transformations. Such social changes are qualified as anomie by the author of the article. The visual materiality of the amanita mushroom dictated its symbolic anthropomorphism and creation of special rules for the treatment (amanita codex). The physical amorphousness of vodka does not imply the same intellectual work. The author claims that this factor was one of the reasons why the Koryak do not have social regulations about vodka consumption – which leads to mass alcoholism. It is possible that indigenous communities have difficulties in working out the required social regulations because of the complexities surrounding the non-utilitarian treatment of the unusual materiality of vodka.

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Drunkards and Singers: A Mongolian Battle of Sounds

Abstract

When I conducted fieldwork among the Darhad of northern Mongolia my informants repeatedly asserted that after a good singer’s performance even the most badly intoxicated lad stands still and keeps silent. In this article, I make three points in order to explain why this claim was made. In the first one, I show that the main concern about singing performance at social gatherings is not about revealing the singer’s inner emotional realm but rather about crafting a collective feeling that has the ability to make people temporarily shed their otherness and converge. The problem with drunkards lies in the fact that they are unable to participate and even noisily impede this rite of convergence. The main reason is that they are not sufficiently detached from their own inner realm. I then put the concept of noise in context, arguing that it forms the repulsive pole of a Mongolian sonic continuum. In my last point, I stress the fact that according to Mongolian linguistic ideology, noise brings misfortune to the entire community. That is why good singers must win their battle against drunkards.

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