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Cultural Opposition: Concepts and Approaches

, Maria. Lustration and Truth Claims: Unfinished Revolutions in Central Europe. Law & Social Inquiry , 1995, roč. 20, č. 1, s. 117–161. LUXMOORE, Jonathan a BABIUCH, Jolanta. The Vatican and the Red Flag: The Struggle for the Soul of Eastern Europe . London: Chapman, 2000. MAJOR, Patrick. Behind the Berlin Wall: East Germany and the Frontiers of Power. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. MARK, James. Society, Resistance and Revolution: The Budapest Middle Class and the Hungarian Communist State 1948–56. The English Historical Review , 2005, roč

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2 Youth Claiming Media Practices to Perceive and Cross Borders
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Enactment of the Vet Curricula in the Work Process

References Allais, S. (2012). Claims vs. practicalities: lessons about using learning outcomes. Journal of Education and Work, 25(3), 331-354. Allais, S. (2016). Occupational standards in the English speaking world: a dysfunctional product for export? In S. Bohlinger, T. Kim Anh Dang, M., & Klatt M. (Eds.). Education policy: Mapping the Landscape and Scope (pp. 435-460). Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Edition. Bagnall, R., & Hodge, S. (2017). Using an Epistemological Perspective to Understand Competence

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The Use of Hedging in Research Articles on Applied Linguistics

language skills and writing-relevant knowledge for memory during the development of writing skill. Journal of writing research, 3(1), 51-68. http://dx.doi.org/10.17239/jowr-2011.03.01.3 . Meyer, P. (1997). Hedging strategies in written academic discourse: Strengthening the argument by weakening the claim. In Markkanen, R., Schroder, H. (Eds.), Hedging and Discourse: Approaches to the Analysis of a Pragmatic Phenomenon in Academic Texts , pp.21-41. Berlin, New York: Walter de Gruyter. Myers, G. (1989). The pragmatics of politeness in scientific articles

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The Piano, A Perfect Musical Instrument – Beginnings and Evolution (18th – 19th Centuries)

Abstract

The 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century mark the emergence, development and affirmation of the piano as a complex instrument that shall take, in turns, the role of soloist instrument, claiming and being able to reach the sound variety of the orchestra, that of partner in chamber music assemblies or that of orchestra member. The emergence, improvement and qualitative performance acquisition adventure of the piano represents a fascinating history about human creativity and ingenuity serving art, beauty, sound expressivity refinement and improvement.

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Number 13 / Part I. Music. 5. Transdisciplinary Dimensions of Music Education: Terminological and Conceptual Approaches

Abstract

Complex and integrated nature of issues such as globalization, migration, interculturalism, environmental protection, information explosion, claims a transdisciplinary approach to education and music education. To cope with changes characteristic of the contemporary world, students need as generic skills: the ability to learn how to learn, ability and problem-solving assessment. Transdisciplinarity - involves such issues often highly complex, using tools and rules specific to certain science investigations using concepts of these sciences, but in other contexts. Students are interested in concrete problems faced in everyday life and looking for more of these explanations and practical solutions. To identify issues related to cross-disciplinary dimension of music education concepts will investigate disciplinary, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary are four arrows of a single bow: knowledge.

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Foreign-language teaching and studying in Chilean and Finnish classrooms as seen by teachers

Abstract

This article reports Chilean and Finnish foreign-language (FL) teachers’ perceptions of teaching and study realities in their own FL classrooms. Communicative language teaching (CLT) is used as the teaching–studying–learning methodological framework of an international KIELO project (= the acronym for Finnish “kieltenopetus” meaning “language teaching”), whose online survey was used to collect data for this article. We aim at answering the following research question: What are the FL teachers’ main approaches to teaching and studying in Chilean and Finnish FL classrooms and what is the FL classroom teaching and study reality like in these two countries? The data were collected from 83 Chilean and 147 Finnish FL teachers through an online survey covering 15 key themes of CLT and including 115 Likert-scale statements and 8 open-ended questions. In the descriptive data analysis, both Chilean and Finnish FL teachers claim that they encourage their students to use the target language considerably and that they use communicative oral tasks. For both groups of participants, however, teacher-centeredness and use of textbook score relatively high. The two-cluster analysis revealed a context-dependent cluster and a context-independent cluster. Context-dependent teachers tended to favor communicative oral tasks, real-life tasks and their own language tasks, whereas context-independent teachers favored more non-communicative tasks. Context-dependent teachers proved more student-centered than context-independent teachers. For Chilean and Finnish research participants, the use of mother tongue in foreign language classrooms appears to be an issue despite the growing need of foreign language communication.

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Metaphorical Nomination in IT Terminology in Lithuanian and English Languages

Abstract

Metaphorical nomination is peculiar in every language, it is related to reality and world view perception, it also reveals the traits of nation mentality. However, there are universal models of metaphorical nomination. In both languages, special concepts can be nominated according to similar areas, e.g. human body, its physiological and mental peculiarities, mode of life, fauna, flora, objects of natural world, etc.

The aim of this article is to analyse tendencies of metaphorical nominations in IT terminology in English and Lithuanian languages, reveal universalities and peculiarities of metaphorical nomination models. Research data of Lithuanian metaphorical terms and their English equivalents show that semantic loan-words constitute the major part of Lithuanian metaphorical terms. Consequently, their metaphorical meanings are borrowed but a substantial part of them are fairly motivated in the Lithuanian language and only a small part of them have a doubtful motivation. Having analysed various ways of metaphorical transference it is possible to claim that figurative nomination of concepts is the most universal with reference to flora names and items of mode of life. It is noted that there is a tendency to nominate concepts meaning particular objects in both English and Lithuanian languages whereas analogies of abstract things are less abundant.

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