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(Re)Claiming Voices: Digital Storytelling and Second Language Learners

Abstract

With almost five million English language learners in the United States, digital storytelling is increasingly being used in second language learning classrooms. As a teaching and learning strategy, digital storytelling can promote critical thinking, connect new content with prior knowledge, enhance memory, and foster confidence and motivation for learning. Digital stories possess unique narrative qualities that often center on identity negotiation and the ways culturally and linguistically diverse students make meaning out of their lives. Fostering hands-on, active learning, digital storytelling is an interactive way to include culturally and linguistically diverse students’ voices in a curriculum that may not easily represent them. Practical implementation of digital storytelling is included.

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Grammar as an “Art of Lettes” in Foreign Language Teaching (A Study of Teaching English Verb Tenses in Lower and Upper Secondary Schools)

Abstract

Introduction: This paper focuses on the issue of teaching verb tenses in Slovak lower and upper secondary schools – in particular, on teaching three grammatical tenses (Present Simple, Present Continuous, and Simple Present Perfect) and the learner’s ability to use them. It also identifies the mistakes made by the learners in the research sample, causes of their mistakes, and suggests ways of eliminating these errors.

Methods: The paper presents the research data collected using quantitative (questionnaire and achievement test) and qualitative (lesson observation and semi-structured interview) methods. The data are analysed, compared, and conclusions for school practice are drawn.

Results: The main research findings show how the three tenses are taught, identify the impact of the ways they are taught on the ability of lower and upper secondary school learners to use them, and outline the errors they commit. The authors seek to explain the errors and suggest possible ways of eliminating them.

Discussion: The current study is compared to research data presented by Gadušová and Harťanská (2002), Hlava (2012) and Lojová (2016). All of them consider the practical application of grammatical functions significant in spontaneous and meaningful communication.

Limitations: Regarding the limitations of the research findings, the research sample of five interviewed teachers is too small either to make generalizations or to claim that the conducted research is fully reliable.

Conclusions: The research findings demonstrate that teaching the verb tenses in lower and upper secondary schools lacks sufficient contextualised communicative activities for practising the discussed grammar items.

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Original research article. An Apolog(y) of the Profession

Summary

The history of the development of mankind is filled with examples which confirm that not everything has failed when everything has failed (R. P. Nogo). And actually, in every sphere of social life we can find people, who in the given temporal and social circumstances, have brought about a kind of rebirth and have helped in the awakening of new dreams and new desires to move forward. These individuals, whose souls have borne all the wounds of their people (and the profession they once claimed as their own), have inspired hope and a new energy (both) to those who had already given up and abandoned themselves to a quiet self-destruction.

These individuals, beacons of light of a particular time, with their words and deeds were an example of those who would not acquiesce to the existing order, but did not know how to move on. These beacons of light, raised high by Love, went forward and through their work mapped out the roads of further development and progress.

One such man, who has shed his light and lit up our physical education, is certainly Milivoje Matić.

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Moral Reciprocity, Ethics of Appropriation of Indigenous Medicinal Plant Knowledge and Associated Biopiracy

Abstract

Introduction: Although this paper deals mostly with the positive effects of a posthumanist worldview on environmental sustainability, partnership, or moral accountability in science and scientific research, it also promotes a new understanding of our educational practice in higher education. The ideas espoused have the ability to inspire educators at all levels to show students, future researchers or other professions about the importance of a progressive, holistic approach to our environment. We claim that being sensitive and caring for our environment is not only part of our moral and ethical responsibility, it is an inseparable aspect of our environmental education, our environmental intelligence. This paper discusses posthumanist1 reciprocity ethics in the context of traditional knowledge (TK) and the protection of indigenous traditional knowledge from commercial exploitation.

Methods: Instances of unethical bioprospecting and biopiracy were common throughout the turn of the 21st century and are discussed using cases in countries such as Cameroon, India, South Africa and Australia, where medicinal plant species were, are still a highly sought-after source of potent, pharmacologically active phytochemicals.

Results and discussion: The observed increase in regulations against bioprospecting on indigenous land in these countries as a result of intellectual property monopoly by big pharmaceutical companies is discussed in this paper along the lines of a ‘humanist vs posthumanist’ ontology. Patent exclusivity laws have historically marginalized the proprietary owners of indigenous traditional knowledge, creating a moral and ethical rift between those that seek to exploit this knowledge commercially and those from whom the knowledge originally comes from. This disconnection from nature and natural resources due to a humanistic approach2 to growth and development, often leads to environmental exploitation, exploitation of indigenous people and unsustainable commercial practices. Existing research and bioprospecting ethics that are practiced on indigenous lands must be questioned in their ability to provide mutually beneficial outcomes for all stakeholders.

Conclusions: The posthumanist approach to morality and research ethics is discussed in this paper as a possible and practical alternative to humanism along with the potential for posthumanist ethics to be a tool to shape legal frameworks and the policies that protect at-risk communities and their respective natural environments. Our current developmental trajectory as a collective species has us blurring the lines that separate the ‘human’ from the ‘non-human’ elements in our world as humanity grows towards a more technologically advanced but equally environmentally dependent people. Thus, the currently existing systems of ethics that govern the relationship between the ‘human’ and ‘non-human’ must be called into question. This paper aims to illustrate the positive effects of a posthumanist worldview on issues such as environmental sustainability, partnership, moral accountability and reciprocity ethics in the context of modern science and modern scientific research.

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Developing Students’ Language Competence and Essential 21st Century Skills for Future Employability: The Case of Latvia and Lithuania

the Use of Case Studies in Language Teaching at Secondary and University Level. A handbook . Graz: European Centre for Modern Languages/Council of Europe. Grigsby, Y., Theard-Griggs, C., & Lilly, C. (2015). (Re)Claiming voices: Digital storytelling and second language learners. Acta Technologica Dubnicae, 5 (1), 60-67. https://doi.org/10.1515/atd-2015-0034 Heinze, A., & Procter, C. (2004). Reflections on the use of blended learning. In Education in a Changing Environmen t. UK: University of Salford. Kaya, H. (2015). Blending technology with

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Impact Analysis of the Change in Personal Injury Regulation in Albania

References AON BENFIELD, Motor XL Market 2015, (2015). Collasson, S.D., Impact analysis of the change in bodily injury regulation in Spain(2015). Denuit, M., Mareshal, X., Pitrebois, S., Francois W.J.(2007). Actuarial Modelling of Claim Counts. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, England. Klugman, S.,Panjer, H.,&Willmot,G. (2004). Loss Models: From data to decisions. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York. Pitacco, E., Matematica e Tecnica Attuariale delle assicurazioni sulla durata di vita (2002

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Consumer Dispute Resolution: A Comparative Study between Indonesia and Common Law System Countries

Abstract

Since 2001, based on the mandate of Article 49 paragraph (1) of Law no. 8 of 1999 on Consumer Protection, BPSK (Badan Penyelesaian Sengketa Konsumen/Consumer Dispute Resolution Institution) has been established based on Presidential Decree No. 90/2001 on the establishment of BPSK in several cities in Indonesia. In some countries that embrace the Anglo Saxon legal system, consumer dispute cases are resolved by an institution called The Small Claims Court (SCC) and The Small Claims Tribunal (SCT). The difference in settlement through three institutions is that BPSK is a formal institution which resolves small disputes with low-cost, but does not limit the size of the lawsuit filed by consumers. On the other hand, SCT provides clear restrictions on claims that can be filed by consumers. At the completion done by SCC, the assemblies that resolved the case come from active and retired judges, while in BPSK the assemblies come from government, businessman and consumer with different backgrounds.

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Social and Political Theory of Social Movements for the Social State

Abstract

Social movements, as collective entities, develop to stand up against the existing institutional status quo with a view to its reformation or radical transformation, while the degree to which they are political depends on wider socio-political factors. The diverse action that evolved through their organized mobilization marked the radical transformation of political response, but also the type of state intervention. Social movements exactly because they constitute wider socio-political undertakings that aim to bring about changes in the social, political, economic but also cultural processes, which seek to annul or sideline established standardizations, are considered one of the most readily available ways to express political and social claims; here they are understood to be dynamic interventions in institutionally and structurally complete social systems as in the case of the social state. Within the context of political mobilization and collective social action, social movements functioned at two interrelated levels: the level of expansion, but also of redefinition of social intervention processes in order to achieve the goals of the social state, and the cultural level, a symbolic promotion, in order to establish a greater degree of social justice. Mobilization of resources, collective behaviour for making claims, even contentious action and transaction with institutions and authorities, constitute views of social transformation and political process in the context of the creation and development of the social state.

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Proposed Model for Measuring Customer Satisfaction with Telecommunications Services

Abstract

The aim of this article is to propose a model for measuring customer satisfaction in users of telecommunications services. The methodological design is quantitative descriptive and explanatory type, using a survey as data collection tool, with a sample of 415 users of telecommunications services (landline telephone, television and Internet services) in the city of Medellin. Among the results, it is found that the service in the Call Centers and timely response to requests, inquiries, or complaints, and an effective service are among the factors that have the most influence in the satisfaction of users of telecommunications services. In addition, it is noted that the perception of a favorable cost-benefit services is influenced by the offered plans and promotions, and the proper settlement of claims and applications in their companies, showing that these are issues that need to be strengthened in telecommunication services companies.

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Street Children’s Problem in Getting Education: Economic and Parental Factors

Abstract

Every child in this universe has the same right to get an education. However, some street children are not able to claim what they are supposed to obtain, such as the right to get a decent education and to play like other children, due to economic conditions which do not allow them to obtain their rights. The researchers attempt to facilitate them to develop their skills in English so that they can achieve their dreams. This research result indicates that most street children in Kendari undergo some financial and family problems which make them unable to afford education tuition fee. These problems appear to be the factors causing them to stop attending schools. Therefore, they prefer to be street children and work as street musicians, bearers, and parking attendants, for example to meet their day-to-day needs. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews. To analyze the data, qualitative method was employed.

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