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Cross-Cultural Casting in Britain: The Path to Inclusion, 1972-2012

Abstract

This essay uses three productions to chart the progress of the integration of performers of African and Afro-Caribbean descent in professional British Shakespearean theatre. It argues that the three productions―from 1972, 1988 and 2012―each use cross-cultural casting in ways that illuminate the phases of inclusion for British performers of colour. Peter Coe’s 1972 The Black Macbeth was staged at a time when an implicit colour bar in Shakespeare was in place, but black performers were included in the production in ways that reinforced dominant racial stereotypes. Temba’s 1988 Romeo and Juliet used its Cuban setting to challenge stereotypes by presenting black actors in an environment that was meant to show them as “real human beings”. The RSC’s 2012 Julius Caesar was a black British staging of Shakespeare that allowed black actors to use their cultural heritages to claim Shakespeare, signalling the performers’ greater inclusion into British Shakespearean theatre.

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“A Pattern for Princes to Live by”: Popery and Elizabethan History During England’s Exclusion Crisis, 1679-1681

. Eliz Cap. 1. An Act Whereby Certain Offences be Made Treason. 4: 526-528. Print. Phillips, John. The Character of a Popish Successor and what England May Expect from such a One: Part the Second. London, 1681. Print. Poole, Ross. “Memory, History, and the Claims of the Past.” Memory Studies 1. (2008): 149-166. Print. Rose, Jacqueline. Godly Kingship in Restoration England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Print. ---. “Robert Brady’s Intellectual History and Royalist Antipopery in Restoration

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Performing Arabness in Arab American Stand-up Comedy

Abstract

This article deals with the dramatic art of stand-up comedy. It locates Arab American stand-up comedy within a broader American humorous tradition and investigates the way Arab American performers use this art to negotiate and (re)construct their identity. The main question in this article is the way Arab American stand-up comedians define their relationship to the Arab and the western worlds in the process of establishing their Arab American identity. Three humor theories - the relief theory, the incongruity theory, and the superiority theory - are deployed in the study to examine the representation of Arabness in selected Arab American performances. The study argues that Arab American comics minstrelize their own diasporic origin through reinscribing a range of orientalizing practices in order to claim their Americanness.

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Leisure Traveling for 21st Century Americans: Mass Tourism as a Cultural Trap

Abstract

The majority of mass men in the American environment exhibit predictable and similar patterns of behavior as tourists. Pre-Industrial Revolution modes of traveling as liberation and exploration are now thwarted by the leveling effect of globalization and the illusion of information fueled by the all-pervasive mass media. Claims about the role of routine or the quest for authenticity are challenged as genuine motivations for mass tourism. Both the American culture and travel destinations in developing countries have authentic content that is largely ignored in favor of sensationalism and cliché. Excessive regimentation in the US creates the acute need for transcending to which popular culture finds accessible solutions through tourism: an experience of concentrated yet vague exoticism which feels liberating without yielding exploration. Travel destinations are shaped to American standards of material comfort and even adopt western popular culture icons in an effort to supply accessible familiar experiences of western entertainment. Various kinds of difficulty that once stimulated travelers are now relieved by travel agencies, rendering the experience of traveling less personal and more like TV entertainment. Old notions of space, time and reality itself are blurred in favor of a hyper-reality where fiction dominates.

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“I’m a I’m a Scholar at the Moment”: The Voice of the Literary Critic in the Works of American Scholar-Metafictionists

Abstract

In her seminal book on metafiction, Patricia Waugh describes this practice as an obliteration of the distinction between “creation” and “criticism.” This article examines the interplay of the “creative” and the “critical” in five American metafictions from the late 1960s, whose authors were both fictional writers and scholars: Donald Barthelme’s Snow White, John Barth’s Lost in the Funhouse, William H. Gass’s Willie Masters’ Lonesome Wife, Robert Coover’s Pricksongs and Descants and Ronald Sukenick’s The Death of the Novel and Other Stories. The article considers the ways in which the voice of the literary critic is incorporated into each work in the form of a self-reflexive commentary. Although the ostensible principle of metafiction is to merge fiction and criticism, most of the self-conscious texts under discussion are shown to adopt a predominantly negative attitude towards the critical voices they embody – by making them sound pompous, pretentious or banal. The article concludes with a claim that the five works do not advocate a rejection of academic criticism but rather insist on its reform. Their dissatisfaction with the prescriptivism of most contemporary literary criticism is compared to Susan Sontag’s arguments in her essay “Against Interpretation.”

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“This England”: Re-Visiting Shakespearean Landscapes and Mediascapes in John Akomfrah’s The Nine Muses (2010)

Abstract

The paper will offer a reading of John Akomfrah’s The Nine Muses (2010), a 90-minute experimental feature film that has been defined as “one of the most vital and original artistic responses to the subject of immigration that British cinema has ever produced” (Mitchell). It will focus on the multifarious ways in which the film makes the “canonical” literary material that it incorporates, including Shakespeare, interact with rarely seen archival material from the BBC regarding the experience of Caribbean and South Asian immigrants in 1950s and 1960s Britain. It will argue that through this interaction the familiarity of Western “canonical” literature re-presents itself as an uncanny landscape haunted by other stories, as a language that is already in itself the “language of the other” (Derrida). In particular, it will claim that Shakespearean fragments are often used in an idiosyncratic way, and they repeatedly resonate with some of the most fundamental ethical and political issues of the film, such as the question of England as “home” and migration. The paper will also argue that the decontextualization and recontextualization of these fragments makes them re-emerge as part of an interrogation of the mediality of the medium, an interrogation that also offers insights into the circulation of Shakespeare in the contemporary mediascape.

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Canons and Heroes: The Reception of the Complete Works Translation Project in Finland, 2002-13

]. Parnasso 6-7 (2013): 32-40. Nortela, Mikko. “Kuninkaallista draamaa nykysuomeksi” [Regal Drama in Modern Finnish.]. Karjalainen . 22 August 2004: n.p. Orgel, Stephen. “The Desire and Pursuit of the Whole”. Shakespeare Quarterly , 58:3 (2007).290-310. Web. Accessed 24 September 2015. Paloposki, Outi and Kaisa Koskinen. “A Thousand and One Translations: Revisiting Translation”. Claims, Changes and Challenges in Translation Studies : Selected Contributions From the EST Congress, Copenhagen 2001 . Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Co, 2004: 27

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Cross-Cultural Variation in the Use of Hedges and Boosters in Academic Discourse

Language Writing 6 (1997), 183-205. Print. Hyland, Ken and Polly Tse. “Metadiscourse in academic writing: A reappraisal.” Applied Linguistics 25 (2004), 156-177. Print. Ivanič, Roz. Writing and Identity: The Discoursal Construction of Identity in Academic Writing. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1998. Print. Martin-Martin, Pedro. “The mitigation of scientific claims in research papers: A comparative study.” IJES 8/2 (2008), 133-152. Print Mauranen, Anna. “Contrastive ESP Rhetoric: Metatext in Finnish

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Spontaneous Use of Vocabulary Learning Strategies

Spontaneous Use of Vocabulary Learning Strategies

The paper argues that language learners employ learning strategies naturally. To corroborate the claim it presents a research on vocabulary learning strategies and provides a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the findings and concludes with some pedagogical suggestions.

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Locus amoenus or locus horridus: The Forest of Arden as a setting in As you like it

Locus amoenus or locus horridus: The Forest of Arden as a setting in As you like it

As you like it stands out from the rest of Shakespeare's plays as a comedy of conspicuously unusual dramaturgy. Critics have vindicated its idiosyncratic form claiming that As you like it's uneventful plot is due to the pastoral character of the play. Along with such typically pastoral elements as song contests or lover's woes they have listed its setting as an example of an idyllic locus amoenus. This article examines the actual character of the Forest of Arden and turns readers' attention towards the equivocal image of the place.

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