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Claim for identity or personality face: The Oscar winners' dilemma

Abstract

The research is concerned with contrasting regularities vs. ambiguities in identity and quality face construction by Oscar winners in their acceptance speeches. The concept of “face” is viewed here from evaluative, socio-contextual, and interactive perspectives. The research focuses on determining the identity (social) and quality (personal) faces of the awardees as specified by the sets of the corresponding role invariants.

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Religious ideologemes in transition: A residue of theological virtues in the emotionalist ethics of Victorian novels

Abstract

The study investigates the transition mechanisms of religious ideologemes observed in their lexical representation in the Victorian novel corpus. The paper claims that the amalgamation of Anglo-Catholic and Evangelical ideologies made for the subsequent transformation of theological virtues resulting in their internalized translation to the rising ideology of emotionalist moral values.

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Individual Speech Behavior of Russian-Speaking Prosecutors in the 19-20th Centuries: A Case Study in Implicit Pragmatics

vzyatochnikov i raskhititelej na transporte. In Sudebnyye rechi sovetskikh obvinitelej. Sbornik. Aleksandrov G.N. &Finn E.A. (sost.). Мoskva, s. 70-83. / Красиков П.А. Дело по обвинению взяточников и расхитителей на транспорте. Судебные речи советских обвинителей . Сборник. Александров Г.Н., Финн Э.А. (сост.). Москва, c. 70-83. Kravchenko, N. &Pasternak, T. (2018). Claim for identity or personality face: The Oscar winners’ dilemma. In Lege artis. Language yesterday, today, tomorrow. The journal of University of SS Cyril and Methodius in Trnava . Warsaw: De Gruyter Open

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Translating emotion-related metaphors: A cognitive approach

Abstract

The paper explores the existence of cognitive linguistics principles in translation of emotion-related metaphorical expressions. Cognitive linguists (Lakoff & Johnson, 1980; Lakoff, 1987) define metaphor as a mechanism used for understanding one conceptual domain, target domain, in terms of another conceptual domain, source domain, through sets of correspondences between these two domains. They also claim that metaphor is omnipresent in ordinary discourse. Cognitive linguists, however, also realized that certain metaphors can be recognized and identified in different languages and cultures whereas some are language- and culture-specific. This paper focuses on similarities and variations in metaphors which have recently become popular within the discipline of Translation Studies. Transferring and translating metaphors from one language to another can represent a challenge for translators due to a multi-faceted process of translation including both linguistic and non-linguistic elements. A number of methods and procedures have been developed to overcome potential difficulties in translating metaphorical expressions, with the most frequent ones being substitution, paraphrase, or deletion. The analysis shows the transformation of metaphorical expressions from one language into another and the procedures involving underlying conceptual metaphors, native speaker competence, and the influence of the source language.

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