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An Inquiry into the Theory of the Matrix: Subjectivity, Gaze, and Desire in Kristina Inčiūraitė’s Video the Meeting (2012)

Summary

This article deals with the Matrix theory of subjectivity, gaze, and desire by feminist scholar Bracha Lichtenberg Ettinger. Matrixial framework is explored in comparison to Lacanian psychoanalysis. The essay denotes the differences between split Lacanian model of the subject and Matrixial subjectivity based on plurality and continuity. I argue that Lacanian model which grounds the subject in fundamental lack and loss of corporal reality is insufficient for explaining specifically feminine experience in terms of temporality and collective memory, whereas the Matrix theory provides a conceptual apparatus for positive female identification and alliances between the past and the present. Ettinger’s Matrixial model is applied in the analysis of the 2012 video The Meeting by contemporary Lithuanian artist Kristina Inčiūraitė. I claim that the mode of desire in The Meeting is based on Matrixial gaze, which allows to formulate memory as co-created by two partners who share archaic knowledge of the Real, grounded in common relation to female sexual difference and intrauterine condition. Therefore, the article interprets the imagery of the town of Svetlogorsk in the video as coemerged mental images that affect each of the partners. I conclude that the Matrix theory overcomes the phallocentrism of classical psychoanalysis, allowing to reformulate the subject in terms of connectivity, compassion, and abilities to process Other’s trauma through positive cultural change.

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Cultural Opposition: Concepts and Approaches

, Maria. Lustration and Truth Claims: Unfinished Revolutions in Central Europe. Law & Social Inquiry , 1995, roč. 20, č. 1, s. 117–161. LUXMOORE, Jonathan a BABIUCH, Jolanta. The Vatican and the Red Flag: The Struggle for the Soul of Eastern Europe . London: Chapman, 2000. MAJOR, Patrick. Behind the Berlin Wall: East Germany and the Frontiers of Power. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. MARK, James. Society, Resistance and Revolution: The Budapest Middle Class and the Hungarian Communist State 1948–56. The English Historical Review , 2005, roč

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Summer Retreats, Travel, and Family in the Life of František Lexa (1876–1960), The First Czechoslovak Egyptologist

Abstract

The study will explore the family and the family milieu of the first Czechoslovak Egyptologist František Lexa, founder and first director of the Czechoslovak Institute of Egyptology, expert on Egyptian philology, especially demotic languages, and mentor of two important Egyptologists, Jaroslav Černý, professor at Oxford University, and Zbyněk Žába, professor at Charles University, Prague. The study will analyse the social status of Lexa’s family and the importance of his marriage in shaping his scientific life and consider the everyday routines of this scientist’s household, including the claims demanded by the requirements of bringing up three children. As a specific focus, we will try to introduce the everyday life of a travelling scientist, particularly during holidays spent with family abroad, and illuminate the significance of summer retreats in shaping a scientists’ familial travel experience.

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Potential Mechanisms Underlying the Impact of Imaginative Play on Socio-Emotional Development in Childhood

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to weigh the empirical and hypothetical evidence to assess the claim that imaginative play supports the acquisition and development of social and emotional competence. We analyse children’s play and social skills using a development-based perspective. On this basis, we describe the developmental trajectories of imaginative play and the components of socio-emotional competence during childhood, especially in the pre-school period. In addition, we review the research literature on the possible link between imaginative play and creativity in children, and on how this type of play is predictive of later life creativity. Finally, we discuss hypothetical mechanisms that may account for the relationship between imaginative play and social competence in the preschool years and beyond.

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In Defence of Lost Causes: Counter(F)Actual Recasting of Biographies in Polish Contemporary Theatre

Summary

This article considers the impact of counterfactual strategies on the most recent Polish theatrical practices dealing with biographies of “historical” figures. The re-occurrence of these past agents on the stage will be viewed in light of the biographical turn in the humanities as well as from the perspective of Jacques Derrida’s concept of hauntology. Seemingly, both trends share a need to create an alternative space for the expression of a contemporary self which is marked by disunity and disintegration. Subjects of current semi-biographical projects are those whose voices have once been neglected, marginalised, or oppressed because of their gender, social background, or political views. This account examines the ways in which counterfactual strategies enable us to grasp the polyphonic condition of a modern subject and to see, in traces left by different Other(s), touchstones for social and political change. By taking the play Tu Wersalu nie będzie! (No Versailles over here!) by Rabih Mroué as the core case study of the analysis, I aim to demonstrate how counterfactual strategies animate emancipatory potential ascribed to the arrival of the phantom of controversial Polish politician Andrzej Lepper. His death in unknown circumstances becomes a point of divergence in which Lepper’s existence layers into counterfactual scenarios. Counterfactual strategies enable many approaches to view Lepper’s figure without the ethically dubious act of speaking in his name. By unsettling claims of truth, counterfactual strategies unravel how “facts” about Lepper resurfaced in mass media, thereby constructing his stereotyped and over-generalised image. The play has a form of investigation which, by employment of counterfactualism, reenacts the oppression of a mainstream media discourse against the disturbing Other epitomised by Lepper.

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Shaping Strömsö: Examining Elements in a Creative Process for the Design of New Television Content

/intolerance for uncertainty as predictors of creativity. Psychology in Russia: State of the Art, 3, 240-256. doi:10.11621/pir.2010.0012 Levine, K. J., Heuett, K. B., & Reno, K. M. (2015). Re-operationalizing established groups in brainstorming: Validating Osborn’s claims. The Journal of Creative Behavior, 51 (3), 252-262. doi:10.1002/jocb.122 Madjar, N., Oldham, G. R., & Pratt, M. G. (2002). There’s no place like home? The contributions of work and nonwork creativity support to employees’ creative performance. Academy of Management Journal, 45 (4), 757-767. doi

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The Political Banner, a Material Memory of the Public Space A Contribution to the Museum’s Collecting of the Present

Abstract

The paper deals with the documentation of the current political protests and demonstrations in the context of the museum’s work and the material culture. It focuses on the documentation of the political banners used in demonstrations and the preservation of the selected banners as part of a museum collection. It further outlines the possibilities of using a political banner as a source of information on political protests, which take place in the physical public space: more specifically, information on the statements, claims and attitudes of the demonstrators; the iconography of the protest; the identity of the demonstrators as well as the links between them and their hierarchy.

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The Piano, A Perfect Musical Instrument – Beginnings and Evolution (18th – 19th Centuries)

Abstract

The 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century mark the emergence, development and affirmation of the piano as a complex instrument that shall take, in turns, the role of soloist instrument, claiming and being able to reach the sound variety of the orchestra, that of partner in chamber music assemblies or that of orchestra member. The emergence, improvement and qualitative performance acquisition adventure of the piano represents a fascinating history about human creativity and ingenuity serving art, beauty, sound expressivity refinement and improvement.

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Number 13 / Part I. Music. 5. Transdisciplinary Dimensions of Music Education: Terminological and Conceptual Approaches

Abstract

Complex and integrated nature of issues such as globalization, migration, interculturalism, environmental protection, information explosion, claims a transdisciplinary approach to education and music education. To cope with changes characteristic of the contemporary world, students need as generic skills: the ability to learn how to learn, ability and problem-solving assessment. Transdisciplinarity - involves such issues often highly complex, using tools and rules specific to certain science investigations using concepts of these sciences, but in other contexts. Students are interested in concrete problems faced in everyday life and looking for more of these explanations and practical solutions. To identify issues related to cross-disciplinary dimension of music education concepts will investigate disciplinary, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary are four arrows of a single bow: knowledge.

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