Search Results

1 - 10 of 91 items :

  • "argumentation" x
  • Sociology, other x
Clear All
A Far-reaching Shift in Argumentation: Parliamentary Debates on (post-)socialist Agricultural Cooperatives in the 1990s

Abstract

The debate as to whether Slovak post-socialist agricultural cooperatives are cooperatives or not represents one of the focal points of their post-1989 development. The answer to this question determined and/or legitimized the rationale for the legislative framework concerning their post-socialist transformation. This analysis draws mainly on data from the parliamentary debates that preceded the enactment of three pivotal laws. In comparing the debates in 1991/1992 and 1995, the examination focuses on the shift in the argumentation put forward by representatives speaking on behalf of cooperative farms. A dramatic shift in reasoning about the character of cooperative enterprises and appropriate voting rights is interpreted as a pragmatic, effect-oriented action. It is argued that both delicate work with the hybrid nature of post-socialist cooperative farms as well as the initial withholding of cooperative principles contributed to the preservation of the specific kinds of agricultural cooperative, and consequently also large corporate farm, which now exist in Slovakia.

Open access
Stakeholders’ arguments for and against moving Swedish substance abuse treatment to the health care system: How a fat reform proposal became a thin government bill

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND - Far-reaching changes in the Swedish substance abuse treatment system (SAT) were proposed by a state-commissioned inquiry in 2011. The proposal implied a break with the social tradition of SAT. It was suggested that the treatment responsibility should be transferred from the municipal social services to the regional-level health care system; and that compulsory treatment in its present form (assessed by/paid for by social services, run by the state) should be abolished and become incorporated into coercive psychiatric care provided by health care. A lively debate arose, and the vast majority of stakeholders sought to articulate their arguments. AIM - The study analysed the development of Swedish SAT by examining the policy process from reform proposal to government bill in 2013.

METHOD - Content analysis was used to analyse written comments on the proposal submitted to the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs by close to 200 stakeholders. The goal was to empirically chart and examine the arguments for and against as well as advocates and opponents of the reform. With the government bill at hand, we retrospectively sorted out the winning arguments in the now highly contested SAT field and which actors were able to influence the process.

CONCLUSIONS - The article discloses that the mixed response and rather critical voices in most groups, including social/medical professions and government bureaucracy, helped block the responsibility shifts, and that reformations of subsystems like SAT are difficult to carry out as freestanding projects within larger systems of social and health care

Open access
Dual Citizenship in an Era of Securitisation:
The Case of Denmark

Abstract

This article uses the case of Denmark to critically discuss key assumptions in the theoretical literature on dual citizenship. When Denmark surprisingly accepted dual citizenship in 2015, the decision reflected two distinct lines of argument: first, accepting dual citizenship would allow Danes living abroad to keep their Danish citizenship; second, because it is considered illegitimate to make people stateless, allowing dual citizenship would simultaneously allow for citizenship revocation of dual citizens who engage in or support acts of terror. This rationale stands in striking contrast to how dual citizenship has been previously theorised. The gradual acceptance of dual citizenship in Western countries since the early 1990s has been seen either as a symptom of a post-national era or as a pragmatic adjustment to the transnational realities of international migration. By contrast, the case of Denmark shows that dual citizenship may serve as a lever to protect the political community of the nation-state from terrorism and, as such, function as a tool of securitisation.

Open access
Islam and Muslims as Elephants in the Interfaith Room:
Frame governance of dialogue and de-radicalisation

2008, Regulating aversion: tolerance in the age of identity and empire , Princeton University Press, Princeton. Cesari, J 2013, Why the west fears Islam: an exploration of Muslims in liberal democracies, Palgrave Macmillan, New York. Dornhof, S 2012, ‘Rationalities of dialogue’, Current Sociology , vol. 60, no. 3, pp 382-398. DOI:10.1177/0011392111426190. Døving, CA 2012, ‘The Hijab debate in the Norwegian press: secular or religious arguments?’, Journal of Religion in Europe, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 223-243. DOI:10.1163/187489212X639208

Open access
Universalism against particularism. Kettil Bruun and the ideological background of the Total Consumption Model

References Anttila, A.-H. & Sulkunen, P. (2001): The inflammable alcohol issue: alcohol policy argumentation in the programs of political parties in Finland, Norway and Sweden from the 1960s to the 1990s. Contemporary Drug Problems 28:49-86 Babor, T. & Caetano, R. & Casswell, S. & Edwards, G. & Giesbrecht, N. & Graham, K. & Grube, J. & Gruenewald, P. & Hill, L. & Holder, H. & Homel, R. & Österberg, E. & Rehm, J. & Room, R. & Rossow, I. (2003): Alcohol: No Ordinary Commodity. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Open access
The controversial discourse on beer in Iceland

References Anttila, A.-H. & Sulkunen, P. (2001): The inflammable alcohol issue: alcohol policy argumentation in the programs of political parties in Finland, Norway and Sweden from the 1960s to the 1990s. Contemporary Drug Problems 28/Spring 49-86 Babor, T. & Caetano, R. & Casswell, S. & Edwards, G. & Giesbrecht, N. & Graham, K. & Grube, J. & Hill, L. & Holder, H. & Homel, R. & Livingston, M. & Österberg, E. & Rehm, J. & Room, R. & Rossow, I. (2010): Alcohol: No Ordinary Commodity. Research and Public Policy

Open access
Ethnography and psychoanalysis

This methodological essay describes and advocates using certain psychoanalytic techniques for ethnography. It focuses on the self analysis of the ethnographer using evenly hovering attention, dream analysis, and free association. It presents an argument that using those techniques enhances the goal of ethnography as a human science and of social research. Fear of crime serves as a point of departure for the methodological argument. Finally, it links psychoanalytic ethnography to a fractal model of society and the self with reference to C. S. Peirce’s theory of semiotics as a link between the individual and society.

Open access
JA ES BŪTU SMUKS, ES GRIBĒTU BŪT MEITENE! (‘If I Were Pretty, I Would Like To Be A Girl!’). Debating Transsexualism In The Latvian Parliament

Abstract

The article investigates a debate on the issues of legal recognition of gender which took place in the Latvian Parliament in 2009 and which is considered a rich source of material for a two-fold analysis. As an example of gendered discourse, it shows the differences between female and male MPs’ ways of tackling this uncomfortable subject. As a discourse about gender, which allows one to study the speakers’ arguments and attitudes, it reveals prejudice, lack of knowledge and conservative thinking. The analysis thus illustrates the language and arguments employed in the public sphere when discussing face-threatening, taboo topics.

Open access
Postfeminist Fiction in Chick Lit Novels

Abstract

The intersection of postfeminist arguments with popular culture and popular cultural forms is of great significance for investigating representational politics and issues of identity. These elements are central for capturing the concept of feminist heterogeneity in its engagement with cultural theory, particularly postmodernism. This study considers postfeminism’s redefinition and reevaluation of popular culture, as an area of political and emblematic contestation.

Open access