Search Results

1 - 6 of 6 items :

  • "argumentation" x
  • Commercial Law, other x
Clear All
CEDAW in the Eyes of the United States

Abstract

Despite the large number of reservations registered by Member countries, making it one of the, if not the, most heavily reserved human rights treaties; the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) has managed to achieve a very high rate of states’ membership [1]. Currently, 187 countries out of the 193 United Nations Members are parties to CEDAW [2]. What is strange to digest, however, is the fact that the United States is one of the seven countries that are yet to ratify the Convention [3]. This article provides an insight into the position of the United States from the ratification of CEDAW. It examines the merits of arguments made for and against the ratification and their rationale to provide a better understanding that explains what is considered by many as a buzzling stand of the United States from the Convention.

Open access
Avoiding Double Taxation Through The Assessment of International Tax Treties. Case: ESP’s versus Anaf Braşov

Countries and International Cooperation on Income Tax Matters: An Historical Review, unpublished manuscript, 2005. 9. Musgrave, R.A. (1960). Criteria for Foreign Tax Credit, in Baker et al. (eds), Taxation and Operations Abroad, Symposium Conducted by the Tax Institute, December 3-4, Princeton, Tax Institute. 10. Musgrave, P.B. (1969). US Taxation of Foreign Investment and Income: Issues and Arguments, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Law School. 11. Panayi, C. (2007). Double Taxation, Tax Treaties, Treaty Shopping and the European Community, Kluwer Law

Open access
Are Empires Striking Back? A Political and Cultural Comparison of the European Union and Russia

Abstract

The article is a position paper focusing on the current standoff between two regional powers, the European Union and Russia. Following a series of crises, in particular the annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation in 2014, the relationship between Russia and many of its neighbours has significantly deteriorated. This shift has led to various geopolitical opinions, often opposite and seemingly irreconcilable. A holistic and historical approach to this new reality leads some to question the validity of the current world order through the prism of the anachronistic concept of Empires. Subsequent to a review of definitions, the author analyses historical characteristics and political factors of the two territories on focus: the European Union and Russia. There are two outcomes of this study: On the one side, the European Union has become an organisation that shares many characteristics of an Empire, but several key elements exclude it from this political construction. On the other side, the geopolitical actions of Russia have shaped the position of the country into a structure that bears many of the artefacts of an Empire with key essential features. The conclusion of this argument states that the European Union is not an Empire by design, despite many resembling features; whilst Russia lives in an anachronistic paradigm of an Empire, without having the means of being one.

Open access
Enhancing the Value of Lifestyle Bundles

Abstract

Research purpose. The study of marketing a lifestyle offering involves allowing brands from different categories to collaborate in giving, essentially, a new offering as a bundle to consumers. This is particularly important for brands operating in segments that have a significant loyalty or in segments that have become or are becoming commodities. A lifestyle offering can span categories and address latent consumer attitudes such as aspiration and convenience. Lifestyle bundles were introduced as a “way of life that individuals express by choosing to allocate their time and personal resources to a single package of two or more goods or services that they believe represent their current or desired way of life” (Levens, 2010). The initial research on lifestyle bundles was contextualized through a bundled multi-category luxury offering, targeting affluent consumers, which was built on the concepts of luxury marketing, bundling and the needs, attitudes and behaviours of affluent consumers. The bundle items include a home, a vehicle and a vacation club. This paper revisits the original work on this topic and explores ways to enhance interest in the underlying bundle proposition.

Design / Methodology / Approach. The methodology to explore enhancements to the lifestyle bundles involved re-analyzing the data cube used to develop the inaugural lifestyle bundle research (Levens, 2010). The data cube was mined to identify individual preferences to increase consumer interest in the original concept. The underlying argument is that adjusting the lifestyle bundle items may increase consumer interest in the overall concept. The analysis presented in this paper was completed through statistical description using SPSS software.

Findings. The initial concept evaluation identified a non-trivial level of interest in the lifestyle bundle consisting of a home, a vehicle and a vacation club. This paper identifies modifications to the bundles that would increase consumer interest among rejecters and supporters of the lifestyle bundle concept. While novelty was acknowledged as a reason for consumer interest, it was clear that utility derived from convenience and lifestyle expression was the basis for many consumers supporting the concept. Concept rejecters also noted these attributes as influencing their opinions. Elimination of the vacation club offer from the lifestyle bundle would have the greatest impact on increasing rejection. Adding home and vehicle insurance to the lifestyle bundle would have the greatest impact on enhancing the value proposition for concept supporters.

Originality / Value / Practical implications. Lifestyle bundles are a novel approach for marketers to differentiate their products and create new opportunities among consumers who might have not previously considered their products or services. Enhancing the lifestyle bundle offer can only increase those opportunities.

Open access
Pedagogy of Financial Education among College Students

Services Review, (11(3)), 289-307. Davies, M. (2011). Concept Mapping, Mind Mapping and Argument Mapping: What are the Differences and Do They Matter? Higher Education, (62(3)), 279-301. Financial Education for Youth. Trainer’s Manual (2011). Kathmandu: ILO Country Office for Nepal. Gudmunson, C.G., & Panes, S.M. (2011). Family Financial Socialization: Theory and Critical Review. Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 32(4), 644-667. Habschick, M., Seidl B., & Evers, J. (2007). Survey of Financial Literacy

Open access
Consumer Involvement in the Purchasing Process: Consciousness of the Choice

References Atkinson, L., & Rosenthal, S. (2014). Signaling the Green sell: the influence of eco-label source, argument specificity, and product involvement on consumer trust. Journal of Advert , (43), 33-45. [Accessed 20.03.2019]. Available from Internet: https://doi.org/10.1080/00913367.2013.834803 . Biswas, A., & Roy, M. (2015). Green products: an exploratory study on the consumer behaviour in emerging economies of the East. Journal of Cleaner Production , (87), 463–468. Cerri, J., Testa, F., & Rizzi, F. (2018). The more I care, the less I

Open access