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Prostitution, Essential and Incidental Aspects: A Libertarian Argument for Legalization

Abstract

Prostitution is often depicted as an aggressive and coercive activity. We have convincing empirical evidence that sometimes this is indeed the case. However, this is not sufficient to make it illegal. We argue that an activity should be outlawed if and only if it is essentially aggressive and/or coercive. But prostitution is not inherently violent, only incidentally. Indeed, prostitution could be defined as “the act of rendering, from the client’s point of view, non-reproductive sex against payment” (Edlund and Korn, 2002). No aggression and/or coercion necessarily enters this all-inclusive definition. This is why prostitution should be legalized laws to the contrary repealed.

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In Tourism Industry We Talk About Sustainable Development, But We Evaluate Profits and Growth

Abstract

Tourism is one of the biggest economic sectors, it has a significant impact on the environment. At the same time, the long-term development of tourism also greatly depends on the environment it affects. Experts are unanimous that it is necessary for the longterm existence and development of tourism that it becomes sustainable. Nevertheless, in tourism businesses, sustainable development strategies are not sufficiently present and put into practice. The author of the article presents the argument as a possible reason for this: the management of tourism enterprises as well as management of all the companies is focused on doing business successfully; and because the performance of management is assessed in terms of growth and security of its operations, and not in relation to the measures taken in the field of sustainable development, management gives priority to ensuring relatively short-term growth and security of operations.

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The Case for the Stateless Society: Law

Abstract

What is the argument against government? There are several. For one thing, there is automatic exit for failure: businesses that do not earn a profit go bankrupt, and their resources tend to migrate to other, more effective, managers. For another, entrepreneurs operate with their own funds, or those voluntarily entrusted to them. This does not apply to bureaucrats and politicians, in sharp contrast. Perhaps most important, in the case of each and every commercial interaction in the market, buying, selling, renting, lending, borrowing, there is mutual gain at least in the ex ante sense of anticipations, and usually ex post, after the trade, as well. This rarely occurs under statism, at least not with regard to its source of funds, taxation, since it is not voluntary. An exception would be the relatively unimportant cases in which a consumer purchases something from the government, such as a ticket to cross a bridge, or a producer sells something to this organization, such as an airplane. The present paper is an attempt to elaborate upon this considerations.

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Racial Discrepancies in the Participation Between Alcohol Prohibition and the Drug War

; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/LNS11300006 MOSCATELLO, RICK, MEGAN MCANDREWS* AND WALTER E. BLOCK (2015), “Satisfied with Poverty: An Argument for Ending Welfare”. Journal of Leadership and Management , Vol. 3, No. 5; http://leadership.net.pl/index.php/JLM/article/view/75 ; reprinted in Leadership and Management: Emerging, Contemporary, and Unorthodox Perspectives , Szpaderski, Adam and Christopher P. Neck, editors MURRAY, CHARLES (1984), Losing Ground: American Social Policy from 1950 to 1980 . New York: Basic Books MURRAY, CHARLES (2006

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