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Can thiol compounds be used as biomarkers of aquatic ecosystem contamination by cadmium?

Can thiol compounds be used as biomarkers of aquatic ecosystem contamination by cadmium?

Due to anthropogenic activities, heavy metals still represent a threat for various trophic levels. If aquatic animals are exposed to heavy metals we can obviously observe considerable toxicity. It is well known that an organism affected by cadmium (Cd) synthesize low molecular mass thiol compounds rich in cysteine (Cys), such as metallothioneins (MT) and glutathione (GSH/GSSG). The aim of this study was to summarize the effect of Cd on level of thiol compounds in aquatic organisms, and evaluate that the concentrations of thiol compounds are effective indicators of Cd water pollution and explain their potential use in biomonitoring applications.

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Analysis of Heavy Metals Concentration in Tissues of Three Different Fish Species Included in Human Diet from Danube River

, Gavinelli S, Pellegrino M, Scanzio T, Guarise S, Benedetto A, Abete MC: Heavy metals distribution in muscle, liver, kidney and gill of European catfi sh (Silurus glanis) from Italian Rivers. Chemosphere 2013, 90: 358-365. 10. Subotić S, Višnjić-Jeftić Ž, Spasić S, Hegediš A, Krpo-Ćetković J, Lenhardt M: Distribution and accumulation of elements (As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, and Zn) in tissues of fi sh species from different trophic levels in the Danube River at the confl uence with the Sava River (Serbia). Environ Sci Pollut Res 2013, 20: 5309

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Chlorinated compounds in the muscle tissue of fish from the Croatian Adriatic: preliminary data on contamination and the associated health risks / Klorirani spojevi u mišićnom tkivu riba iz istočnog Jadranskog mora: preliminarni podaci o zagađenosti i zdravstvenim rizicima

Levels of 17 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs) and seven organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were measured in the muscle tissue of 18 commercially important fish species from the eastern Adriatic Sea. PCBs [<LOD-8,866 ng g-1 lipid weight (lw)] accounted for over 66 % of all analysed compounds. Their pattern was dominated by PCB-138 and PCB-153. DDE (14.2-649 ng g-1 lw) was the prevalent DDT isomer in all samples, suggesting no recent DDT input. β-, γ- and α-HCH and HCB were found in less than 50 % of samples. The analysed organic contaminants did not seem to bioaccumulate up the food web (trophic levels 3.0 to 4.5). Our findings show no risk of chronic (non-cancerous) effects on human health

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Toxins produced in cyanobacterial water blooms - toxicity and risks

different trophic levels from the eutrophic Lake Chaohu, China. Environmental Toxicology   20 : 293-300. Yoshida T, Makita Y, Nagata S, Tsutsumi T, Yoshida F, Sekijima M, Tamura SI, and Ueno Y. (1997) Acute oral toxicity of microcystin-LR, a cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, in mice. Natural Toxins   5 : 91-95. Yu SZ. (1995) Primary Prevention of Hepatocellular-Carcinoma. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology   10 : 674-682. Zhou L, Yu H, and Chen K. (2002) Relationship between microcystin in

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Canned sea fish marketed in Serbia: their zinc, copper, and iron levels and contribution to the dietary intake

.2016.02.167 11. Subotić S, Spasić S, Višnjić-Jeftić Ž, Hegediš A, KrpoĆetković J, Mićković B, Skorić S, Lenhardt M. Heavy metal and trace element bioaccumulation in target tissues of four edible fish species from the Danube River (Serbia). Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 2013;98:196-202. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2013.08.020 12. Subotić S, Višnjić Jeftić Ž, Spasić S, Hegediš A, KrpoĆetković J, Lenhardt M. Distribution and accumulation of elements (As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, and Zn) in tissues of fish species from different trophic levels in the Danube

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Metal bioaccumulation in common carp and rudd from the Topolnitsa reservoir, Bulgaria

.04.023 37. Hansen BH, Garmo OA, Olsvik PA, Anderson RA. Gill metal binding and stress gene transcription in brown trout (Salmo trutta) exposed to metal environments: the effect of preexposure in natural populations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2007;26:944-53. doi: 10.1897/06-380R.1 38. Terra BF, Araújo FG, Calza CF, Lopes RT, Teixeira TP. Heavy metal in tissues of three fish species from different trophic levels in a tropical Brazilian River. Water Air Soil Pollut 2008;187:275-84. doi: 10.1007/s11270-007-9515-9 39. Moiseenko TI, Gashkina NA

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Human Exposure to Cyanotoxins and their Effects on Health

freshwater fish at different trophic levels from the eutrophic Lake Chaohu, China. Environ Toxicol 2005;20:293-300. 72. Romo S, Fernandez F, Ouahid Y, Baron-Sola A. Assessment of microcystins in lake water and fish (Mugilidae, Liza sp.) in the largest Spanish coastal lake. Environ Monit Assess 2012;184:939-49. doi: 10.1007/s10661-011-2011-0 73. Kozlowsky-Suzuki B, Wilson AE, Ferrao-Filho AS. Biomagnification or biodilution of microcystins in aquatic foodwebs? Meta-analyses of laboratory and field studies. Harmful Algae 2012;18:47-55. doi

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Assessing the role of soil microbial communities of natural forest ecosystem

Introduction A wide component of global biodiversity in the world is represented by microbial diversity from soils. A high variety of bacteria and fungi have soil as habitat and these active decomposers represent the base of trophic chains, sustaining by their activities the diversity of superior trophic levels. Soil is a rich source of microorganisms responsible for its most important functions in terrestrial ecosystems. Interaction between edaphic microorganisms and plants usually determines the biodiversity of vegetation ( 1 ). Previous research

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Determination of lotaustralin in Rhodiola species

(12):616-8. 17. Rojas MG, Morales-Ramo JA. Tri-trophic level impact of host plant linamarin and lotaustralin on Tetranychus urticae and its predator Phytoseiulus persimilis. J Chem Ecol 2010; 36:1354-1362. 18. Nyirenda DB, Chiwona-Karltun L, Chitundu M, Haggblade S, Brimer L. Chemical safety of cassava products in regions adopting cassava production and processing - Experience from Southern Africa, Food Chem Toxic 2011; 49:607-612. 19. Burns AE, Howard Bradbury J, Cavagnaro TR, Gleadow RM. Total cyanide content of cassava food products in

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Temporal dynamics of soil nematode community structure under invasive Ambrosia trifida and native Chenopodium serotinum

-1393(98)00123-1 [4] De Deyn, G. B., Raaijmakers, C. E., van Ruijven, J., Berendse, F., van der Putten, W. H. (2004): Plant species identity and diversity effects on different trophic levels of nematodes in the soil food web. Oikos, 106: 576–586 http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0030-1299.2004.13265.x [5] Ehrenfeld, J. E. (2003): Effects of exotic plant invasions on soil nutrient cycling processes. Ecosystems, 6: 503–523 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10021-002-0151-3 [6] Ferris, H., Bongers, T., de Goede, R. G. M. (2001): A framework for

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