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Influence of Chemically-Modified Potato Starch (RS Type 4) on the Nutritional and Physiological Indices of Rats

Influence of Chemically-Modified Potato Starch (RS Type 4) on the Nutritional and Physiological Indices of Rats

A biological study was undertaken to analyse the metabolic effect of feeding rats with an experimental diet in which cellulose was substituted with 20% contribution of chemically-modified potato starches (subjected to oxidation, esterification, cross-linking and dual modification). Caecum digesta mass was significantly higher in rats fed the experimental potato starch preparations compared to control group. Luminal ammonia concentration and pH of caecal or colonic content were lower as an effect of diets with all the investigated preparations. Compared to the cellulose-containing diet (control), all modified potato starch preparations raised the content of SCFA in caecum digesta when fed to rats. Significant lowering of the levels of triacylglycerols and total cholesterol was noticed for all chemically-modified starch preparations. The activity of β-glucuronidase determined upon the administration of potato starch preparations into rat diets was significantly lower as compared to the control diet. The results indicate that the chemically-modified potato starch preparations are a good substrate for the intestinal microecosystem and may promote the beneficial status of the gastrointestinal tract of rats.

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Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli, and Short Chain Fatty Acids of Vegetarians and Omnivores

, Nicoli JR, Neumann E, Nunes AC (2014): Lactobacillus species identification by amplified ribosomal 16s-23s rRNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Beneficial Microbes. 5, 471-481. doi: 10.3920/BM2013.0092 Schwiertz A, Lehmann U, Jacobasch G, Blaut M (2002): Influence of resistant starch on the SCFA production and cell counts of butyrate-producing Eubacterium spp. in the human intestine. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 93, 157-162. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2672.2002.01679.x. Scott KP, Gratz SW, Sheridan PO, Flint HJ, Duncan

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Fatty Acid Composition of Butter Originated from North-Eastern Region of Poland

fatty acids (in Polish). Prandini A., Sigolo S., Tansini G., Brogna N., Piva G., Different level of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in dairy products from Italy. J. Food Comp. Anal., 2007, 20, 472-479. Przybojewska B., Rafalski H., Fatty acids in milk vs. Human health. Saturated short-chain fatty acids SCFA. vol. 1, Przegl. Mlecz., 2003, 4, 148-151 (in Polish; English abstract). Stołyhwo A., Rutkowska J., Extrinsic fats in dairy products in view of Food Law of the EU (and domestic legislation

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Digestibility and nutrient retention of a wheat bran-containing diet containing two vegetable oil sources applied to laying hens with emphasis on prefeeding period

mucosa in the small intestine ( Jaroni et al., 1999 ). In the gut, dietary fiber is usually degraded to short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as butyrate, propionate, and acetate. Through the supplementation with WB containing dietary fiber, the production of SCFAs can be improved. These SCFAs provide energy for the colonocytes, modulate the immune system, further possess some anti-inflammatory potential, strenghten the intestinal barrier, and modulate oxidative stress reactions ( Hamer et al., 2008 ; Nyangale et al., 2012 ). Unfortunately, higher levels of WB in the

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Sustainable pig and poultry nutrition by improvement of nutrient utilisation – A review
Nachhaltige Schweine- und Geflügelernährung durch Steigerung der Nährstoffnutzungseffizienz – Eine Übersicht

main source of fermentable material in the large intestine ( Bach Knudsen and Hansen, 1991 ; Kreuzer et al., 1991 ). The most important products of microbial fermentation are SCFA, H 2 O, various gases (CO 2 , H 2 , CH 4 ) and bacterial protein ( Montagne et al., 2003 ). Between 95% and 99% of total SCFA produced in the GIT are absorbed before reaching the rectum ( Van Engelhardt et al., 1989 ; Montagne et al., 2003 ). These SCFA still contain considerable amounts of energy providing up to 15-24% of maintenance requirements for pigs ( Montagne et al., 2003 ). SCFA

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The Effect of Royal Jelly on Growth and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production of Probiotic Bacteria and Activity of Bacterial Procarcinogenic Enzymes in Rat Faeces

The present study was done to evaluate the effect of three different royal jelly samples on the kinetic growth of two isolates of lactic bacteria; Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum. The results showed that the addition of royal jelly supported and improved the growth of L. acidophilus and B. bifidum. The highest count of L. acidophilus was 9.01 (log10 cfu/mL) when 2% (w/v) of the royal jelly sample 3 was added to milk. The highest count of B. bifidum was 9.07 (log10 cfu/mL) when 5% (w/v) of the royal jelly sample 1 was added to milk. Based on the obtained results, royal jelly showed the capability of prebiotic activity and increasing the activity of L. acidophilus and B. bifidum. Royal jelly promotes SCFAs productions which are believed to have an antitumor effect. The results showed the presence of signifi cant synbiotic effect of fermented milk and royal jelly on the intestinal microflora. This effect is translated by the reduction in the faecal enzyme activities of β-glucuronidase, arylsulphatase, and β-gluconsidase which are involved in colon carcinogenesis.

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