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Romanian Bard: A Case Study of Shakespeare’s Adaptations in Contemporary Romania

References Boia, Lucian. History and Myth in Romanian Consciousness . Budapest & New York: Central European University Press. 2001. Print. Botezatu, Oana. “ Romeo şi Julieta - o păcăleală.” evz.ro 3 April 2008. Web. 10 April 2010. Bratu, Ion. “Ciuleandra - o strămoaşă îndepărtată a Drăgaicei.” Satul Natal No. 13/2004. Web. 3 May 2010. Cesereanu, Ruxandra. “Mahalaua România!” Revista Grupului pentru Dialog Social 25 February 2005. Web. 10 April 2011. Ciuleandra

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Contemporary Romanian Art in the United States

Notes: 1 A Romanian version of this article appeared in Sinteza, a Romanian culture and strategic thinking review , in January 2014.

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Creative Pluralism in Indian and Romanian Accounts of Transnational Migration

, Nelson. The View East, Central and Eastern Europe, Past and Present . “Inside Ceausescu’s Romania: An Unquestionably Efficient Police State” nd. Web.11 July 2016. Livezeanu, Irina. Making the History of 1989. “The Unique Experience of Romania”. University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Web.11 July 2016. Mitra, Sumit, Pais, J. Arthur. “Boston Brahmin.” India Today . 24 April 2000. Web. 9 June 2016. “Visul American. Aura Imbărus, profesor la Los Angeles.” Revista Unica . 5 September 2013. Web. 22 April 2016.

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American, British and Canadian Studies
The Journal of Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu
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A Romanian Jew in Hollywood: Edward G. Robinson

Abstract

The present study aims to investigate the contribution that actor Edward G. Robinson brought to the American film industry, beginning with his iconic role as gangster Little Caesar in Mervyn Le Roy’s 1931 production, and continuing with widely-acclaimed parts in classic film noirs such as Double Indemnity, The Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street. Edward G. Robinson was actually a Romanian Jew, born Emmanuel Goldenberg in Bucharest, in 1893, a relatively little known fact nowadays. By examining his biography, filmography and his best-known, most successful films (mentioned above), I show that Edward G. Robinson was one of classical Hollywood’s most influential actors; for instance, traits of his portrayal of Little Caesar (one of the very first American gangster films) can be found in almost all subsequent cinematic gangster figures, from Scarface to Vito Corleone. In the same vein, the doomed noir characters he played in Fritz Lang’s The Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street are still considered by film critics today to be some of the finest, most nuanced examples of noir heroes. Therefore, the main body of my article will be dedicated to a more detailed analysis of these films, while the introductory section will trace his biography and discuss some of his better-known films, such as Confessions of a Nazi Spy and Key Largo. The present study highlights Edward G. Robinson’s merits and impact on the cinema industry, proving that this diminutive Romanian Jew of humble origins was indeed something of a giant during Hollywood’s classical era.

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There’s a Double Tongue in Cheek: On the Un(Translatability) of Shakespeare’s Bawdy Puns into Romanian

Abstract

The translatability of William Shakespeare’s titillating puns has been a topic of recurrent debate in the field of translation studies, with some scholars arguing that they are untranslatable and others maintaining that such an endeavour implies a divorce from formal equivalence. Romanian translators have not troubled themselves with settling this dispute, focusing instead on recreating them as bawdily and punningly as possible in their first language. At least, this is the conclusion to which George Volceanov has come after analysing a sample of Shakespearean ribald puns and their Romanian equivalents. By drawing parallels between such instances of the Bard’s rhetoric and three of their Romanian translations, my article aims to reinforce the view according to which Romanian translators have succeeded, by and large, in translating Shakespeare’s bawdy puns into their mother tongue.

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What Is World Literature?

Works Cited ***. Dicţionarul cronologic al romanului românesc de la origini până la 1989 . Ed. Ion Istrate. Bucuresti: Editura Academiei Române, 2004. ***. Dicţionarul cronologic al romanului românesc (1990-2000) . Coordinator : Ion Istrate. Bucuresti: Editura Academiei Române, 2011. ***. Dicţionarul cronologic al romanului tradus în România 1990-2000. Cluj-Napoca: Editura Academiei Române, 2017. ***. Dicţionarul cronologic al romanului tradus în România de la origini până la 1989. Bucuresti: Editura Academiei Române, 2005

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Of “You” and “Thou,” Lips and Pilgrims in the Translation of Romeo and Juliet’s “Shared Sonnet”: A Hands-On Perspective

Abstract

It is not a recent discovery in the field of language history that the address pronouns thou and you were not, in Shakespeare’s time, used indiscriminately. If the speaker did have a choice between the two forms, that choice was by no means random, idiosyncratic or arbitrary, but always dictated by the social, relational or attitudinal context of a speech act. Nonetheless, all 20th-century Romanian translations of Romeo and Juliet (and of other Shakespearean plays) – from Haralamb Leca’s rather loose rendering (1907) to Ștefan-Octavian Iosif’s and to Virgil Teodorescu’s more refined versions (1940 and 1984, respectively) – seem to ignore the difference in associative meaning between the two forms, which is sometimes essential for a correct assessment of the relationships between characters. The latest Romanian translation of the play, which we have jointly submitted for publication within the Shakespeare for the Third Millennium project (William Shakespeare. Opere XIII, 2018) acknowledges the importance of the various associative meanings that the two pronouns carry and strives to restore these meanings to the text, though not without difficulty, given the rather restrictive form of the original, i.e. iambic pentameters, often with strict rhyme schemes. Thus, focusing on the well-known “shared sonnet” as one of the most relevant instances of pronoun alternation in the play, our paper discusses the uses of you and thou in Early Modern English and sets out to assess how much is lost in 20th-century translations, to show how our own translation restores the associative meanings of the two pronominal forms and finally to exemplify how we managed to overcome translation difficulties entailed by the metrical and stylistic demands of the text.

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A Portrait of the Writer as a Translator: Salman Rushdie and the Challenges of Post-colonial Translation

Location of Culture . London: Routledge, 1994. Crăciun, Dana. “Incursiuni în ‘Palimpstina’, traducerea literaturii postcoloniale în context românesc.” Cercetarea traductologică din România. Direcții, teme, perspective . Ed. Georgiana Lungu-Badea. Timișoara: EUV, 2017. 26-38. Eaglestone, Robert, and Martin McQuillan, eds. Salman Rushdie . London: Bloomsbury, 2013. Gandhi, Leela. Postcolonial Theory: A Critical Introduction . New York: Columbia UP, 1998. Jakobson, Roman. “On Linguistic Aspects of Translation.” Venuti, Lawrence (ed.). The

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The Loss of Grammatical Gender and Case Features Between Old and Early Middle English: Its Impact on Simple Demonstratives and Topic Shift

–232. Amsterdam & Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins. DOI: 10.1075/la.213.08eit Embick, David & Rolf Noyer. 2001. Movement operations after syntax. Linguistic Inquiry 32(4). 555–595. DOI: 10.1162/002438901753373005 Farkas, Donka F. & Henriëtte de Swart. 2007. Article choice in plural generics. Lingua 117(9). 1657–1676. DOI: 10.1016/j.lingua.2006.06.011 Farkas, Donka F. & Klaus von Heusinger. 2003. Stability of reference and object marking in Romanian. Paper presented at Workshop on direct Reference and Specificity (ESSLI), Vienna, August 2003. Fischer

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