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Impact of secondary landscape structure on the presence of non-native plant species in the cadastral area of the Topoľčany town

of selected GIS extensions for the analysis of secondary landscape structure of the Handlová town. In H. Svobodová (Ed.), Geography and geoinformatics: Challenge for practise and education . Proceedings of 19th International Conference (pp. 132–140). Brno: Masarykova univerzita. Oláhová, J., Vojtek, M. & Boltižiar M. (2013). Application of geoinformation technologies for the assessment of landscape structure using landscape-ecological indexes (case study of the Handlová landslide). Tájökológiai Lapok , 11(2), 351−366. Pauková, Ž. & Eliáš P. (2010

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Landscape Metrics as a Tool for Evaluation Landscape Structure – Case Study Hustopeče

.1016/j.ecolind.2006.08.001. [3] Hayriye, E., Bulent, D., Baris, K., et al. (2010). Analyzing landscape changes in the Bafa Lake Nature Park of Turkey using remote sensing and landscape structure metrics. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 165(1-4), 617-632. Doi: 10.1007/s10661-009-0973-y. [4] Fladmark, J., Mulvagh, G. & Evans, M. (1991). Tomorrow's Architectural heritage:Landscape and Buildings in the Countryside . Edinburgh and London:Mainstream Publishing. [5] Forman, R.T., Godron, M (1993). Krajinná ekologie

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Development of soil parameters and changing landscape structure in conditions of cold mountain climate (Case Study Liptovsk Á Teplička)

. Sarkar, B., Patra, A.K., Purakayastha, T.J. & Megharaj M. (2009). Assessment of biological and biochemical indicators in soil under transgenic Bt and non-Bt cotton crop in a sub-tropical environment. Environ. Monit Assess. , 156, 595−604. DOI: 10.1007/s10661-008-0508-y. Sinsabaugh, R.L., Findlay, S., Franchini, P. & Fischer D. (1997). Enzymatic analysis of riverine bacterioplankton production. Limnol. Oceanogr ., 48(1), 29-38. Solar, V. (2012). Changes of the city of Poprad from the point of view of landscape structure. In H. Svobodova

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Land-Use Change Related to Topography and Societal Drivers in High-Mountains – A Case Study in the Upper Watershed of the Tergi (Kazbegi Region), Greater Caucasus

–1978. DOI: 10.1002/joc.1276. [25] Hoechstetter, S., Walz, U., Dang, L. H. & Thinh, N. X. (2008). Effects of topography and surface roughness in analyses of landscape structure – a proposal to modify the existing set of landscape metrics. Landscape Online 3, 1–14. DOI: 10.3097/LO.200803. [26] Hüller, S., Heiny, J. & Leonhäuser, I.-U. (2017). Linking agricultural food production and rural tourism in the Kazbegi district – A qualitative study. Annals of Agrarian Sciences 15(1), 40–48. DOI: 10.1016/j.aasci.2017.02.004. [27] Kegel, H. (2003). The

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Land use changes and development of the non-forest woody vegetation in the Danubian Lowland in Slovakia

over the past 300 years. Journal of Geography Science, 25:1045–1057. Gemerský, V., 1961: Skúsenosti s ochrannými lesnými pásmi na Žitnom ostrove. Vedecké práce VÚLH v Banskej Štiavnici, No. 2, Bratislava, SAV, p. 153–228. Hernik, J. (ed.), 2009: Cultural landscape-across disciplines. Krakow, Branta, 365 p. Insley, H. (ed.), 1988. Farm Woodland Planning. London, Forestry Commission, Bulletin, 80, 142 p. Jurko, A., 1990: Ekologické a socioekonomické hodnotenie vegetácie. Bratislava, VEDA SAV, 200 p. Kuczman, G., 2014: Landscape structure

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Investigating the relationship between the prey composition of Barn Owls (Tyto alba) and the habitat structure of their hunting range in the Marcal Basin (Hungary), based on pellet analysis

, Budapest (in Hungarian with English Summary) Bond, G., Burnside, N., G., Metcalfe, D. J., Scott, D. M. & Blamire, J. 2004. The effects of land-use and landscape structure on Barn Owl (Tyto alba) breeding success in southern England, U.K. – Landscape Ecology 20: 555–566. DOI: 10.1007/s10980-004-5037-7 Cooke, D., Nagle, A., Smiddy, P., Fairley, J. & Muircheartaigh, I. 1996. The diet of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba) in County Cork in relation to land use. – Biology & Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 96B(2): 97–111. de la Peña, N. M, Butet

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Methods of Historical Landscape Structures Identification and Implementation into Landscape Studies

Landscape Structures in Context of Contemporary Reality (in Slovak). Životné prostredie, 38, 86-89. Jakubec, B. (2011). IInfluence of Land Use with Dispersed Settlements on Landscape´s Diversity and Biodiversity. PhD thesis, Technicka univerzita, Zvolen. Jančura, P., Bohalova, I., Slamova, M. & Mišikova P. (2010). Method of identification and assessment of characteristic landscape appearance. In Bulletin of the Ministry of Environment of Slovak Republic, Part 1b, 18, 2-51. Bratislava: MŽP SR. Kunz, M. (2010). Diversity of

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Landsliding as a Limit to Possible Territorial Development in the Kysuce Region

Abstract

The growing development of settlements in mountainous areas and their sustainable development constantly requires new approaches to assess the land in terms of occurrence of landslides. The flysch zone, where the monitored area is located, is one of the most landslide prone areas in Slovakia. Landslides respond sensitively to the quality of the individual factors that form the landscape and to the change of natural conditions. Their occurrence is a geo-barrier that reduces or totally prevents the use of natural environment and negatively affects the life of population and territorial development. The reason for the increased hazard of landslides is not only demographic pressure on territories, but also its poor management. Consistent spatial planning addresses not only the spatial layout but also the functional use of the territory. Landslides represent one of the limits of land use. This study is based on the assessment of landsliding as a limit to possible territorial development. The input parameters for the assessment were elements of the current landscape structure (built up structure, forest stands, transitional woodland-shrubs, traditional agricultural land, permanent grasslands and arable land) and occurring landslides (active, potential and stabilized). On most of the determined elements of the landscape, landslides occur on about a quarter of their area. They have a smaller share only in areas of mixed forests, built up areas and have the smallest share on arable land. Potential landslides have the largest proportion on all landscape elements. They occupy the largest areas on coniferous forests (1578.93 ha) and on permanent grasslands (741.33 ha). By evaluating the overall endangerment of the area by landslides according to the degree of threat, we found that the greatest threat of landslides is in the Skalité and Svrčinovec cadastral areas, the smallest threat is in the Čadca cadastral area. In addition to the danger of landsliding in the individual elements of the landscape, we have also set limits for its development. Spatial planning limits have been divided into two categories according to the sectors they affect the most: limiting the development of an area assigned for residential building, or restricting the development of an area designed for agricultural and forestry purposes.

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The influence of European Union single area payments and less favoured area payments on the Latvian landscape

0743-0167(01)00026-2 Latvian Environment Data Centre (2000). Biodiversity in Latvia http://enrin.grida.no/biodiv/biodiv/national/latvia/ecosys/agro/agrpres.htm Mander, Ü. & Palang, H. (1994). Changes of landscape structure in Estonia during the soviet period. GeoJournal 33(1): 44-54. Mazzoleni, D., Di Pasquale, G., Mulligan, M., Di Martino P. & Regio F. (2004). Recent Dynamics of the Mediterranean Vegetation and Landscape. London: J. Wiley and Sons

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The prey composition of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba) with respect to landscape structure of its hunting area (Zala County, Hungary)

Abstract

The prey composition of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba) can be monitored indirectly by pellet analysis and we used this method to investigate less known small mammal species of Zala County. The number and abundance of small mammal species depend on the structure of the landscape of Barn Owls’ hunting area, therefore we analysed landscape features in the surrounding circles with 2 km radius around the sampling sites. In 2016 we collected 1106 pellets from 13 sampling localities. From the pellets we identified 21 species of 3022 individuals of small mammals (more than 98% of prey). Among the 21 species there was the rare Parti-colured Bat (Vespertilio murinus) and a new species for the county the Steppe Mouse (Mus spicilegus). Positive correlation was found between the diversity of the small mammal fauna of each sampling site and the landscape complexity (number of the landscape patches) of the Barn Owl hunting area. Relative abundance of the Wood Mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) showed positive correlation with the number of landscape patches, while the abundance of the Lesser White-toothed Shrew (Crocidura suaveolens), the Miller’s Water Shrew (Neomys anomalus), the Striped Field Mouse (Apodemus agrarius) and the Harvest Mouse (Micromys minutus) was higher in hunting areas with more homogenous landscapes. Significant correlations were found between the relative abundance of some small mammal species and the landscape structure of the potential hunting area of owls that confirmed the consistency in habitat preference of some species. Our results proved that the prey-composition of Barn Owls reflects the land use through the distribution and abundance of small mammal species, therefore this method is suitable for ecological analyses of landscape.

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