Search Results

1 - 10 of 20 items :

  • "Integration" x
  • Plant Science x
Clear All
A geospatial approach to flash flood hazard mapping in the city of Warangal, Telangana, India

GIS. Journal of Hydrology, 504: 69–79. Tehrany M.S., Pradhan B., Jebur M.N., Neamah M. 2014. Flood susceptibility mapping using a novel ensemble weights-of-evidence and support vector machine models in GIS. Journal of Hydrology , 512: 332–343. Vahidnia M.H., Alesheikh A.A., Alimohammadi A., Hosseinali F. 2010. A GIS-based neurofuzzy procedure for integrating knowledge and data in landslide susceptibility mapping. Computers & Geosciences , 36, 9: 1101–1114. Van A.V.D., Logtmeijer C. 2005. Economic hotspots: visualizing vulnerability to flooding

Open access
Young urban trees as important structures in the cultural heritage of cities – a case study from Prague

. Veteran trees in landscape: a methodology for assessing landscape features with special reference to two ancient landscapes. [in:] R. Smithers (ed.) Landscape ecology of trees and forests , Proceeding of the twelfth annual IALE (UK) conference in Cirencester, UK, London: 168–175. Teoh S.H.S., Symes W.S., Sun H., Pienkowski T., Carraso L.R. 2018. A global meta-analysis of the economic values of provisioning and cultural ecosystem services. Science of the Total Environment , 649: 1293–1298. Tribot A.S., Deter J., Mouquet N. 2018. Integrating the aesthetic

Open access
Multi-benefits of national parks and protected areas: an integrative approach for developing countries

Abstract

National parks and protected areas can contribute significantly to the needs of poor people who live in and around them and depend heavily on forest resources for their subsistence. Especially for the rural poor who have limited economic options, use of national park resources are the main source for their survival, giving them direct benefits from food, medicine and forest products. National parks can contribute to maintaining the ecosystem and biodiversity conservation, along with the economic benefits to the local population. National parks and protected areas can play a significant role in climate change mitigation as well. Nevertheless, benefits from these areas are not well recognized in management especially in developing countries by incorporating them for climate change mitigation. Though usually more priority is given to conservation, improvement of livelihood and climate change mitigation can be achieved by integrating national parks into management and policy, and by consideration of the potential of human resources. Thus the integration can improve the poverty situation of local people and help them to adapt to climatic change mitigation strategies. Therefore, management of national parks and protected areas should ensure the participation of local communities and stakeholders.

Open access
In pursuit of livelihood sustainability and drought resilience: The human dimension of drought-adaptation in the Maasai pastoralists coupled socio-ecological systems across Kajiado County, Kenya

identity assessment of the climate change. International Journal of Global Warming , 5, 1: 30–45. UNDP. 2005. Adaptation Policy Frameworks for Climate Change . Developing Strategies, Policies and Measures, UNDP. UNEP-GoK. 2005. Environmental assessment of drought . United Nations Environmental Programme and the Government of Kenya, Nairobi. Wilhite D. A. (ed.). 2000. Drought: A global assessment . Routledge, London, New York. Zimmerer K.S., Bassett T.J. (eds.). 2003. Political ecology: an integrative approach to geography and environment

Open access
Development of indicators for the sustainability of the sugar industry

., Saint-Antonin V., Schweitzer J.M., Maréchal F., Ensinas A. 2018. Review of design works for the conversion of sugarcane to first and second-generation ethanol and electricity. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews , 91: 152–164. Brambila-Paz J.D.J., Martínez-Damián M.Á., Rojas-Rojas M.M., Perez-Cerecedo V. 2013. Real options, biorefineries and bioeconomy: the case of bioethanol and sugar. Agrociencia , 47, 3: 281–292. Brown D.G., Verburg P.H., Pontius R.G., Lange M.D. 2013. Opportunities to improve impact, integration, and evaluation of land change

Open access
Key processes shaping the current role and operation of higher education institutions in society

Abstract

The concurrent processes of globalisation, computerisation, and integration shape and constantly modify developmental factors and generate multidirectional social changes. Among social life fields, one of them has been particularly sensitive to the impact of those processes and has remained in clear feedback relationship with them is education, including university-level education. This article aims to present some reflections on the key processes which influence the environment of higher education institutions’ activity and on what their impact specifically is. The factors taken into account include: the transformation of the political and economic system, integration with the European higher education area, the market shift of education, evolving social demands towards higher education institutions and society’s attitude towards work. As knowledge has become an asset largely affecting the quality of life of people and society, universities have changed their focus from searching for and exploring truth, good and beauty in the world towards becoming innovation centres, transferring knowledge as offering their educational services. In this article, those trends have been exemplified in relation to geography degree programmes, and shown through an evolution of the model of the university. Based on a review of the literature, it seems that the processes discussed also concern geography degree programmes, and the future operation of these programmes closely depends on whether they can maintain their care for high quality education coupled with genuine efforts to ensure the smooth transition of graduates into the labour market.

Open access
Development of the urban space surrounding selected railway stations in Poland

Abstract

At present, many railway stations, in spite of being architecturally valuable, are subject to de-capitalization and degradation, which increasingly leads to demolition including elements or even entire railway stations of historical importance. Therefore, there arises a need to transform these facilities – as well as their nearby surroundings – into service areas not only for railway passengers but also for the consumer or tourist. This article presents an overview of the types of development of functional and spatial areas around a railway station, as well as the building itself, on selected examples in cities of Poland. In past historical periods, the surroundings of railway stations often became the new core of the studied centres, creating new urban structures. Train station forecourts, as well as access roads leading to railway stations, became specific links of railway infrastructure, the main points of which were railway stations, with the original urban layout. Unfortunately, the decline in the importance of rail transport has contributed to the recession and degradation of these spaces, and often to changes in their functions. This article refers to the concept of redevelopment of the railway station area, which emphasizes the creation of hubs integrating various modes of transport on the one hand, and transforming the area around the stations into an area of development of new business activities, on the other. Some of the discussed train stations have undergone a thorough renovation (e.g. Kraków Główny, Katowice and Poznań Główny), frequently in an attempt to allude to global trends in the commercialization of space and transport integration within station squares. However, this poses a problem and a challenge for decision-makers attempting to redevelop such facilities and the spaces associated with them.

Open access
An empirical examination of the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis for carbon dioxide emissions in Ghana: an ARDL approach

Abstract

The Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis postulates an inverted U-shaped relationship between different pollutants and economic growth. In Ghana, as in many other developing countries, there exist scanty studies that confirm or otherwise the EKC hypothesis with regards to CO2 emissions as well as the factors that drive CO2 emissions. This work aims to bridge this knowledge gap by addressing these two major questions using data from 1970 to 2010 and the Auto Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Bounds Testing approach. The results rather suggest a U-shaped relationship between per capita GDP and CO2 emissions per capita indicating the non-existence of the EKC hypothesis for CO2 in Ghana. This implies that further increase in per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) will only be associated with increase in CO2 emissions as the income per capita turning point of about $624 at constant 2000 prices occurred between 1996 and 1997. Furthermore, our results reveal energy consumption and trade openness are positive long run drivers of CO2 emissions. It is therefore recommended that the enhancement of trade liberalization policies should ensure the use of cleaner technologies and products while investment in cleaner energy alternatives could help reduce CO2 emissions. We also recommend the implementation of the Low Carbon Development Strategy which integrates development and climate change mitigation actions.

Open access
Community livelihood activities as key determinants for community based conservation of wetlands in Uganda

References Abrams R.W., Anwana E.D., Ormsby A., Dovie D.B.K., Ajagbe A., Abrams A. 2009. Integrating Top-Down with Bottom-Up Conservation Policy in Africa. Cons. Bio ., 23 (23): 779-804. Acrenaz M., Dabek L., O’Neil S. 2007. The Costs of Exclusion: Recognizing a Role for Local Communities in Biodiversity Conservation. PLoS Bio ., 11(5): 2443-2448. Akello C.E. 2007. Environmental Regulation in Uganda. Successes and Challenges. Law, Environ. Dev. J . Uganda. Andrade G.S.M., Rhodes J.R. 2012. Protected Areas and Local Communities: an

Open access
Contested minorities – the case of Upper Silesia

-442. Hoensch J.K. 1998. Geschichte Polens . Stuttgart. Jasińska-Kania A. (ed.) 2012. Wartości i zmiany. Przemiany postaw Polaków w jednoczącej się Europie . Warszawa. Kamusella T. 1999. The Dynamics of the Policies of Ethnic Cleansing in Silesia in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century. Budapest. Kamusella T. 2003a. The Szlonzoks and their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzakian Nationalism. EUI Working Paper HEC 3/2001. Kamusella T. 2003b. Dual citizenship in Opole Silesia in the context of European integration. Facta Univ

Open access