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Metonymy and frame integration: Interfacing between concepts and discourse

Abstract

This article inquiries into specific aspects of the relation between conceptual contiguity found in metonymic shifts and the online construction of frames, seen as a dynamic process of construal. It first reviews the theory of metonymy regarding the conceptual, lexical and contextual facets of the phenomenon. It then explores the possibility of extending the conceptual relevance of metonymy beyond the traditional typological approach of metonymic categorization, re-interpreting it as a frame-integration mechanism, or blending, whereby two frames are brought together into an extended ICM. Metonymic blending is formulated as a partial integration between two input spaces discursively driven, whereby an ad hoc identification of a referential commonness plays the role of the generic space of the blending. Subsequently, in the light of the assumption that frame-extension is not given categorically but it also includes – beyond its cognitive relevance – an interactional aspect, this analysis draws an interesting link: that between the generic space of metonymic blend, and common ground. The latter is precisely what facilitates the metonymic blend, regulating the distance between the integrated frames, at the same time remaining silent as discursively given information.

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Concepts in multimodal discourse analysis with examples from video conferencing

2(2). 155–169. Norris S. 2013a “What is a mode? Smell, olfactory perception, and the notion of mode in multimodal mediated theory” Multimodal Communication 2 2 155 169 Norris, S. 2013 b. “Multimodal (inter)action analysis: An integrative methodology”. In: Müller, C., E. Fricke, A. Cienki and D. McNeill (eds.), Body – language – communication . Berlin/New York: de Gruyter Mouton. Norris S. 2013 b “Multimodal (inter)action analysis: An integrative methodology” Müller C. Fricke E. Cienki A. McNeill D. Body

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The interrelationship between emotion, cognition, and bilingualism

-Rivera. 1994. “Current perspectives on using linguistic and cultural factors in counseling the Hispanic client”. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 25(4). 388-397. Ayçiçegi-Dinn, A. and C.L. Caldwell-Harris. 2009. “Emotion-memory effects in bilingual speakers: A levels-of-processing approach”. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 12(3). 291-303. Bloom, L. and R. Beckwith. 1989. “Talking with feeling: Integrating affective and linguistic expression in early language development”. Cognition & Emotion 3(4). 313

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Using complex networks to understand the mental lexicon

325. 412-413. Bond, Z.S. 1999. Slips of the ear: Errors in the perception of casual conversation. New York: Academic Press. Borgatti, S.P. 2006. “Identifying sets of key players in a network”. Computational, Mathematical and Organizational Theory 12. 21-34. Borsboom, D. and A.O.J. Cramer. 2013. “Network analysis: An integrative approach to the structure of psychopathology”. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology 9. 91-121. Brandes, U., G. Robins, A. McCranie and S. Wasserman. 2013. “Editorial: What is

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Challenges of annotation and analysis in computer-assisted language comparison: A case study on Burmish languages

-Mien language history. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics. Schwink, F. 1994. Linguistic typology, universality and the realism of reconstruction. Washington: Institute for the Study of Man. Smoot, M., K. Ono, J. Ruscheinski, P. Wang and T. Ideker. 2011. “Cytoscape 2.8. New features for data integration and network visualization”. Bioinformatics 27(3). 431-432. Steiner, L., P. Stadler and M. Cysouw. 2011. “A pipeline for computational historical linguistics”. Language Dynamics and Change 1(1). 89-127. Sturtevant, E

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Pre-closure laryngeal properties as cues to the fortis–lenis plosive contrast in British varieties of English

modelling of consonantal reduction”. In: Foulkes, P. and G. Docherty (eds.), Urban voices: Accent studies in the British Isles . London: Arnold. 163–184. Toscano, J.C. and B. McMurray. 2010. “Cue integration with categories: weighting acoustic cues in speech using unsupervised learning and distributional statistics”. Cognitive Science 34(3). 434–464. Turk, A. 1992. “The American English flapping rule and the effect of stress on stop consonant durations”. Ithaca Working Papers . New York: Cornell University Press. 103–134. < http

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Towards an integrated corpus stylistics

Abstract

Over recent years, the use of corpora in stylistic analysis has grown in popularity. However, questions still remain over the remit of corpus stylistics, its distinction from corpus linguistics generally and its capacity to explain complex stylistic effects. This article argues in favour of an integrated corpus stylistics; that is, an approach to corpus stylistics that integrates it with other stylistic methods and analytical frameworks. I suggest that this approach is needed for two main reasons: (i) it is analytically necessary in order to fully explain stylistic effects in texts, and (ii) integrating corpus methods with other stylistic tools is what will distinguish corpus stylistics from corpus linguistics. My argument is supported by reference to examples from Mark Haddon’s no vel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time and the HBO TV series Deadwood. Both these examples rely for their explanation on a combination of corpus stylistic analytical techniques and other stylistic methods of analysis.

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Conceptualization and representation of the passing of time in Spanish phraseology: A gender study

perspective. Cambridge: Polity. Coulson, S. and Pagán Cánovas, C., 2014. Understanding timelines: Conceptual metaphor and conceptual integration. Journal of Cognitive Semiotics , vol. 5, no. 1-2, pp. 198-219. Dobrovol’skij, D. and Piirainen, E., 2005a. Figurative language. Amsterdam: Elsevier. Dobrovol’skij, D. and Piirainen, E., 2005b: Cognitive theory of metaphor and idiom analysis. Jeziko-slovlje, vol. 6. no. 1, 7-35. Dobrovol’skij, D. and Piirainen, E., 2010. Idioms: Motivation and etymology. In: K. Kuiper, ed. Yearbook of phraseology 1

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Fractal metaphor LIFE IS A STORY in biographical narrative

Technology, vol. 2009. [Accessed September 2014] Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/670459 DANESI, M., 2008. Of cigarettes, high heels, and other interesting things: An introduction to semiotics. 2nd ed. London: Palgrave Macmillan. EFTEKHARI, A., 2006. Fractal geometry of texts: An initial application to the works of Shakespeare. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics, vol. 13, no. 2-3, pp. 177-193. FAUCONNIER, G. and TURNER, M., 1998. Conceptual integration networks. Cognitive Science. vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 133

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Narrative structures in Korean folktales: A comparative analysis of Korean and English versions

TESOL Annual Convention and the First Midwest TESOL Conference. Chicago. IL TESOL, pp. 123-132. CHAFE, W., 1982. Integration and involvement in speaking, writing and oral literature. In: D. Tannen, ed. Spoken and written language. Norwood, NJ: Ablex, pp. 35-54. CHATMAN, S., 1978. Story and discourse: Narrative structure in fiction and film. Ithaca, London: Cornell University Press. CONNOR, U., 1998. Contrastive rhetoric, New York: Cambridge University Press. DOLEZEL, L., 1978. Narrative modalities. In: T

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