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Lamprophyric rock locations in Greece

, lamprophyres, carbonatites and melilitic rocks. Recommendations and suggestions. Neues Jahrbuch fur Mineralogie Abhandlungen 134 , 1-14 Sutphin, D., Hammarstrom, J., Drew, L., Large, D., Berger, B., Dicken, C. & DeMarr, M. (2013). Fakos. U.S. Geological Survey, Mineral Resources Data System. Retrieved April 7, 2019 from U.S. Geological Survey database: https.//mrdata.usgs.gov/mrds/ . DOI: 10.3133/sir20105090K Tappe, S., Foley, S.F., Jenner, G.A., & Kjarsgaard, B.A. (2005). Integrating Ultramafic Lamprophyres into the IUGS Classification of Igneous Rocks

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Karst hydrogeology of Lamprechtsofen (Leoganger Steinberge, Salzburg)

Abstract

The Leoganger Steinberge are a heavily karstified massif largely composed of Dachstein dolomite and limestone hosting the deepest through-trip cave in the world, Lamprechtsofen, whose frontal parts are developed as a show cave. Many parts of this 60 km-long and 1724 m-deep system are hydrologically active. 1.5 km behind the lower cave entrance Grüntopf stream and Kneippklamm stream merge to form the main cave stream. Another underground stream, Stainerhallen stream, flows through the eponymous hall of the show cave. Since 2007 water temperature, electrical conductivity and water level have been monitored in the Grüntopf and Kneippklamm stream. Water temperature and water level in the Stainerhallen and main cave stream have been measured since 2016.

The long-term dataset (2013–2017) shows that the water temperature of the cave streams (Grüntopf stream: 3.7–5.2°C; Kneippklamm stream: 5.1–5.9°C) is largely invariant, but the electrical conductivity varies strongly (Grüntopf stream: 107–210 µS/cm; Kneippklamm stream: 131–248 µS/cm) in response to snowmelt and precipitation events. The event water of the Kneippklamm stream is characterized by a low electrical conductivity and is then followed by slightly warmer and higher mineralized water derived from the phreatic zone. This dual flow pattern also explains the asymmetrical changes of the water level during snowmelt: the fast event water flows directly through vadose pathways to the measurement site, whereas the hydraulic (phreatic) response is delayed. The Grüntopf stream reacts to precipitation and snowmelt events by changes in the karst-water table, which can be explained by a piston flow-model. The Kneippklamm stream reveals evidence of a lifter system.

The altitude of the catchments was calculated using δ18O values of water samples from the underground streams and from surface precipitation. The Grüntopf stream shows the highest mean catchment (2280 m a.s.l.), which is in agreement with its daily fluctuations of the water level until August caused by long-lasting snowmelt. The Stainerhallen stream has the lowest catchment (average 1400 m a.s.l.). The catchments of the other two streams are at intermediate elevations (1770–1920 m a.s.l.). The integration of the catchment analyses and observations from tracer tests conducted in the 1970s showed that the latter reflected only one aspect of the karst water regime in this massif. During times of high recharge the water level rises, new flow paths are activated and the karst watershed shifts.

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Cretaceous—Quaternary tectonic evolution of the Tatra Mts (Western Carpathians): constraints from structural, sedimentary, geomorphological, and fission track data

. & Stehlik O. (Eds.): Geomorphological problems of Carpathians. 1. Vyd. SAV, Bratislava, 9-53. Midriak R. 1983: Morphogenetic of the high-mountain surface. Veda, Bratislava, 516 (in Slovak). Minár J., Bielik M., Kováč M., Plašienka D., Barka I., Stankoviansky M. & Zeyen H. 2011: New morphostructural subdivision of the Western Carpathians: An approach integrating geodynamics into targeted morphometric analysis. Tectonophysics 502, 158-174. Nagy A., Vass D., Petrík R. & Pereszlényi M. 1996: Tectonogenesis of the Orava

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Life in the fluvial hinterland of the late Sarmatian Sea (middle Miocene): a rare terrestrial fossil site in the Styrian Basin (Austria)

Abstract

This paper describes the section and fossil content of a former gravel pit in the Eastern Styrian Basin (SE Austria), which exposes sediments of a fluvial system, ranging from within channel to overbank environments. A predominately terrestrial gastropod fauna of 15 species so far, was recovered from a palaeosol formed in a moist and vegetated, floodplain or abandoned channel. Up-section, a shallow freshwater pond/lake developed within the floodplain, settled by fishes, molluscs and ostracods. By integrating regional geological and biostratigraphical data derived from the terrestrial gastropod fauna as well as from the other recovered biota, these strata are of late middle Miocene (late Sarmatian s.str.) age. Hence, this fossil site provides a rare insight into the terrestrial habitats in the hinterland of the Sarmatian Sea and their biota, which are otherwise barely known in Central Europe.

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Quaternary evolution of the Southern Apennines coastal plains: a review

Abstract

The Quaternary evolution of the main coastal basins located along the southwestern margin of the Southern Apennines has been reconstructed by integrating the huge amount of existing stratigraphical and geomorphological data. The information produced in the last twenty years has shed new light on the recent (late Middle Pleistocene to Present) history of the Campanian and Sele plains or basins. During the early Quaternary, the analysed coastal basins originated as half-grabens in response to opening processes active since the late Tortonian in the southern Tyrrhenian back-arc basin. In some of these basins (e.g. the Campanian Plain), volcanism has also played an important role. In the inner sectors of the coastal basins, the complex interplay between block faulting, sedimentary inputs and glacioeustatic fluctuations gave rise to relative sea-level change and related coastline migrations, leading to the formation of the present-day coastal plains. In the Sele Plain basin, the construction of the present-day landscape mainly resulted from the substantial ceasing of subsidence in the final part of the Middle Pleistocene. Conversely, a strong contribution to the recent evolution of the Campanian Plain has been provided by abundant volcaniclastic aggradation, able to hinder the effect of the vertical motions that occurred in the last 100 ka.

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Thermal history of the Maramureş area (Northern Romania) constrained by zircon fission track analysis: Cretaceous metamorphism and Late Cretaceous to Paleocene exhumation

Abstract

This study presents zircon fission track data from the Bucovinian nappe stack (northern part of the Inner Eastern Carpathians, Rodna Mountains) and a neighbouring part of the Biharia nappe system (Preluca massif) in order to unravel the thermal history of the area and its structural evolution by integrating the fission track data with published data on the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the area. The increase of metamorphic temperatures towards the SW detected by the zircon fission track data suggests SW-wards increasing tectonic overburden (up to at least 15 km) and hence top NE thrusting. Sub-greenschist facies conditions during the Alpine metamorphic overprint only caused partial annealing of fission tracks in zircon in the external main chain of the Central Eastern Carpathians. Full annealing of zircon points to at least 300 °C in the more internal elements (Rodna Mountains and Preluca massif). The zircon fission track central and single grain ages largely reflect Late Cretaceous cooling and exhumation. A combination of fission track data and stratigraphic constraints points to predominantly tectonic differential exhumation by some 7-11 km, connected to massive Late Cretaceous extension not yet detected in the area. Later events such as the latest Cretaceous (“Laramian”) juxtaposition of the nappe pile with the internal Moldavides, causing exhumation by erosion, re-burial by sedimentation and tectonic loading during the Cenozoic had no impact on the zircon fission track data; unfortunately it prevented a study of the low temperature part of the Late Cretaceous exhumation history.

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Clay minerals from Weichselian glaciolimnic sediments of the Sępopolska Plain (NE Poland)

-304. Srodon J. 1984: X-ray powder identification of illitic materials. Clays and Clay Miner. 32, 337-349. Stankowska A. 1980: Stratigraphic and regional variation of glacial tills in Poland in the light of clay minerals investigations. In: Stankowski W. (Ed.): Tills and glacigene deposits. Zesz. Nauk. UAM, Poznan 20, 57-65. Vincente M.A., Razzaghe M. & Robert M. 1977: Formation of aluminum hydroxy vermiculite (integrate) and smectite from mica under acidic conditions. Clay Miner. 12, 101-112.

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Selective mineral composition, functional test morphology and paleoecology of the agglutinated foraminiferal genus Colominella Popescu, 1998 in the Mediterranean Pliocene (Liguria, Italy)

Central Paratethys. Abh. Senckenberg. Naturforsch. Gesell. 549, 69-325. Por F.D. 2010: Climate optimum rejuvenates the Mediterranean marine world. Integrative Zoology 5, 112-121. Schmiedl G., de Bovée F., Buscail R., Charriere B., Hemleben C., Medernach L. & Picon P. 2000: Trophic control of benthic fora-miniferal abundance and microhabitat in the bathyal Gulf of Lyons, western Mediterranean Sea. Mar. Micropaleont. 40, 167-188. Solsona M. 1999: Systematics and description of the Families Ton-nidae, Ficidae and

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Correlation between geology and concentration-volume fractal models: significance for Cu and Mo mineralized zones separation in the Kahang porphyry deposit (Central Iran)

the circum- Pacific region. Australian J. Earth Sci . 44, 373-388. Sim B.L., Agterberg F.P. & Beaudry C. 1999: Determining the cut off between background and relative base metal contamination levels using multifractal methods. Computers and Geosciences 25, 1023-1041. Spalla M.I., Morotta A.M. & Gosso G. 2010: Advances in interpretation of geological processes: refinement of multi-scale data and integration in numerical modelling. Geol. Soc. London , 1-240. Stocklin J.O. 1977: Structural correlation of the Alpine

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Geochronology and petrogenesis of granitoid rocks from the Goryczkowa Unit, Tatra Mountains (Central Western Carpathians)

. Berkeley Geochronology Center, Spec. Publ., No. 4. Morozewicz K. 1914: Über die Tatragranite. Neu. Jb. Miner. Geol. Paläont. 39, 289-345. Patiño Douce A. E. 1999: What do experiments tell us about the relative contributions of crust and mantle to the origin of granitic magmas? In: Castro A., Fernandez C. & Vigneresse J.L. (Eds.): Understanding granites: Integrating new and classical techniques. Geol. Soc. London, Spec. Publ. 168, 55-75. Pearce J.A., Harris N.B.W. & Tindle A.G. 1984: Trace elements discrimination diagram for

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