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Characteristics of the butterflies on various forms of land uses

(L.) II - VI II II 16 V. cardui (L.) - I - - - 17 Aglais urticae (L.) I I - I I 18 Araschnia levana (L.) I - - I - 19 Polygonia c-album L I - - - - 20 Argynnis paphia (L.) - I - I 21 A. aglaja (L.) II - - III III 22 Issoria lathonia (L.) - - - IV - 23 Boloria. selene (Den. & Schiff) I - I - II 24 Melanargia galathea (L.) - - I - IV 25 Maniola jurtina (L.) V I II IV V 26

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Evaluation of long term forest fires in India with respect to state administrative boundary, forest category of LULC and future climate change scenario: A Geospatial Perspective

References Ager A.A., Evers C.R., Day M.A., Preisler H.K., Barros A.M.G., Nielsen-Pincus M. 2017. Network analysis of wildfire transmission and implications for risk governance. PLoS ONE 12(3): e0172867. DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0172867. Ahmad F., Goparaju L. 2017a. Geospatial Assessment of Forest Fires in Jharkhand (India). Indian Journal of Science and Technology 10(21): 7. DOI 10.17485/ijst/2017/v10i21/113215. Ahmad F., Goparaju L. 2017b. Assessment of Threats to Forest Ecosystems Using Geospatial Technology in Jharkhand State of India

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Long term changes in water areas and wetlands in an intensively farmed landscape: A case study from the Czech Republic

. & Netopil, P. (2014). Historické rybníky České republiky. Srovnání současnosti se stavem v 2. polovině 19. století. Praha: Výzkumný ústav vodohospodářský T. G. Masaryka, v.v.i. [21] Petrovszki, J. & Mészáros, J. (2010). The Great Hunagarian plain in the sheets of the Habsburg military surveys and some historical maps - a case study of the Körös/Criș drainage basin. Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica Hungarica 45(1), 56-63. DOI: 10.1556/AGeod.45.2010.1.9. [22] Sádlo, J. & Karlík, P. (2002). Landscape-ecological interpretation of old maps through

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The Influence of Spinosad and Azadirachtin on Beneficial Fauna Naturally Occurring on Cabbage Crops

The Influence of Spinosad and Azadirachtin on Beneficial Fauna Naturally Occurring on Cabbage Crops

The influence of spinosad (SpinTor 480 SC) and azadirachtin (Neem Azal T/S) on beneficial fauna naturally occurring on cabbage crops was evaluated in field experiments conducted in years 2004-2006. The insecticides were applied as a plant spray in field recommended dosages i.e. 96 g of active ingredient (a.i.) per ha for spinosad and 24 ml a.i. per ha for azadirachtin. The effect of direct contact of larva or adult of Coccinellidae ssp., Syrphidae spp. and Chrysopidae ssp. and the percentage of cabbage aphid parasited by Diaeretiella rapae M'Intosh with residues on leaves were observed on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st day after treatment. The results obtained in conducted experiments indicated that there was no influence of two tested insecticides on the reduction of above mentioned groups of predators and parasite. The number of beneficial fauna occurring on treated cabbage plants was similar to those present on control plots.

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Effect of Storage Duration and Temperature on Sets Loss and Bolting of Onion

Effect of Storage Duration and Temperature on Sets Loss and Bolting of Onion

Onion sets of two cultivars - Rawska and Jetset F1 were calibrated into three grades depending on the diameter of onion (11-15, 16-20 and 21-25 mm). From October to March, sets were kept in the following conditions: I - 24 weeks at 0-1°C, II - 15 weeks at 0-1°C, then 9 weeks at 18-20°C, III - 11 weeks at 0-1°C, then 13 weeks at 18-20°C, IV - 24 weeks at 18-20°C. The storage loss caused by complete drying up, sprouting into leaves and occurrence of disease symptoms were determined. The sets left over after evaluation of storage loss were planted in the field in order to determine bolting of onion. Cold storage (0-1°C) for 24 weeks reduced loss but stimulated bolting. In the case of Jetset F1, warm storage (18-20°C) for the last 9 weeks of the 24 weeks' experimental storage period practically eliminated bolting. The sets of Rawska required longer exposures of 18-20°C at the end of storage for suppressing of inflorescence development than Jetset F1. The smaller onion sets were kept the shorter the duration of warm storage required to reduce bolting. The longer onion sets were stored at 18-20°C the greater storage loss were noted.

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The Influence of Grafting and Biostimulators on the Yield and Fruit Quality of Greenhouse Tomato CV. (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Grown in the Field

The Influence of Grafting and Biostimulators on the Yield and Fruit Quality of Greenhouse Tomato CV. (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Grown in the Field

Four tomato cultivars Macarena F1, Faustine F1, Cathy F1 and Fanny F1 were used in the study. Seeds were sown at the end of March and transplants were grown in a greenhouse. The plants were grafted on Maxifort F1 rootstock on April 5, 6 and 21 in the years 2006, 2007, 2008 respectively without the use of biostimulators. In the case of the other combinations each year the following treatments with biostimulators were performed: watering with Goteo 0.1% solution (twice - 4 and 2 weeks before planting and three times after planting at three-week intervals), spraying with BM 86 0.1% solution (four times every three weeks starting at the blooming of first cluster). In the control combination plants were neither-nor grafted or treated with biostimulators. Plants were planted in the field at 70×100 cm spacing - 20 plants per plot. For the ripe fruits analyses the following parameters were determined: dry matter, total sugars, vitamin C, carotenoids and macroelements: N, P, K, Ca.

A higher total and marketable yield was obtained after grafting and Goteo treatments. There was a significant influence of grafting and the application of the biostimulators on the content of dry matter and total sugars, however, the highest content of vitamin C and carotenoids were obtained in the control. There was a slight increase of the content of nitrates and calcium in the fruit in the case of grafting and Goteo biostimulator watering treatments, whereas the highest content of potassium in the fruit was obtained in plants treated with BM 86 and phosphorus in the fruits from control combination plants.

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Jatropha seed cake and organic waste compost: the potential for improvement of soil fertility

;11(2):179-184. http://www.pjoes.com/index.php?s=abs_id&id=2002110211 . [4] Wolińska A, Stępniewska Z, Szafranek-Nakonieczna A. Effect of selected physical parameters on respiration activities in common Polish mineral soil. Pol J Environ Stud. 2011;20(4):1075-1082. http://www.pjoes.com/index.php?s=abs_id&id=2011200433 . [5] Martyn W, Skwaryło-Bednarz B. Biological properties of light soils in the area of Roztocze National Park. Acta Agrophys. 2005;5(3):695-704. http://www.old.acta-agrophysica.org/en/semi_year_book.html?stan=detail&paper=508&i=21&vol=5&numer=3

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Forest Fire Trend and Influence of Climate Variability in India: A Geospatial Analysis at National and Local Scale

References Aggarwal, A., Paul, V. & Das S. (2009). Forest resources: Degradation, livelihoods, and climate change. In D. Datt & S. Nischal (Eds.), Looking back to change track (pp. 91−108). New Delhi: TERI. Ahmad, F. & Goparaju L. (2017). Geospatial assessment of forest fires in Jharkhand (India). Indian Journal of Science and Technology , 10(21), 1−7. DOI: 10.17485/ijst/2017/v10i21/113215. Ahmad, F., Goparaju, L., Qayum, A. & Quli S.M.S. (2017). Forest fire trend analysis and effect of environmental parameters: A study in Jharkhand State of

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