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Decorative Borders in Chinese Folk Prints. Insight into the Náprstek Museum Collections

Literature EBERHARD, W. A Dictionary of Chinese Symbols . New York, 1986. FENG, Jicai 瑪駿才 (ed.). Zhongguo muban nianhua jicheng, Riben cangpin juan 中國木版年畫集成日本藏品卷.. Beijing, 2011. HEROLDOVÁ, Helena. Mezi kulturami. Oděvni vyšivka v pozdnim obdobi dynastie Čching. Praha, 2015. MIYAMA, Ryó. A Brilliant World of Chinese New Year Pictures. Tokyo, 2013. LIU, Linxian 劉林仙.. Yingxiong da ba y i 英雄大八義.. Taiyuan, 1987. Qingdai baokan tushu jicheng 清代報刊圖書集成.. Taibei, 2001. TAKIMOTO, Hiroyuki 瀧本弘之. Shilun “chuqi Gusu ban” de

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Spectacles and Embroidered Spectacle Cases from China in the Náprstek Museum

Literature Agarwal, Rishi Kumar 1971 “Origin of spectacles in India.“ British Journal of Ophthalmology , Vol. 55, No. 2, pp. 128–129. Bertolucci, Bernardo, director 1987 The Last Emperor . Hemdale Film Corporation. Bock, Emil 1903 Die Brille and ihre Geschichte . Wien: Josef Šafář. Chen, Kaijun 2018 “Transcultural Lenses: Wrapping the Foreignness for Sale in the History of Lenses .“ In Grasskamp, Anna and Monica Juneja, eds. China, Europe, and the Transcultural Object, 1600-1800 . Springer, pp. 77–98. Chiu, Kaiming 1936

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Regional exchange, long-distance trade, and local imitations: Liuwan cemetery in the context of the cultural transformation from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age (cca 2000 BC) in the Chinese Northwest

Abstract

It is widely acknowledged that in the Qijia Culture Period (cca 2200–1500 BC), the Chinese Northwest participated in a broader network of contacts spanning from the Middle Yellow River Valley to Central Asia. However, opinions differ considerably as one regards the character of those contacts and their role in the genesis of the culture. On one hand, many Chinese scholars view the emergence of the Qijia Culture as a result of large migrations from the East; on the other, some western scholars suggest that a number of western human groups participated in its formation. In the present article we use the model of non-uniform institutional the complexity to explain the emergence of the Qijia Culture. We first point out its continuity with earlier Late Neolithic local cultures, and then focus on the spread of new artefacts and, as evidence suggests, of institutions from the East which led to the transformation of various aspects of the material culture within the broader region of the Chinese Northwest, while other elements – burial rites, for instance – preserved their regional diversity. We suggest that eastern innovations spread partly through channels established earlier within an exchange network of locally produced painted pottery and also in association with local area’s social development. These suggestions are supported by the case study which considers the process of development at the well-known site of Liuwan in the middle reaches of the Huang River Valley, Qinghai Province.

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Traditions and Innovations in the Clothing of Southern Altaians

Abstract

The study deals with the traditional clothing of the Southern Altaians – Altai-Kizhi and Telengits, living in the territory of the Altai Republic in the Russian Federation, its common features, ethnic specifics and, above all, the changes it has gone through since the second half of the 18th century to the present. During this period, there were several major political developments that had a significant impact on traditional Altai culture, including clothing. Attention is focused on the influence of Russian and Chinese textile production, the transformation of the material used in the production of clothing, its forms, decorative elements, colour as well as its role and use at present.

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The Dragon Robe as the Professional Dress of the Qing Dynasty Scholar-Official (The Náprstek Museum Collection)

Literature: BARTHOLOMEW Tse, Terese. Hidden Meanings in Chinese Art. Asian Art Museum, 2012. BERTIN-GUEST, Josiane. Chinese Embroidery. Traditional Techniques. Krause publications, 2003. CAMMANN, Schuyler. Notes on the Origin of Chinese K’o-ssŭ Tapestry. Artibus Asiae, 11/1, 2 (1948): 90-110. CAMMANN, Schuyler. A Robe of the Ch’ien-Lung Emperor. The Journal of the Walters Art Gallery 10 (1947): 8-19. DEUSEN, Kira van. The Flying Tiger. Women Shamans and Storytellers of the Amur. Ithaca: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2001

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Imperial Dragon in the Roaring Twenties: Qing Dynasty Dress Re-Made

Literature: BOLTON, Andrew at al . China Through the Looking Glass . New York, 2015. CAMMANN, Schuyler. A Robe of the Ch’ien-Lung Emperor. The Journal of the Walters Art Gallery 10, 1947, pp. 8–19. DICKINSON, Gary – WRIGGLESWORTH, Linda. Imperial Wardrobe . Berkeley, 2000. FUKAI, Akiko. Fashion from the 18 th to the 20 th Century . Taschen, 2004. GARRETT, Valery M. Chinese Dragon Robes . Oxford University Press, 1999. GARRETT, Valery M. Chinese Dress. From the Qing Dynasty to the Present . Tuttle Publishing, 2007

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Common names for Cricetus cricetus (Rodentia: Cricetidae)

Kupfertafeln . Siegfried Lebrecht Crusius, Leipzig, xxxviii+560+40 pp., 10 plts. L unde D. & S mith A., 2008: Family Cricetidae. Pp.: 214–247. In: S mith A. T. & X ie Y. (eds.): A Guide to the Mammals of China . Princeton University Press, Princeton, 544 pp. M arinković V., 1851: Estetstvena povestnica za mladež srbsku . Pri pravitelstvenoj knigopečatni srbskog, Beograd (in Serbian). M arkov G., 1959: Bozajnicite v Bălgariâ [ Mammals in Bulgaria ]. Nauka i izkustvo, Sofiâ, 155 pp (in Bulgarian). M eyer M., 2009: Feldhamster Cricetus

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Bats in the Florentine Renaissance: from darkness to enlightenment (Chiroptera)

Abstract

We highlight the use of the bat (Chiroptera) in the Florentine Renaissance art. Michelangelo Buonarroti, Bernardo Buontalenti, Albrecht Dürer and several others used images of bats in their sketches, sculptures and decorations and many bat images are still to be seen on the palaces and monuments in the Historic Centre of Florence, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The bats can usually be identified as such by the large ears or the characteristic wing membranes, although they constitute highly stylized artwork, often grotesque and certainly not intended to be morphologically correct. Furthermore, during the Renaissance it was not yet realized that bats are mammals, and some of the images could actually be interpreted as either birds or bats. The bat image was somehow tied to the Medici Noble Family, the undisputed rulers of Florence throughout the Renaissance, where it may have symbolized cultural darkness or ignorance. We speculate that the bat images could also have meant happiness and prosperity, with connections to China, and protected the buildings on which they appeared. In any case, the Renaissance bat had evolved far, artistically as well as conceptually, from the bat images that personified demons or the Devil in the European medieval literature and contemporary religious artwork.

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Biomonitoring of persistent organic pollutants in Egypt using Taphozous perforatus (Chiroptera: Emballonuridae)

intensification. Journal of Applied Ecology , 40 : 984–993. Y ang X., W ang S., B ian Y., C hen F., Y u G., G u C. & J iang X., 2008: Dicofol application resulted in high DDTs residue in cotton fields from northern Jiangsu province, China. Journal of Hazardous Materials , 150 : 92–98. Z ukal J., P ikula J. & B andouchová H., 2015: Bats as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution: history and prospect. Mammalian Biology , 80 : 220–227.

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