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What Drives Politicians to Run for Office: Money, Fame or Public Service?

–215. Besley, Timothy. 2005. “Political Selection.” The Journal of Economic Perspectives 19, 43–60. Besley, Timothy. 2006. “Principled Agents? The Political Economy of Good Government.” The Lindahl Lectures. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Besley, Timothy. 2007. “The New Political Economy.” The Economic Journal 117(524), 570–587. Besley, Timothy and Maitreesh Ghatak. 2005. “Competition and Incentives with Motivated Agents.” American Economic Review 95, 616–636. Black, G. S. 1972. “A Theory of Political Ambition: Career Choices and the

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Computer-Based Simulation Games in Public Administration Education

Abstract

Computer simulation, an active learning technique, is now one of the advanced pedagogical technologies. Th e use of simulation games in the educational process allows students to gain a firsthand understanding of the processes of real life. Public- administration, public-policy and political-science courses increasingly adopt simulation games in universities worldwide. Besides person-to-person simulation games, there are computer-based simulations in public-administration education. Currently in Russia the use of computer-based simulation games in Master of Public Administration (MPA) curricula is quite limited. Th is paper focuses on computer- based simulation games for students of MPA programmes. Our aim was to analyze outcomes of implementing such games in MPA curricula. We have done so by (1) developing three computer-based simulation games about allocating public finances, (2) testing the games in the learning process, and (3) conducting a posttest examination to evaluate the effect of simulation games on students’ knowledge of municipal finances. Th is study was conducted in the National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE) and in the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA) during the period of September to December 2015, in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Two groups of students were randomly selected in each university and then randomly allocated either to the experimental or the control group. In control groups (n=12 in HSE, n=13 in RANEPA) students had traditional lectures. In experimental groups (n=12 in HSE, n=13 in RANEPA) students played three simulation games apart from traditional lectures. Th is exploratory research shows that the use of computer-based simulation games in MPA curricula can improve students’ outcomes by 38 %. In general, the experimental groups had better performances on the post-test examination (Figure 2). Students in the HSE experimental group had 27.5 % better scores than students in the HSE control group. Students of the RANEPA experimental group had 38.0 % better scores than students in the RANEPA control group. Research indicates that lecture-based courses are less effective than courses with more interactive approaches. Therefore, our study highlights the need to implement computer-based simulation games in MPA programmes in Russian universities. Computer-based simulation games provide students with practical skills for their future careers.

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Access to Socio-Cultural Life inside Assisted Care Homes?
Overviewing Legislation in Finland and Kazakhstan

Abstract

This is a comparative survey of two national legal frameworks in Finland and Kazakhstan providing the elderly in assisted care homes with an opportunity of socio-cultural inclusion. The study departs from the evolving international standards of ageing, which dictate legal obligations to provide the elderly in residential care with access to socio-cultural activities. Our analysis continues with explorations how these standards are reflected in legislation of two selected states. We deliberately selected these two jurisdictions, different in many respects, the most significant of which are the current state of the welfare system and the approach towards elderly care. The residential care in Finland is the primary responsibility of the state, a common modern solution adapted to meet the realities of the modern volatile labor market, career and self-oriented life style and hectic differentiating global economy. In Kazakhstan such care is provided by the state only for those older persons who are in difficult life situation, whereas the able relatives are legally responsible for providing care for the elderly in need of 24 / 7 assistance. Respectively Kazakhstan’s social order relies extensively on family ties.

Our analysis covers the status of the elderly residing both in 24 / 7 institutional care and in the so-called serviced apartments where the elderly are not in constant care. Rather than drawing on the generalized status of dependency we keep up with the premise that the elderly are special-rights holders. This limitation leaves studying the position of other individuals under public custody out of the present research agenda. Relying extensively on legal analysis, we employ, in particular, a comparative law method and empirical studies, i.e. the interviews with the aged rights holders.

After we examined how the opportunities for socio-cultural inclusion of the elderly are implemented in two selected jurisdictions with principally different welfare systems, we found that the problem in question is topical for each of the states under consideration. In light of the evolving international law standards institutional practices in both jurisdictions must be sensitive to the issue of socio-cultural inclusion. The socio-cultural dimension of the wellbeing of the elderly, especially with respect to those who are in 24 / 7 care, should be incorporated in the legal system of Kazakhstan just as it exists in the statutory law of Finland.

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Pay Dissatisfaction among Municipal Employees: Empirical Evidence from Russia’s Stavropol Region

References Atnashev, T. 2017. “Self-Sacrificing Bureaucrats ? High Motivation Factors of Civil Servants in Russia.” Public Administration Issues 11(3), 149 – 166. Bertelli, A. M. 2007. “Determinants of Bureaucratic Turnover Intention: Evidence from the Department of the Treasury.” Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 17(2), 235 – 258. doi:10.1093/jopart/mul003. Braunstein, D. N. and G. H. Haines. 1968. “Preference Scaling of Careers and Organizations.” Journal of Applied Psychology 52(5), 380 – 385. Brewer, M. B. and

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Responding to Challenge: Comparing Nonprofit Programmes and Pedagogy at Universities in the United Kingdom, Spain and the United States

. Herman, Robert D. and David O. Renz. 2007. “Nonprofit Management Alumni Knowledge, Skills, and Career Satisfaction in Relation to Nonprofit Academic Centers Council Curricular Guidelines: Th e Case of One University’s Master’s of Public Administration Alumni.” Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 36, 98S-109S. Higher Education Statistics Agency. 2013. “Table 0” - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study and domicile 2008 / 09. Available at hesa.ac.uk/ (last accessed 2 Oct. 2013). Howorth, Carole, Susan Smith and

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Administration
Journal of the Institute of Public Administration of Ireland
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A JobBridge to nowhere: The National Internship Scheme as fast policy leading to bad policy

Abstract

JobBridge, the Irish National Internship Scheme, was a labour activation measure launched in July 2011, during a period of extreme economic crisis, and was marketed as a chance for young people to gain career experience in quality work placements. Over 60 per cent of participants found employment after leaving the scheme but it suffered from high deadweight losses and was widely criticised as exploitative during its existence. This was quite predictable, which leaves the puzzle as to why JobBridge was designed without more regulations to protect the entry-level jobs market and the interests of the unemployed? This paper will trace the processes behind this suboptimal decision-making. First, it will show the institutional factors influencing poor policy decisions on labour activation. Then it will explain the main incentives behind an under-regulated programme, which were the need to develop a workable scheme as quickly as possible and to do this without significant funding. Finally, it will show how the decision-making process prioritised the interests of the Labour Party, government, business and the concerned parents of unemployed youth over the interests of the unemployed.

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The 1916 Rising and the revolutionary origins of the Irish Department of Finance

Central Bank . Dublin: Institute of Public Administration. O’Broin, L. (1986). Just like yesterday – An autobiography . Dublin: Gill & Macmillan. O’Donoghue, B. (2015). Activities wise and otherwise – The career of Sir Henry Augustus Robinson 1898–1922 . Dublin: Irish Academic Press. O’Halpin, E. (1991). The civil service and the political system. Administration, 38 (4), 283-302. Reamonn, S. (1981). The Revenue Commissioners. History of the Revenue Commissioners . Dublin: Institute of Public Administration. Whitaker, T. K. (1954). The

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New Concepts for Rural Development in the Strategies and Policies of the European Union

: From Academic Idea to Political Instrument, the Surprising Career of a Concept and the Difficulties Involved. 8. Kardas, M. (2014), Inteligentna specjalizacja – nowa koncepcja polityki innowacyjnej. Optimum . Studia Ekonomiczne, 2 (50), 121-135. 9. Komisja Europejska (2006). Polityka Unii Europejskiej w zakresie rozwoju obszarów wiejskich na lata 2007-2013 , Luksemburg. 10. Kłodziński, M. (2006), Aktywizacja gospodarcza obszarów wiejskich . Warszawa: IRWiR PAN, SGGW. 11. Kokocińska, K. (2010). Polityka regionalna w Polsce i w Unii

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Colonial Bureaucrats, Institutional Transplants, and Development in the 20th Century

National Lottery or the Tourism Bureau. Jonathan Lawley, »Achievements of the British Colonial Service: A Retrospective View«, in: The Round Table 104 (2015), p.267–280, here p. 275. A multitude of training courses prepared local civil servants for their careers in these new offices. If these structures and the organizational rules by which they worked were well adapted to local practices, there was a good chance of success. This was easier when, for example, an existing department within the former colonial administration was extended in size and functions, and local

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