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Family and Career Reconciliation: Family, Employer and Career Counsellor Perspectives

– family conflict among female factory workers in South Africa. Journal of Economics, Business and Management , 1(1), 30-41. 5. Moen, P. (2003). It’s about time: Couples and careers . ILR Press Books. 6. Neault R.A. & Pickerell D.A. (2005). Dual-career couples: The juggling act. Canadian Journal of Counselling , 39(3), 187-198. 7. Soderberg, A.M. (2006). Narrative interviewing and narrative analysis in a study of a cross-border merger. August Management International Review , 46, 397-416. 8. Virgilaitė-Mečkauskaitė, E. & Mažeikienė, N. (2012

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Utopist with Common Sense. Self-Narration and Career Making in the Works of Ferenc Balázs

Abstract

My study focuses on the self-narration of the young Transylvanian writer and social activist of the first part of the twentieth century, Ferenc Balázs, based on his personal correspondence and his autobiographical works. The medieval tradition of peregrination becomes a journey around the world which later will offer the ideological background of his work, and an evergoing clash between cultural traditions. Both his literary work and social achievement are characterized by premodern nostalgia for rural life mixed with utopian socialist ideas. The task of shaping a traditionalist, rural community according to modern idea becomes a token of individual achievement in his works. Balázs’s self-narration is contrasted in the memoirs of his wife and co-worker, Christine Frederiksen (The Alabaster Village), narrated from the special point of view of the stranger. Her interpretation comes to complete a story filled with complex interactions of cultural representations.

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The Frost in Faulkner: Walls and Borders of Modern Metaphor

Abstract

My paper discusses the dialogue between Robert Frost’s verse and William Faulkner’s works: from the first poems he published as a young writer, especially in his debut volume The Marble Faun (1924), to The Hamlet (1940), an acknowledged novel of maturity. Three world-famous poems: “Birches,” “Mending Wall,” “Nothing Gold Can Stay” will represent here Frost’s metaphorical counterpart. The allegorical borders thus crossed are those between Frost’s lyrical New England setting and the Old South of Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha diegesis; between (conventional patterns of) Romanticism and Modernism – in both writers’ cases; between poetry and prose; between “live metaphor” and “emplotment” (applying Paul Ricoeur’s theory of “semantic innovation”); between (other conventional patterns of) regionalism and (actual) universality. Frost’s uniqueness among the American modern poets owes much of its vital energy to his mock-bucolic lyrical settings, with their dark dramatic suggestiveness. In my paper I hope to prove that Frost’s lesson was a decisive inspiration for Faulkner, himself an atypical modern writer. If Faulkner’s fiction is pervaded by poetry, this is so because he saw himself as a “poet among novelists.” Faulkner actually started his career under the spell of Frost’s verse – at least to the same extent to which he had once emulated the spirit of older and remoter poets, such as Keats or Swinburne.

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Critical Reception of William Faulkner’s
The Sound and the Fury in America and in Romania

Abstract

The history of reception of William Faulkner’s most cherished work, The Sound and the Fury, tellingly reveals the changes that have occurred in reader attitude toward the novel since its first publication in 1929. The main purpose of this paper is to explore the modalities of interpretation employed by three, culturally and historically distinct “interpretive communities” (Fish 1980): American literary critics and reviewers evaluating the novel upon its first publication, Romanian literary critics and reviewers expressing their opinion on the Romanian translation of the novel published in 1971, and contemporary Internet bloggers and commenters discussing their reading experience with the novel.

Relying on Hans Robert Jauss’s notions of “aesthetic distance” and “horizon of expectation” (Jauss 1970, 1982), I have raised two questions that I will try to answer at the end of this paper. First, I would like to see whether the literary career of The Sound and the Fury follows the trajectory from initial rejection to wide acceptance with increasing aesthetic value, as predicted by Jauss’s theory. Second, I am interested in finding out whether those features of the novel that were initially perceived as unfamiliar and incomprehensible were indeed incorporated into the later readers’ horizon of expectations, so that they no longer pose problems for the readers.

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Forms of Recall – Politics of Memory. Memory as the Non-Chronological Narrative Form of Historical-Political Identity Quest in the Kádár Regime and Its Survival in the Postcommunist Period

, egy komoly filmrendező pályaképe. [Zoltán Fábri: Trees and Ivies, the Career of a Serious Filmmaker.] Budapest: Vince. Murai, András. 2008. Film és kollektív emlékezet: Magyar múltfilmek a rendszerváltozás után. [Film and Collective Memory: Post-Communist Hungarian Films of the Past.] Szombathely: Savaria University Press. Radnóti, Sándor. 2010a. “Sánta Ferenc (1927-2008).” In Az Egy és a Sok: Bírálatok és méltatások. [The One and the Many: Criticism and Appreciation], 48-52. Pécs: Jelenkor. Radnóti, Sándor. 2010b

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Assessing the Impact of Communications Strategy and Ethical Positioning on the Resilience of a Political Career Facing Scandal: Critical Analysis of Sexual Scandals within American Politics

Abstract

Throughout the evolution of public political discourse we have repeatedly seen the effects of scandals on the careers of many politicians. Although the cultural and societal norms that have traditionally dictated the results of such scandals have changed dramatically within the last two centuries, I believe that the aftermath of these scandals may be better understood by analyzing and comparing the politician’s previously established public image to the scandal at hand. I will argue that a negative impact only occurs if and when there is a clear contradiction of character that presents the politician as a deceitful or hypocritical person in the media sphere and therefore the eyes of the public

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Among Birds and Net(Work)S: Material and Social Practices in the Trajectory of Ornithologist Emilie Snethlage (1868–1929)

Abstract

In the course of her career, German ornithologist Emilie Snethlage (1868-1929), who worked in Brazil in the early twentieth century, was involved in all the steps that characterize the “production” of a specimen for scientific collection: from fieldwork, with the collection and preparation of materials, to their description and publication of results. Each of these stages mobilizes different material practices and sociability networks. During fieldwork or in her museum activities, the fact of being a woman demanded from Snethlage specific strategies for establishing her scientific legitimacy, analyzed in this article, especially her activities related to collecting practices.

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Maria Corinta Ferreira (1922–2003?), “Naturalist at the Museu Dr. Álvaro De Castro, Lourenço Marques [Now Maputo], Mozambique,” 1949–1974

Abstract

In 1940, the naturalist Maria Corinta Ferreira decided to leave the zoology research centre of the board for colonial research (Junta de Investigaçoes Coloniais-JIC), where she felt gender discriminated as a scientist, and compete for the position of naturalist at the Museum Dr. Álvaro de Castro Museum (MAC) located in Lourenço Marques (now Maputo), Mozambique. By benefitting from the knowledge and the entomological collections of museums and scientific institutes in South Africa, for 25 years (1949-1974) she built up a scientific career as a researcher in entomology and achieved international recognition. As a woman, however, she never reached the upper positions in MAC’s hierarchy or in the Scientific Research Institute of Mozambique (IICM), the pretext being her formal academic credentials, notably the fact that she was given the title of Doctor on the basis of her published research, rather than upon completing a PhD.

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Expert at a distance
Barbosa du Bocage and the production of scientific knowledge on Africa

Abstract

The career of José Vicente Barbosa du Bocage (1823‒1907) as director of the Zoological Section of the Museu Nacional de Lisboa (National Museum of Lisbon) followed by the presidency of the Society of Geography of Lisbon is presented in this paper as an example of transfer of expertise between scientific fields, specifically from zoology to geography. Additionally, it explores the connection between scientific credit and political recognition, in the sense of the conflation of Bocage’s taxonomical and zoogeographical work with the colonial agenda of his time. Although Bocage himself never visited Africa, he was part of a generation of Africanists who were members of the Portuguese elite dedicated to African matters and considered exemplary custodians of the political and diplomatic Portuguese international position regarding its African territories.

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A quest for unification with the divine: Crashaw’s Teresa Poems “A Hymn to the Name and Honour of the Admirable Saint Teresa” and “The Flaming Heart”

Abstract

As a metaphysical poet, Richard Crashaw (1613-1649) is recognized for his stylistic experimentation and deep religious faith. In the course of his short life, he became a fellow at Cambridge, was later introduced to Queen Henrietta Marie, Charles I’s wife, in France after his exile during the Interregnum, converted to Catholicism from Anglicanism and was highly influenced by Baroque poetry and the martyrdom of St. Teresa of Avila in his style and themes. He is a poet with a “most holy, humble and genuine soul” and in the last six years of his life, which coincided with a period of great crisis in both personal and professional spheres, he worked intensively on the religious phase of his literary career (Shepherd 1914, p. 1). He reflected his devotion to St. Teresa and to God in his religious poems. Within this context, this study analyses Crashaw’s two Teresian poems, “A Hymn to the Name and Honour of the Admirable Saint Teresa” and “The Flaming Heart” featuring the themes of the quest for divine love and unification with the divine along with Crashaw’s divergence from other metaphysical poets, his affection for the European style(s), and his religious views concerning both his country and other countries in Europe.

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