Search Results

1 - 2 of 2 items :

Clear All
Evaluation of the Usefulness of Selected Computer Programs in the Context of Educating Students of the Environmental Engineering

Abstract

The article presents the evaluation of usefulness of selected computer applications applied in the process of educating students from ordered specialty Environmental Engineering who study at the Silesian University of Technology in the faculty of Energy and Environmental Engineering. The evaluation was carried out by means of the analysis of questionnaires filled in by the graduates of the first cycle degree programme at the aforementioned specialty. The analysis was carried out for both, the area of application of the selected software related to the didactic process and the area of the software application in the predicted professional career of the students surveyed.

Open access
Two English Chemists/Authors/Teachers: John Read and James Riddick Partington

Abstract

John Read and James Partington were both prominent and highly respected academics, chemists, authors and teachers during the middle decades of the 20th century. Their books were widely read throughout this period and played a major role in educating and raising the awareness of chemistry among young people and adults. Today their names are forgotten. The aim of the present article is to re-establish these two remarkable men and to bring them to the forefront of educational programs. An outline is given of their careers as chemists, set against the background of the times they lived in, giving an emphasis to their formidable literary output. Although they had widely contrasting personalities, and were specialists in three different fields of chemistry, Read: organic, Partington: physical and inorganic, they both recognized the great importance of setting chemistry in an historical context. Accordingly, they both wrote many works on the origins and development of chemistry and included much historical material in their textbooks. This added not only a great interest to the subject, but also set it in a broader cultural context, which is so clearly lacking in today’s chemistry teaching programs. A chronological list of their books is given and short contrasting fragments from four of them are analysed. Not only are these books of great interest, but they serve as an outstanding foundation for teaching the principles of chemistry today. A recommendation is made to incorporate one work of each author as compulsory reading material for students today, and in future years.

Open access