Search Results

1 - 4 of 4 items :

  • "17th century" x
  • Book History x
Clear All
Karel Sabina and Sixt Palma Močidlanský

Abstract

The historical story Book of Fate, published by Karel Sabina (1813-1877) in the magazine Květy (Flowers) in 1866, deals with censorship in Bohemia at the beginning of the 17th century. In the romantic tale, Karel Sabina has combined the stories of two printers, Sixt Palma Močidlansky (approximately 1569- 1617) and Ondřej Mizera Jarovsky (†1616), both of whom were known for various censorship scandals. In 1602, Palma was imprisoned and then expelled from Bohemia. The innocent Mizera was even executed in 1616 by Henyk of Valdštejn (1568-1623), the owner of the printing workshop at Dobrovice Castle. The article has revealed what sources Sabina may have used for his work, in which historical figures appear as well. It has even compared the fates of the writer Karel Sabina and the bookprinter Sixt Palma, authors of the 19th and 17th centuries.

Open access
Following the Traces of Books in the Brisigell Family

Abstract

The Brisigells were one of the families that settled in Bohemia in connection with land acquisitions during the Thirty Years’ War. The family achieved its greatest wealth in the second generation at the turn of the 18th century. The third generation suffered a gradual decline, caused i.a. by financial difficulties and debt. After the middle of the 18th century, the family disappeared from Bohemia. The electronic cataloguing of early printed books with systematically recorded provenances has made it possible to identify in the collections of the Strahov Library and the National Library a small set of books previously owned by individual family members. Not only has the analysis enabled insight into the reading interests of the Brisigell family, but it has also provided information on the wandering of the books within the family as well as within friendly and business relations with other noblemen in the regions of West and Southwest Bohemia.

Open access
The Višňová Castle Library

Abstract

The core of the Višňová castle library was formed already in the 17th century, probably in Paderborn. Afew volumes come from the property of the archbishop of Cologne, Ferdinand August von Spiegel (1774–1835), but most of the items were collected by his brother Franz Wilhelm (1752–1815), a minister of the Electorate of Cologne, chief construction officer and the president of the Academic Council in Cologne. A significant group is formed by philosophical works: Franz Wilhelm’s collection comprised works by J. G. Herder, I. Kant, M. Mendelsohn as well as H. de Saint-Simon and J. von Sonnenfels. Another group consisted of historical works, e.g. by E. Gibbon; likewise his interest in the history of Christianity is noticeable. The library contains a total of more than 6,200 volumes, including 40 manuscripts, 3 incunabula and 15 printed books from 16th century; more than a half of the collection is formed by early printed books until the end of the 18th century. The other volumes come from the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Volumes from the 17th century include especially Latin printed books on law, and one can perceive interest in collecting books on philosophy. There are many publications devoted to Westphalia; in addition, the library contains a number of binder’s volumes of legal dissertations from the end of the 17th century and the entire 18th century published in diverse German university towns. Further disciplines widely represented in the library are economics and especially agriculture, with the publications coming from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Open access
Several Words on Fragments from Earlier Book Collections in the Library of the Monastery of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin in Roudnice nad Labem

Abstract

The monastery of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin was founded in Roudnice by members of the Roudnice branch of the Lobkowicz family at the beginning of the 17th century, when also its library was established. With its approximately 1,800 volumes, it ranks among smaller, unexplored monastic libraries. Nevertheless, it contains a number of interesting and valuable fragments of earlier private book collections, coming from early modern aristocratic libraries as well as libraries of clergymen from nearby parishes. This article presents the most important of them. Particular attention is devoted to the fragment of the library of Ladislav Zejdlic of Schönfeld, originally placed at Encovany Castle in North Bohemia, and to book donations by members of the Roudnice branch of the Lobkowicz family, the main sponsors of the monastery.

Open access