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Stanislav Morong

Abstract

The article focuses on the specific status of the Armed Forces in the implementation of outsourcing, as one of the cost-benefit optimization methods in military practice. The author points out the need for a comprehensive and strategic monitoring and estimation of the costs, as an elementary assumption of the effective use of public financial resources. Implications of projects implemented without adequate economic analysis are shown on the example of the services outsourcing in military logistics in the Armed Forces of the Slovak Republic.

Open access

Mădălina-Ioana Bădilă

Abstract

What does actually define successful leadership? We all know that one of the fundamental principles of the inter-personal connections represents the similarity reasoning - which means that we are attracted to people like ourselves. Applying this principle to the military organizational background, it can be observed that former leaders who occupy a decision-making position in an organization seek for future appointed leaders with similar ideas and competencies. This can only be achieved through a profound process of individual evaluation, based on the standardization in the military. Nevertheless, it has been frequently demonstrated that standardized tests may not properly dignify the leader’s skills. Therefore, we can avoid being deprived of our personal aptnesses by expanding our knowledge in the matter of successful leading skills through accepting and implementing innovative leadership perspectives such as the one WICS model presents. The abbreviated model involves the harmonious transposition of specific components that define successful leaders through the synthesis of the intelligence, creativity and wisdom.

Open access

Mihai-Bogdan Alexandrescu, Daniel-Sorin Constantin and Marius Milandru

Abstract

Management, both as a science and as a reality, exists and applies to all hierarchical levels and segments of activity, including logistics. Military logistics ensures and maintains the necessary conditions for the large units and units to be able to fulfill their missions and objectives in the best possible conditions, both in peacetime and in other situations, crisis, war, etc. Its functional areas are specific to supply, maintenance, movement and transport, medical and veterinary support, and service provision. In this context, it can be said that the management of military logistics represents the science and the art of using the material resources, as well as the management of the human resources specialized in the logistic field, in order to achieve the objectives of the organization

Open access

Juhani Hämäläinen, Jari Sormunen, Jari Rantapelkonen and Juha-Pekka Nikkarila

). Taistelut, kokemus ja tieto. Näkemys sotatieteellisestä viestitaktiikasta. Viestikoulu, Loimaa. Hämäläinen J. S. (2008). Hierarchic parameter structures for military operational analysis, Proceedings of 2nd Nordic Military Analysis Symposium, Stockholm. Hämäläinen J. S. (2011). Focus group: data farming in support of strategic operational analysis, Scythe: Proceedings of International Data Farming Workshop 23, : 29-32, Riihimäki. Kasputis S., and Ng H.C. (2000), Composable simulations, Proceedings of the 2000 Winter

Open access

Heidi Hirvasoja-Korkee, Leena Holopainen, Asko Tolvanen and Jukka Leskinen

References Adlof, S. M., Catts, H. W., & Lee, J. (2010). Kindergarten predictors of second versus eighth grade reading comprehension impairments. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 43(4), 332-345. Appelqvist-Schmidlechner. (2011). Time Out! Getting Life Back On Track. A psychosocial support programme targeted at young men exempted from compulsory military or civil service. Acta Universitatis Tamperensis, 1653. Tampere University Press. Appelqvist-Schmidlechner, Upanne, Henriksson, Parkkola & Stengård. (2010

Open access

Marek Kociuba, Zofia Ignasiak, Anna Sebastjan, Katarzyna Kochan, Ireneusz Cichy, Andrzej Dudkowski, Marcin Ściślak and Sławomir Kozieł

M, Kozieł S, Chakraborty R. 2016. Sex differences in digit ratio (2d:4d) among military and civil cohorts at a military academy in Wrocław, Poland. J Biosoc Sci 48(5):658-71. Kociuba M, Kozieł S, Chakraborty R, Ignasiak Z. 2017. Sports preference and digit ratio (2D:4D) among female students in Wrocław, Poland. J Biosoc Sci 49(5):623-33. Kozieł S, Kociuba M, Chakraborty R, Ignasiak Z. 2017. Physical Fitness And Digit Ratio (2D:4D) In Male Students From Wrocław, Poland. Coll Antropol 41(1):31-7. Kozieł S, Kociuba M, Chakraborty R, Sitek A

Open access

Crenguţa Mihaela Macovei

Abstract

The concept of academic self-efficacy has its origins in the social cognitive theory developed by A. Bandura and it refers to the conviction of a person that he/she can successfully achieve a certain academic goal or can solve a specific task. In this research we tested the psychometric qualities of the Perceived Academic Efficacy Scale in the context of military higher education. This scale is taken from PALS - The Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scales - and it demonstrated adequate psychometric properties that make it suitable for measuring the level of academic self-efficacy of military students. All six items on the scale load a single factor; the tested model showed a good fit

Open access

Júlia Hornyacsek

Abstract

The events of recent times have proven that disasters have become part of our lives. The greatest danger is caused by the damage to and the destruction of the built environment, which makes the population vulnerable. Nowadays, in order to provide effective actions against disasters, complex disaster management systems have evolved throughout Europe, and protection has become an all-society task. Military forces of a given country are also involved in this task. The question arises what kind of damages are caused to the built environment by disasters, how the elimination of damages is resolved and what role the reformed military forces may have in it. In this article, the author has set out to analyze the characteristics of incident sites created by disasters, identifying their impacts on the built environment, as well as the tasks or capabilities needed to perform these tasks. In the light of this, she investigates if military organizations, through their basic function, have all the capabilities that, without special improvements, can make them capable of effectively contributing to the provision of rescue tasks.

Open access

Eugeniusz Sobczyński and Jerzy Pietruszka

Abstract

The history of the development of military aeronautical charts began immediately before the First World War. The first charts created at that time did not differ much from topographic maps. Air planes were fairly slow back then and had a small range of action, which meant that the charts were developed at the scale of 1:200,000. When speed of aircraft increased, it soon turned out that this scale was too large. Therefore, many countries began to create charts with smaller scales: 1:300,000 and 1:500,000. The International Map of the World 1:1,000,000 (IMW) was frequently used for continental flights prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, while 1:3,500,000 and 1:5,000,000 maps were commonly used for intercontinental flights.

The Second World War brought a breakthrough in the field of aeronautical chart development, especially after 7 December 1941, when the USA entered into the war. The Americans created more than 6000 map sheets and published more than 100 million copies, which covered all continents. In their cartographic endeavours, they were aided foremost by the Brits.

On the other hand, the Third Reich had more than 1,500 officers and about 15,000 soldiers and civil servants involved in the development of maps and other geographic publications during the Second World War. What is more, the Reich employed local cartographers and made use of local source materials in all the countries it occupied. The Germans introduced one new element to the aeronautical charts – the printed reference grid which made it easier to command its air force.

The experience gained during the Second World War and local conflicts was for the United States an impulse to undertake work on the standardization of the development of aeronautical charts. Initially, standardization work concerned only aeronautical charts issued by the US, but after the establishment of NATO, standardization began to be applied to all countries entering the Alliance. The currently binding NATO STANAGs (Standardization Agreements) distinguish between operational charts and special low-flight charts. The charts are developed in the WGS-84 coordinate system, where the WGS-84 ellipsoid of rotation is the reference surface. The cylindrical transverse Mercator projection was used for the scale of 1:250,000, while the conformal conic projection was used for other scales.

The first aeronautical charts issued at the beginning of the 20th century contained only a dozen or so special symbols concerning charts’ navigational content, whereas currently the number of symbols and abbreviations found on such charts exceeds one hundred. The updating documents are published every 28 days in order to ensure that aeronautical charts remain up-to-date between releases of their subsequent editions. It concerns foremost aerial obstacles and air traffic zones.

The aeronautical charts published by NATO have scales between 1:50,000 and 1:500,000 and the printed Military Grid Reference System (MGRS), while the aeronautical charts at scales between 1:250,000 and 1:2,000,000 contain the World Geographic Reference System (GEOREF).

Nowadays, modern military air planes are characterised by their exceptional combat capabilities in terms of speed, range and manoeuvrability. Aside from aircraft, contemporary armed forces make increasingly frequent use of aerial robots, drones and unmanned cruise missiles. This is why, there has been a noticeable increase, especially in NATO, in the amount of work devoted to the standardization and development of aeronautical charts, as well as deepening of knowledge of navigation and aeronautical information.

Open access

Juha-Matti Lehtonen and Henry Isojärvi

Årsredovisning 2013 (Swedish defence force annual report), FMV - FSV - Grafisk produktion, Stockholm, Sweden. Försvarsmakten. (2015). About the Swedish Armed Forces. Retrieved 11.5.2015 from http://www.forsvarsmakten.se/en/ German and Swedish Ministries of Defence (2010). Intensifying Military Cooperation in Europe - “Ghent Initiative”. Berlin and Stockholm, German and Swedish MoD. Retrieved 27.5.2015 from http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meetdocs/2009_2014/documents/sede/dv/sede260511deseinitiative_/sede260511deseinitiative