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M. Sułowski and A. Ciaś

References S.C. Mitchell, A.S. Wronski, A. Cias, M. Stoytchev, Proc. PM 2 TEC'99, MPIF, Princeton, New Jersey 2, Part 7 - P/M steels, 129 (1999). A. Cias, Development and Properties of Fe-Mn-(Mo)-(Cr)-C Sintered Structural Steels (AGH-UST, Uczelniane Wydawnictwo Naukowo-Dydaktyczne, Kraków 2004). M. Sulowski, A. Cias, Proc. PM 2004 World Congress & Exhibition, EPMA, Vienna, Austria 3 , 93 (2004). M. Youseffi, S.C. Mitchell, A.S. Wronski, A. Cias, Powder

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Dariusz Knez

Exhibition, Denver, Colorado, USA, October 1996. Li S., Purdy C., 2010. Maximum Horizontal Stress and Wellbore Stability while Drilling: Modeling and Case Study. SPE Latin American & Caribbean Petroleum Engineering Conference, Lima, Peru, December 2010. Nagy S., Siemek J., 2011. Shale gas in Europe: the state of the technology - challenges and opportunities. Arch. Min. Sci., Vol. 56, No 4, p. 727-760. Pinka J., Wittenberg G., Engel J., 2007. Borehole Mining. Kosice. Śliwa T., Kotyza J., 2003. Application of

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Yumiko Nunokawa

: Painter and Composer, Collected Essays and Notes, 1906-1989. Vilnius: Vaga. Hofstätter, H. H., 1965. Symbolismus und die Kunst der Jahrhundertwende (Symbolism and art of the turn of the century). Cologne: Dumont. Kikuchi, S. ed., 1980. Porando hizo ukiyo-e meisakuten (Exhibition of ukiyo-e Masterpieces in Polish Collection: exhibition catalogue). Tokyo: Kyodo Tsushin. Koval, A., 1994. Whistler in His Time. London: Tate Gallery Publications. Król, A., 2007. An Image of a Floating World: Japanese Art

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Darko Belavič, Andraž Bradeško, Marina Santo Zarnik and Tadej Rojac

References [1] Partsch, U., Arndt, D., Georgi, H. (2007). A new concept for LTCC-based pressure sensors. Proc. of 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Ceramic Interconnect and Ceramic Microsystems Technologies CICMT 2007 , Denver, Colorado, USA, 367–372, CD-ROM. [2] Belavič, D., Hrovat, M., Pavlin, M., Santo Zarnik, M. (2003). Thick-film technology for Sensor Applications. Informacije MIDEM , 33(1), 45–50. [3] Maeder, T., Jacq, C., Briol, H., Ryser, P. (2003). High-strength Ceramic Substrates for Thick-film Sensor Applications. Proc

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Dana Altman

Abstract

The article discusses the recent international interest in contemporary Romanian art and its growth in market share, with a focus on the United States. The theme is followed thorough in numerous museum exhibitions, increased collector following, art fair presence, gallery representation and auction activity initially in Europe and the United States. The phenomenon is discussed both in the context of the larger international movement conducive to the contemporary art price bubble, and in that of the local socio-economic changes. My chief interest lies in the factors leading up to the entry of post 1989 Romanian art in the global arena as a manifestation of market forces in the field. The analysis follows its grass roots local emergence through non-profit institutions, individual artists, small publications, low budget galleries, as well as the lack of contribution (with few notable exceptions) of state institutions, while pointing out the national context of increasing deregulation of social support systems resulting in lack of focus on cultural manifestations. The conclusion is that the recent ascent of contemporary Romanian art (and coincidentally, the award winning contemporary Romanian cinematography) is a fortuitous convergence of various factors, among which, increased international mobility and sharing. At the same time, it is also the result of the evolution of various individual artists that pursued a form of art rooted in Romanian artistic tradition but with a focus on the symbolic figurative. The result is a personal semiotics of raising the mundane to extraordinary levels that reconfigured the anxiety of entering a new system into an unmistakable and lasting visual language.

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Boris Lipták and Barbora Vitázková

Abstract

Introduction of non-indigenous exotic species to new areas, where they may establish viable populations and become invasive, is a considerable problem in the protection of nature worldwide, as these species may alter the indigenous species population structure and potentially even decrease the biodiversity. The European fauna underwent through major negative changes on the continent and nowadays, it experiences another new treat, represented by the expanding aquarium pet trade, and with it, associated species (and disease) introductions. Exotic freshwater crustaceans are one of the taxa widely incorporated in the business, counting a remarkable number of species. Recent records of the exotic marbled crayfish or Marmorkrebs (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis) in German in open ecosystems in Slovakia pointed to human-mediated introductions associated with aquarium pet trade in the country. In this regard, a study of the aquarium pet trade both in expositions and shops and online was assessed. Several crustacean taxa are available both in pet trade exhibitions and online through the Internet. Altogether 26 different species were identified in the aquarium trade in Slovakia. These are Procambarus fallax f. virginalis, P. clarkii, P. alleni, Cherax quadricarinatus, C. destructor, C. holthuisi, C. peknyi, Cambarellus patzcuarensis and C. diminutus occurring in the aquarium pet trade in Slovakia (n = 9). Procambarus fallax f. virginalis, P. clarkii and C. patzuarensis are the most common in this regard. There is also a quantity of other related taxa in the aquarium pet trade in Slovakia, mainly Caridina spp. (n = 5), Neocaridina spp. (n = 4), Atyopsis moluccensis, Atya gabonensis, Arachnochium kulsiense and several taxa of exotic crabs (n = 5) belonging to three different genera (Cardiosoma, Geosesarma and Gecarinus) present. Neocaridina davidi is identified as the most frequent in this regard. As some of the species can become established and form viable populations in natural ecosystems in Europe, we alert the public to handle the animals responsibly and thus maintain and protect indigenous European fauna.

Open access

Klára Perlíková

Abstract

The article deals with selected issues which - as we perceive it - can provide an insight into what the Lakota consider essential and generic for their self-identification with their culture (What does it mean to be Lakota?). The study is based on observations gained during fieldwork research, and issues in the text reflect data collected within this period. As a result, we examine the following issues: tribal museums in Lakota reservations, Native perception of time, selected issues of Lakota religion, and Lakota relation to the land and environment they live in and to the world on a global scale. We believe that in all these issues we can also recognize an underlying dual structure which - in its most general meaning - could be understood as a dichotomy of Native and Western/Euro-American worldview and mind-set. The question was how non-Native elements distort or affect the system of Lakota culture. In the section on tribal museums and perception of time we have shown that circular way of thinking about the course of the world which is, according to Donald Fixico (FIXICO 2009), characteristic of all Native cultures affects the way tribal museums organize and present their exhibitions. In this case, the influence of the Native/Euro-American dualism does not have to be necessarily negative. The same can be said about another example where the dichotomy projects itself - in the issue of Lakota relation to the land or Unci Maka (Grandmother Earth): Though Lakota religion and identity is regionally bound (BUCKO 2008), their concern for this integral part of their Native-self can surprisingly well fit into the global issue of protection of environment. On the case of Lakota struggle to stop construction of a KXL pipeline1 we demonstrate how the same (Native/Euro-American) duality interacts and through which the Lakota (Native, regionallybound) voice is strengthened by its non-Native counterpart and vice versa.

Open access

Yanko T. Iliev, Sasha A. Kristeva and Maria G. Prancheva

ABSTRACT

The rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) is a venomous viper inhabiting the southeastern parts of the United States. It is not found in the Balkans and Europe habitats. Subjects of the species are grown and seen in museums, exhibitions and terrariums, and sometimes in private collections. This may generate potentially toxic exposures to the venom in accidental contact. Acute poisoning with rattlesnake poison in Bulgaria is exotic, rare and even casuistic.

The venom of the rattlesnake exhibits neuropathic, proteolytic and hemolytic activities. Antivenom is not currently easily available in Bulgaria - it is not usually stored in hospitals because it is very rarely used and therefore rather expensive. We present a case of multiple envenomation (two different occasions) of one and the same person who kept rattlesnakes in a private terrarium. Local toxic syndrome was observed with burning and stinging pain at bite site combined with limited hemorrhage and necrosis. The hemolytic reaction and the local toxic results were successfully managed without resorting to any specific antidotal therapy.

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J. P. Adams, R. J. Rousseau and T. D. Leininger

Abstract

Open-pollinated progeny tests of American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.), which included 55 open-pollinated families selected from several prior Westva - co progeny tests and seed orchards and six control-pollinated families were established in 2002 and 2003. The half-sibling families were planted at two sites in western Kentucky and southeastern Missouri. The six full-sibling families, generated from selections based on exhibition of parental disease resistance and susceptibility to a variety of diseases, were also planted near Stoneville, MS at the US Forest Service Center for Bottomland Hardwoods Research. All full-sibling families planted at the Stoneville site were inoculated in the fall 2002 with the leaf-scorch-causing bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa. Diameter and height data for trees of both half- and full-sibling families were recorded at ages three, five, seven, and nine at the various sites. Bacterial leaf scorch disease presence was also recorded as symptomatic or asymptomatic/ mildly symptomatic. Average family heritability across ages was 0.58, 0.50, and 0.55 for height, diameter, and volume, respectively, indicating that increased growth traits can be gained from family selection. In conjunction with derived age-age correlations, selection based on age-five data results in the greatest gain per unit time for age nine gains for half-sibling families. Breeding for bacterial leaf scorch resistance can also be successfully undertaken if proper selection and breeding of two resistant parents are undertaken which can result in a 4.5 fold decrease in the probability in symptoms of offspring by age nine. Results indicate a large potential for increased growth and disease resistance in American sycamore through traditional breeding.

Open access

Dorota Filipczak

Abstract

The article offers a reading of “Through the Panama” by Malcom Lowry in light of an intertext connected with Polish literature. Lowry mentions a short story “The Lighthouse Keeper of Aspinwall” by the Polish writer Henryk Sienkiewicz, the Nobel prize winner for the whole of his literary output. What Lowry stresses in his intertextual allusion is the perilous illumination that the eponymous lighthouse keeper experiences. The article contends that the condition of the lighthouse keeper anticipates that of the Lowry protagonist who in “Through the Panama” fears death by his own book, or, to take Lowry’s other phrase, being “Joyced in his own petard.” Basing her analysis on Mieke Bal’s idea of a participatory exhibition where the viewer decides how to approach a video installation, and can do so by engaging with a single detail, Filipczak treats Lowry’s text as a multimodal work where such a detail may give rise to a reassessment of the reading experience. Since the allusion to the Polish text has only elicited fragmentary responses among the Lowry critics, Filipczak decides to fill in the gap by providing her interpretation of the lighthouse keeper’s perilous illumination mentioned by Lowry in the margins of his work, and by analyzing it in the context of major Romantic texts, notably the epic poem Master Thaddeus by Adam Mickiewicz whose words trigger the lighthouse keeper’s experience, and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whose text is quoted in the margins of “Through the Panama.” This choice allows to throw a different light on Lowry’s work which is also inhabited by echoes of futurist attitude to the machine and the Kafkaesque fear of being locked in one of the many locks of the canal “as if in experience.”