Search Results

71 - 80 of 747 items :

  • "modernity" x
Clear All
Influence of Machine Exploitation Effectiveness on Furniture Production Quality Level

Abstract

One of the most important factors determining the company‘s capacity to produce high quality products is the level of machinery operation effectiveness. Companies having modern machinery are characterized by high productivity. To obtain a high quality product, the equipment should be properly used, without any failure, which contributes significantly to the exploitation level increase. The modernity level and the exploitation effectiveness level for chosen machine producing furniture components in relation to the product quality level were analysed in the paper. As a result of the research findings analysis, proposals for corrective actions with regard to machinery maintenance and production processes were presented.

Open access
The Topicality of the Humanism of Chartres

Abstract

The main question this article arises is about the nowadays pertinence of the humanist heritage of Chartres. The most radical modernity cannot avoid a permanent cohabitation with the past, with the magic of the cathedral and the memory of an emotional power. Medieval thought has set the standards of a sustainable humanisation that has lost nothing of its topicality. The harmonious equilibrium of eternal beauty, transparent in the spiritual timeless message of Chartres attests that the medieval concept of humanism is still intelligible for the modern sensitivity

Open access
Body, Sensuousness, Eros and the New Aesthetic Order from Schiller to Rushdie

Abstract

In the present article, I look into the culture-building power of Eros from Schiller’s ideas of “the aesthetic state of mind” in Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man, through the Pre-Raphaelites’ eroticism to the nineteenthcentury fin de siècle aestheticized homoeroticism and beyond. I argue that eroticism is a reaction to the increasing sense of alienation brought about by bourgeois modernity. The “moments” and texts used to illustrate the thesis that eroticism shaped an alternative order are far from exhausting a very large list which could add nuances to the argument. The body is one of the essential aspects tackled, since eroticism cannot be conceived in its absence. The body may be an object of desire around which imagination weaves its yarn, or a blank page to be inscribed, or a danger zone, or a hypertrophied space projected by the lover’s longing for fusion. Eroticism in Salman Rushdie’s novels is the focus of my approach after a survey of some landmarks of erotic imagination. I argue that his novels are a new stage of the imagination infused by Eros. The article probes into how two centuries of aesthetic modernity have been shaped by the reality principle proposed by Schiller and how that essentially erotic model has suffered changes in time.

Open access
Editorial

Works Cited Appadurai, Arjun. Fear of Small Numbers: An Essay on the Geography of Anger . Durham: Duke University Press, 2006. Bauman, Zygmunt. Liquid Modernity [2 nd Edition]. Cambridge: Polity, 2012. Bauman, Zygmunt. “From Pilgrim to Tourist – or a Short History of Identity” in Hall, S. & du Gay, P. (2011) Questions of Cultural Identity . London: Sage, 1996. Bauman, Zygmunt and Leonidas Donskis. Moral Blindness: The Loss of Sensitivity in Liquid Modernity . Cambridge: Polity, 2013. “Europe migrant crisis.” BBC News . British

Open access
The Historical Grounds of the Turkish Women’s Movement

Abstract

In this article the authors would like to present a history of the Turkish feminist movement. The roots of the feminist movement go back to the last decades of Ottoman Empire in Turkey when westernisation had started to take place. During the firts decade of the Republic many steps were taken to enable women to get involved in public, political and professional life and to encourage more equality in family matters. Women’s emancipation became a significant symbol of modernity. Kemalist reforms attemted to create a new woman who could take place in public sphere with the men. During the 1970’s the movement of women almost disappeared in nationalist and socialist movements. After the military intervention in 1980 new female actors (such as Islamist, Kurdish, Alevite) started to present new demands and change the nature of feminist movement in Turkey.

Open access
The Lyric of Objectiveness. "Criticism of Poets" and the Jan Tarasin's Painting

Liryka przedmiotowości. "Krytyka poetów" wobec malarstwa Jana Tarasina

Open access
Of Masters, Men, Machines and (M)others: Revisiting the Virgin and the Dynamo in a Post/Trans-Human Context

Abstract

The Education of Henry Adams owes its cultural cachet, in part, to Adams’ elaboration of a dichotomy that has pitted religion against science and technology. Though Western ideologies of modernity have viewed religion in rather negative terms, the current revival of religiosity in the postist context (post-modern, post-communist, post-colonial, post-human) invites a reconsideration of the role of religious belief, practice and objects/symbols in the current society. This article discusses Henry Adams’s dichotomy of the Virgin and the Dynamo, and recontextualizes it from a post-human perspective. It argues that the return of religiosity or spirituality, in its multiple forms, is an ethical stance that signals a cultural need for the feminine values of care, solidarity, affection and affiliation.

Open access
’...and Miraculously Post-Modern Became Ost-Modern’: How On or About 1910 and 1924 Karel Čapek Helped to Add and Strike off the ‘P’

Abstract

Virginia Woolf and Karel Čapek produced direct responses to the British Empire Exhibition in the forms of – in Woolf’s case – a scathing essay entitled ‘Thunder at Wembley’ and – in Čapek’s case – a (P)OstModernist travelogue later published as part of ‘Letters from England’ translated into English in 1925 and banned by the Nazis as well as the Communists. This research paper juxtaposes modernity in Central Europe with its ‘Other’ – that in Western Europe – by exploring Woolf and Čapek’s durée réelle between 1910 and 1924. It offers an analysis of Karel Čapek’s (P)OstModern legacies, placing Prague right on the modernist centre stage. The socio-political contribution of Central European regional modernism in Čapek’s work is increasingly vital to the contemporary Europe of Brexit and refugee and migrant crises, and beyond.

Open access
”Hvid Udenpå. Indeni er Jeg Helt... Grå”.1
HYBRIDE IDENTITETER i JAKOB EJERSBOS ”AFRIKA-TRILOGI”

ABSTRACT

The aim of the article is to discuss the problem of hybrid identity, as it is presented in Jakob Ejersbo’s “Africa-trilogy” (2009). As the methodological framework for the analysis serve some of the main notions borrowed from postcolonial studies (as hybridity and contact zone), as well as Zygmunt Bauman’s diagnoses on “the liquid modernity” (among others his understanding of identity and his tourist and vagabond metaphors). The latter ones indicate the universal dimension of Ejersbo’s prose, which until now has been read mainly from the postcolonial critique’s position and as a polemical comment on the Scandinavian self-understanding as a region, which has never been included in the colonial project and which sets an example on providing humanitarian aid.

Open access
Constructing and Crossing Boundaries in a New (?) Europe

Constructing and Crossing Boundaries in a New (?) Europe

During the last two decades, discourses over the transition process shifted toward a theoretical diversity and a deeper understanding of ‘how modernity was reworked in postsocialist context’. It was widely argued that changing social relations were shaped not only by norms and institutions of Neoliberal capitalism, but also by established networks, institutional and regulatory structures and actors that/who gave diverse responses to the profound and thorough transformation of the society. This paper aims at understanding how geopolitical discourses over the Balkan and its place in the ‘new Europe’ shaped social relations and produced daily practices nested into those webs, through the perception and interpretations of post-socialist transformation by Hungarian migrants who left the war-hit Yugoslavia.

Open access