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Piotr Majewski

Pojęcie metafory w języku polskiej krytyki artystycznej w drugiej połowie lat pięćdziesiątych XX wieku

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Augustine Okola Bardi

Approach in Art Therapy in Children with Behavourial Problem. Review of Artistic Education, 11/12, 284-285. 5. Bankole, O. (2004). The Missing Link in Academic Training and Professionalism in Art and Design in Nigeria. Creative Dialogue: Journal of the Society of Nigerian Artists, 2, 15. 6. Wangboje, S. (1998). Wangboje: Thirty Years on the Road: A Retrospective. Sponsored by Mobil Oil. (Exhibition Catalogue), p. 9. 7. Stride in Time. An Exhibition Catalogue of Paintings, Ceramics, Textiles, Graphics and Sculptures by the

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Rafał Smulski

immobile and mobile watersaturation . SPE Paper 28451. Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. New Orleans, Sept. 25-28, 1994. Geertsma J., 1974. Estimating the coefficient of inertial resistance in fluid flow through porous media . SPE Paper 4706. Society of Petroleum Engineers Journal, Oct. 1974, p. 445-450. Hagoort J., 1988. Fundamentals of gas reservoir engineering . Elsevier, 1988. Jones S.C., 1987. Using the inertial coefficient, β, to characterize heterogeneity in reservoir rock . SPE Paper 16949. SPE Annual

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François Giraud

Abstract

Although the intermediality of Jean-Luc Godard’s films of the 1980s has been extensively analysed, especially the tableaux vivants in Passion (1982), little has been said on the intermedial dimension of gesture in the director’s work of this period. The article investigates how the gestural flows in Godard’s First Name: Carmen (Prénom Carmen, 1983) interrelate heterogeneous forms, meanings, arts, and media. The interconnection between the gestures of the musicians who are rehearsing Beethoven’s late string quartets and the lovers’ gestures, inspired by Rodin’s sculptures, gives cohesion to the hybrid aesthetics of the film. Gesture is the element which incorporates, develops, and sets in motion the features of the other arts, not only by creating an in-between space that forges links between media, but especially by exhibiting the process of making itself. Indeed, the relationship between the performing, musical, and visual arts is made visible in the exhibition of the corporeal effort of making (whether it be making music, film, or love) that tends to open the boundaries separating the different arts. The aural and visual qualities of gestures communicate between themselves, generating rhythms and forms that circulate in the continuous flow of moving images. By fostering the analogy between the gesture of carving, of performing music, and of making film, Godard highlights what unites the arts in cinema, while feeding on their differences.

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Martina Ohlídalová, Karel Křenek, Jana Tvrzníková, Michal Pech and Radka Šefců

Abstract

In 2017, the National Museum commemorated the bicentenary of the discovery of the Manuscript of Dvůr Králové and the Manuscript of Zelená Hora by further material research into both works and especially by an exhibition of their originals. The main aims of this research into the manuscripts included the documentation and evaluation of their current physical condition and the mapping of the effect of the microchemical analyses performed in the context of the disputes over the authenticity of the manuscripts between the middle of the 19th century and the 1970s. For the achievement of these objectives, a detailed documentation of all the pages of the manuscripts in different types of lighting (visible direct, lateral, transmitted, ultraviolet, infrared), optical microscopy, and the identification of the degradation productions of damaged places by means of X-ray fluorescence analysis and Raman spectroscopy were used. This provided new information on the current physical condition of the manuscripts and documentation of the damage caused by historical microchemical testing. In addition, some previously unpublished historical tests were identified, thus offering a new perspective on some current damage of the two manuscripts.

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Vlasta Reittererová

Abstract

In June of 1892, Smetana’s Prodaná nevěsta (The Bartered Bride) was heard in Vienna for the first time as part of a guest appearance by the Czech National Theatre at the International Musical and Theatrical Exhibition. The clear success of the opera and of the performances of the National Theatre ensemble was reflected in the reviews of the Viennese critics, who were calling for German-language performances of Prodaná nevěsta on the stage of the Court Opera. On the basis of information from the archives of the Court Opera (Haus-, Hof- und Staatsarchiv), one can document the reasons why, as it turned out, the first Viennese (and German-language) stage to produce the opera was the Theater an der Wien in April 1893, and why the premiere at the Court Opera did not occur until three years later. The study also devotes attention to the first performers for both productions of Prodaná nevěsta and to the circumstances of the two Viennese premieres, which opened up the pathway to other stages around the world after a thirty-year delay.

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Kateřina Dobrovolná

Abstract

Saint John’s Museum in Nepomuk, which is dedicated to the Saint of the same name (who was a local native), was reopened in March 2015. It’s original name was the Museum of St. John’s and other religious monuments and the museum was founded in 1930 by Father Jan Strnad. The institution was subsequently closed in the mid-20th Century. The study cursorily reveals the history of the Museum and the overall history and architecture of the building, where the Museum is located and its present status and particularly the reconstruction and the equipment of the Museum’s interior from the point of view of the Museum’s employees, specifically in regard to any problematical display cases. Three semistructured interviews were conducted with people who had contributed to the Museum in varying degrees, focused on the reconstruction of the Museum. This critical study can be of service not only to the Museum staff but also for other professionals from this area during the reconstruction of exhibitions or the creation of new ones.

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Šárka Vicherová

Abstract

The Czech National Bank issued six commemorative coins in 2016. They are represented by three silver 200-crown pieces celebrating the following anniversaries: the 125th anniversary of the General Land Centennial Exhibition, the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hradec Králové and the 450th birth anniversary of Jan Jessenius. Another issue is represented by one silver 500-crown piece celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Czechoslovak National Council. The first two gold commemorative 5000-crown pieces from the new cycle called ‘Castles’ were produced: the ‘Kost’ Castle and the ‘Bezděz’ Castle. The Castles gold coin cycle is the fourth five-year cycle of gold coins the CNB has issued since 2001. The first, “Ten Centuries of Architecture”, comprising ten 2000-crown coins, was issued between 2001 and 2005. It was followed by the “Industrial Heritage Sites” cycle in 2006–2010 (ten 2500-crown coins). In 2011–2015 ten 5000-crown coins were issued in the Bridges cycle.

Open access

Luboš Polanský and Jaroslava Krákorová

Abstract

On February 22, 2016, the Czech numismatist, historian and museum person Eduard Šimek celebrated his important anniversary – his 80th birthday. Between 1963 and 2005, he spent some 43 years in the National Museum in Prague; first of all, he served as a curator of the numismatic department, and since 1990, he was appointed gradually a research secretary, deputy director-in-general and director of the Historical museum. He wrote more than 400 books, articles, studies and reports, he was a co-author of several exhibitions, he worked as a secretary of the editorial board of the Numismatické listy, and he was an editor of the Sborník vlastivědných prací z Podblanicka, Muzejní a vlastivědná práce / Časopis Společnosti přátel starožitností, and many others. He used to be a member of several editorial boards, research collegia, many committees and commissions, numismatic, historical and museum societies. Since 2005, he has been working for the Pedagogical Museum, and he was awarded the medal of J. A. Komenský for his extraordinary contribution in the field. Parallelly, he taught – and still teaches – numismatics at the Charles University in Prague and at the University of South Bohemia in Budweis. He also gives lectures at the Higher Professional School of Information Services in Prague. He is a honorary member of the Czech Numismatic Society and a correspondent of the Austrian Numismatic Society.

Open access

Monika Sosnowska

ABSTRACT

Drawing on Allan Edgar Poe’s provocative statement that “The death ... of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetic topic in the world” (1951: 369), I will focus on the pivotal role of Shakespeare’s Ophelia in attesting to this assertion. Ophelia’s drowning is probably the most recognizable female death depicted by Shakespeare. Dating back to Gertrude’s “reported version” of the drowning, representations of Ophelia’s eroticized death have occupied the minds of Western artists and writers. Their necrOphelian fantasies materialized as numerous paintings, photographs and literary texts. It seems that Ophelia’s floating dead body is also at the core of postmodern thanatophiliac imagination, taking shape in the form of conventionalized representations, such as: video scenes available on YouTube, amateur photographs in bathtubs posted on photo sharing sites, reproductions and remakes of classical paintings (e.g. John Everett Millais), and contemporary art exhibitions in museums. These references will demonstrate that new cyber story - digital afterlife - is being built around the figure of Shakespearean Ophelia, unearthing the sexual attraction of the lifeless female body.