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L Horvathova and B Mravec

, Lutgendorf SK, Sood AK. Neuroendocrine influences on cancer progression. Brain Behav Immun 30 Suppl, S19–25, 2013. Bauman J, McVary K. Autonomic nerve development contributes to prostate cancer progression. Asian J Androl 15, 713–714, 2013. Bayon Lara AM, Landa Garcia I, Alcalde Escribano J, Rodriguez Dapena S, Ortega Medina L, Balibrea Cantero JL. Colonic carcinogenesis in vagotomyzed rats. Rev Esp Enferm Dig 93, 576–586, 2001. Bergers G, Benjamin LE. Tumorigenesis and the angiogenic switch. Nat Rev Cancer 3, 401–410, 2003. Bjelakovic G, Tasic T

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Ian Flannigan Sprague

Abstract

In contrast to U.S. Federal Indian law, which has classified indigenous tribes as “domestic dependent nations” since the early 19th century, Mexican law has only recently begun to define the political and territorial autonomy of indigenous groups. This paper contrasts the Mexican approach to this problem to that of the United States, first describing Mexico’s 2001’s constitutional reforms and their failure to clarify the nature of tribal sovereignty. It then analyzes recent court cases that protect tribal political and territorial autonomy by applying rights to consultation contained in the International Labor Organization’s Indigenous and Tribal People’s Convention 169 (“ILO 169”) and the Mexican Constitution. It concludes by arguing that in spite of this effort by the courts, Mexican law still requires a comprehensive legislative or diplomatic resolution of the lack of clarity surrounding the political and territorial autonomy of its indigenous groups.

Open access

Živilė Marija Vaicekauskaitė

Abstract

How are small states adjusting to a changing security environment and managing tensions with greater powers in their neighbourhood? Much of the recent literature on small states spends a great deal of time examining challenges to small states and their security policies. Scholars offer several strategies that small states can employ to adjust to a changing security landscape. Small states have two broad options – to focus on their own defence posture, trying to keep their autonomy and stay neutral, or use different cooperative schemes – bandwagon with larger powers, form alliances against dominant powers, or seek shelter and develop hedging strategies. This article reviews survival strategies employed by small states and provides a basis to better understand the behaviour of small states in today’s contested security environment.

Open access

Barbara Mróz

Abstract

The aim of longitudinal research into personality and axiology is to detect what differences, similarities and changes have occurred in these areas over a period of time. The article examines the character of changes in purpose in life in two generations of Polish actors on the basis of the author’s Personality and Axiological Model (MOA). The longitudinal studies and analyses conducted confirmed the influence of variables related to competence, relationships and autonomy (MOA components) on purpose in life spheres (affirmation of life, self-acceptance, goal orientation, sense of freedom, outlook for the future, attitude to death, univariate model). The study produced interesting results in the character and level of similarities and differences between two different generations of actors, which gives insight into the development of a creative person.

Open access

Victoria Serhiyenko, Alexandr Alexandr Serhiyenko and Volodymyr Segin

References 1. Ziegler D. Can diabetic polyneuropathy be successfully treated? MMV Fortschr Med 152: 64-68, 2010. 2. Pop-Busui R. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in diabetes: a clinical perspective. Diabetes Care 33: 434-441, 2010. 3. Serhiyenko VA, Serhiyenko AA, Efimov AS. Long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus (review of literature and own data). J NAMS Ukraine 17: 353-367, 2011. 4. Atisha D, Bhalla MA, Morrison LK et al. A prospective

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Maria Czerwińska-Jasiewicz and Wanda Zagórska

Association. Labouvie-Vief, G. (1982). Dynamic development and mature autonomy: A theoretical prologue. Human Development, 25, 161-191. Labouvie-Vief, G. (1992). A neo-Piagetian perspective on adult cognitive development. In R.J. Sternberg, C.A. Berg (eds.), Intellectual development (pp. 197-228). New York: Cambridge University Press. Majczyna, M. (2000). Podmiotowość a tożsamość [Subjectivity versus identity]. In A. Gałdowa (ed.), Tożsamość człowieka [Human identity] (pp. 35-52). Krakow: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu

Open access

Jurgen Goossens and Pieter Cannoot

Abstract

This paper highlights the most important institutional evolutions of Belgian federalism stemming from the implementation of the sixth state reform (2012-2014). This reform inter alia included a transfer of powers worth 20 billion euros from the federal level to the level of the federated states, a profound reform of the Senate, and a substantial increase in fiscal autonomy for the regions. This contribution critically analyses the current state of Belgian federalism. Although the sixth state reform realized important and long-awaited changes, further evolutions are to be expected. Since the Belgian state model has reached its limits with regard to complexity and creativity, politicians and academics should begin to reflect on the seventh state reform with the aim of increasing the transparency of the current Belgian institutional labyrinth.

Open access

László Trencsényi

Abstract

On the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, this essay analyses those educational innovations in the history of central European education that were introduced by the Church reform in the 16th century, following these modernizations and their further developments through the spreading of the universal school systems in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Drawing examples from the innovations in the college culture of the period, the author emphasises that those pedagogical values established in the 16th century are not only valid today, but are exemplary from the point of view of contemporary education. From these the author highlights: pupils’ autonomy (in the form of various communities), cooperation with the teachers and school management and the relative pluralism of values.

Open access

Laura Ervo

Abstract

In Finland, a government bill on plea bargaining is now at the parliament. In Estonia, Norway, Denmark, Germany and Latvia they have adopted similar systems already. In Sweden and Iceland plea bargaining is not possible. As a procedural instrument, plea bargaining is something quite new in Europe, and in the Baltic and in the Nordic countries. How does it fit into our systems and into our way of thinking? If we look at the current trends in criminal proceedings fairness, procedural justice, conflict resolution, negotiated law, pragmatically acceptable compromise, procedural truth, party autonomy, court service, communication and interaction are good examples of the topics which are currently being discussed. All these examples indicate that the criminal jurisdiction has become more communal. It has even been said that criminal proceedings have recently become closer civil proceedings, which seems to be quite true. Still, efficiency plays a major role in European adjudication thanks to economic crisis and lack of resources. How to understand the role of plea bargaining in this set? At least the legislator has pointed out the efficiency, the appropriate allocation of resources and the simplifying the criminal proceedings when suggesting adopting the plea bargaining in Finland. The novelty has not been put into philosophical context or into the systemic context of criminal proceedings. It looks like the legislator adopts some single instruments from the foreign legal orders if they seem to fit well into legislators’ puzzle to intensify the proceedings and to save the state money. However, there seem to be more coherent trends behind all of that as well - namely, the change of paradigm.

Open access

Zuzana Brinčíková, Marek Kálovec, Colin W. Lawson and Eva Muchová

Abstract

Fourteen Slovak state-owned enterprises were studied, using published data and structured interviews with management. A novel methodology is used to assess SOE autonomy, effectiveness, accountability and governance. Variations in operating conditions reflect different government objectives and different ownership models. Mixed state-private firms performed more like competitive firms than did wholly state-owned SOEs. This information was fed into an assessment of Slovak SOEs’ compliance with the 2015 OECD Guidelines on SOE Corporate Governance. There are many differences between Slovak practice and the Guidelines. This may reflect a choice to favour government interests, rather than the OECD’s inclusion of a wider group of stakeholders. One cost is foregone efficiency gains. Another is the perception that the present highly opaque governance system hides corruption.