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The Douro landscape heritage (NE Portugal): modernity and tradition in times of change

Abstract

As a consequence of its long history of more than 250 years, the Douro Demarcated Region (NE Portugal) boasts a distinct cultural landscape typified by terraces filled with the regional variety of grapevine – it is a region where famous wines are produced, in particular Port wine. Nevertheless, especially after the 1980s, the need to cover labour shortages and increase productivity led to a gradual change in the landscape, and today the traditional terraces are mixed with new types of vineyards, such as the “vinha ao alto” (vertical vines) and “vinha em patamares” (vines on terraces). Against this backdrop, and with a view to preserving the landscape in a sustainable and multifunctional way, UNESCO awarded the region the “Evolving Living Landscape, World Heritage” award. In this article we combine extensive documentary research with productive field work in order to question the relationship between the need to preserve an exceptional, cultural landscape and the need for regional sustainability in this World Heritage site.

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The Question of Responsibility: (De-)Peripheralising Rural Spaces in Post-Socialist Estonia

Rest. Discourse and power’, [in:] HALL, S. and GIEBEN, B. (eds.), Formations of Modernity , Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 275–332. Institut für Medien-und Kommunikationspolitik (IfM) (2015), ‘Länderporträt Estland’, http://www.mediadb.eu/europa/estland.html (24.10.2016). JÄGER, S. (1999), Kritische Diskursanalyse. Eine Einführung , Duisburg: DISS. JÕESALU, K. and KÕRESAAR, E. (2013, ‘Continuity or Discontinuity. On the Dynamics of Remembering ‘Mature Socialism’ in Estonian Post-Soviet Remembrance Culture’, Journal of Baltic Studies , 44 (2), pp

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Human Rights in Orthodoxy and Islam A Comparative Approach

Abstract

In a world where increasingly more voices from different geographical areas talk speak about equality between people, religions are called to uphold and preach human dignity and rights of all people, without taking account of race, sex or religion. In the interreligious dialog, the meetings between representatives of Christianity and Islam have multiplied considerably and they deal with themes analyzing preaching and defending human rights at all levels of life. From the preceding discussion it is clear that the human rights issue is quite sensitive, especially after the latest political, economic and social events that have shaken the world in which we live. After the period of time that the proclamation and recognition of global human rights were made as contained in the various international documents, it was passed into a new phase where the followers of different religions should work together for human dignity and human rights.

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The Counter-Hegemonic Virtues of Popular Culture in Eighteenth-Century England

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to re-examine popular culture in early-modern England by focusing on the oral/illiterate-written/literate and popular culture-high culture dyads. I aim to question why these interrelated socio-cultural categories have not been properly reconciled by the writers of the time. Moreover, my purpose is to focus on antiquarianism as a valid method whereby the delineation between the above-mentioned dichotomies turns into a subtle relationship in which both terms become complementary. I shall focus on two important antiquarian texts - Henry Bourne’s Antiquitates Vulgares (1725) and John Brand’s Observations on Popular Antiquities (1777) - by considering issues of religion and national identity, in an attempt to show that popular culture made known its counter-hegemonic virtues which, though permanently negotiated, were never rejected by the polite. Ultimately, the unstable relationship between the high and the low will be seen as suggestive of the porous boundaries between the two, indicating, at the same time, popular culture’s participatory role in rethinking cultural identity in Enlightenment England.

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Shadows Between the Signs

Abstract

The following experimental text is drawn from my most recent research project War Machines: Utopia and Allegorical Poetics in the Twenty-First Century. The project is an adaptation of the allegorical poetics developed by the French poet Charles Baudelaire in his scathing attacks on the sweeping transformation of Paris being conducted by Napoleon III’s right-hand man, Baron Haussmann. This small excerpt from my new book is a demonstration of my critical and poetical re-framing of Benjamin’s work that orients itself more towards the overlooked elements of Benjamin’s Marxism, as well as his “weak messianic” perspective, in order to re-assert a more radical orientation of his poetics and critical method with the utopian perspectives found in the work of that other great Marxist outlier of the twentieth century, Ernst Bloch, especially as outlined in his book, The Principle of Hope. Thus, unlike the postmodern appropriation of Baudelaire and Benjamin, I want to propose the possibility of bridging the gap between allegorical poetics, Marxism, and utopianism once again as a rigorous, critical option in the twenty-first century.

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Evaluation of the Level of Work Safety, Advancement and Efficiency of the Use of Machines and Devices on Labelling and Packaging Line and an Attempt to Compare the Results Using the Modified Mckinsey Matrix

Globalization and Its Socio-Economic Consequences, University of Zilina, Zilina, 425-432. Ingaldi, M., Dziuba, Sz. T., 2015. Modernity Evaluation of the Machines Used During Production Process of Metal Products , 24 th International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials, Tanger, Ostrava, 1908-1914. Knop, K., 2018. The Impact of Performance Improvement Achieved by the Closing Machine up to the Level of World-Class OEE on the Results of the Production Process , Materials Research Proceedings, Vol. 5, 117-122. Knop, K., Borkowski, S., 2009. Quality

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Authorial Self and Modernity as Reflected in Diaries and Memoirs. Three 19th-Century Hungarian Case Studies

Abstract

The role of the diaries and memoirs in the process of the conscious self-reflection and their contribution to the emergence of modern individual personalities are well-known facts of the intellectual history. The present paper intends to analyze a special form of the creation of modern individual character; it is the self-creation of the writer as a conscious personality, often with a clearly formulated opinion about her/his own social role. There will be offered several examples from the 19th-century history of the Hungarian intelligentsia. This period is more or less identical with the modernization of the “cultural industry” in Hungary, dominated by the periodicals with their deadlines, fixed lengths of the articles, and professional editing houses on the one hand and the cultural nation building on the other. Concerning the possible social and cultural role of the intelligentsia, it is the moment of the birth of a new type, so-called public intellectual. I will focus on three written sources, a diary of a Calvinist student of theology, Péter (Litkei) Tóth, the memoirs of an influential public intellectual, Gusztáv Szontagh, and a belletristic printed diary of a young intellectual, János Asbóth.

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Kosmopolitisk Identitet Eller Globalisert Fremmedgjøring

. Kjsrstad, Jan. 2006 [1993]. Forf0reren. Oslo: Aschehoug. Lash, Scott & Jonathan Friedman (eds.) 1996. Modernity and Identity. Oxford UK & Cambridge USA: Blackwell. Solstad, Dag. 2006 [2005]. Armand V. Oslo: Oktober forlag. Taylor, Charles. 1989. The Sources of the Self. The Making of the Modern Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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Considering the Linkage Between the Theory of Trust and Classical Rural Sociology’s Concepts

Academic references [1] Albanese, G. & Blasio, G. (2014). Who trusts others more? A cross-European study. Empirica 41(4), 803–820. DOI: 10.1007/s10663-013-9238-7. [2] Banfield, E. (1958). The moral basis of a backward society . New York: New York State University. [3] Barbalet, J. (1996). Social emotions: confidence, trust and loyalty. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 16(9–10), 75–96. DOI: 10.1108/eb013270. [4] Beck, U. (1992). Risk society: towards a new modernity. London: Sage. [5] Beck, U. (1999). World

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