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Ladislav Nagy

Abstract

This article deals with novels by Lawrence Norfolk which are read with a focus on their visual quality and the way they depict history. It is argued that Norfolk’s historical novels are unique in their portrayal of “landscapes of history”, large canvases in which individual characters play marginal, or a rather insignificant role. This approach distinguishes Norfolk from much of contemporary historical fiction, albeit at times this strategy might not be wholly satisfactory from a critical perspective. However, the article claims that Norfolk’s novels are intellectually inspiring since, similar to landscape, they invite a certain gaze, yet deny us the possibility of naming, of conceptualising. They provide readers with impressive vistas on history, which is seen as something too large to understand and penetrate. In this the novels are anti-humanistic. Individual characters (and their actions) are insignificant, or significant only to such an extent that they subscribe to some mythical framework, as Norfolk shows in, arguably, his best novel, In the Shape of a Boar (2000).

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Emily Horton

Abstract

In the context of twenty-first century global conservatism, where anti-immigrant sentiment is everywhere apparent, the importance of Ishiguro’s writing arguably lies in its on-going challenge to this perspective’s faulty logic and its capacity to reveal the radical violence behind nationalist political attacks on minority and immigrant populations. In this article I explore this challenge explicitly through a politically-oriented reading of The Remains of the Day (1989), highlighting this novel’s joint critique of Thatcherite nationalism and late twentieth century global entrepreneurialism. While this focus obviously represents a response to an earlier socio-political moment, defined by its own unique amalgam of ideological anxieties, nevertheless what emerges most prominently through this reading is the novel’s topical condemnation of cultural essentialism and its attendant hierarchies, concerns which remain of utmost critical significance within the twenty-first century. Thus, by making this assessment explicit, highlighting British conservatism’s devastating psychological and material implications for affected individuals, ranging from repressed and traumatised psychologies to radical economic precarity, this novel can be seen to register Thatcherite prejudice in a poignantly relevant manner. Indeed, the pseudo-respect granted to the ‘genuine old-fashioned English butler’ in this novel might also be seen as comparable to Trump’s pseudo-populism or Brexit nostalgia, both of which likewise ignore the pressing reality of imperialism’s historical violence.

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Jennifer Henke

Abstract

This article discusses the role of the body in Alex Garland’s film Ex Machina (2015). It focuses on Ava’s female cyborg body against the backdrop of both classic post-humanist theories and current reflections from scholars in the field of body studies. I argue that Ex Machina addresses but also transcends questions of gender and feminism. It stresses the importance of the body for social interaction both in the virtual as well as the real world. Ava’s lack of humanity results from her mind that is derived from the digital network Blue Book in which disembodied communication dominates. Moreover, the particular construction of Nathan’s progeny demonstrates his longing for a docile sex toy since he created Ava with fully functional genitals but without morals. Ex Machina further exhibits various network metaphors both on the visual and the audio level that contribute to the (re)acknowledgement that we need a body in order to be human.

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Amir Mirhaghi, Hossein Karimi Moonaghi, Simin Sharafi and Amir Emami Zeydi

35. Hauck FR, Zyzanski SJ, Alemagno SA, Medalie JH. Patient perceptions of humanism in physicians: effects on positive health behaviors. Family Med. 1989; 22:447-52. 36. Passi V, Doug M, Peile E, Thistlethwaite J, Johnson N. Developing medical professionalism in future doctors: a systematic review. Int J Med Educ. 2010; 1:19-29. http://dx.doi.org/10.5116/ijme.4bda.ca2a 37. Coulehan J. Viewpoint: Today's Professionalism: Engaging the Mind but Not the Heart. Acad Med. 2005;80:892-8. http://dx.doi.org/10

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Roman Krul’

bases of christian humanism]. Lublin (in Polish). 10. Gudrun, Europa dla Chrystusa!, Wiedeń. (2012). Retireved 13.02.2014 from: http://www.europe4christ.net/fileadmin/media/pdf/polish/List_do_Europy_6.pdf.28012012 (in Polish). 11. Kwaśnica, R. (2004). Wprowadzenie do myślenia o nauczycielu [Introduction to the reflections about a teacher]. In: Kwieciński, Z., Śliwerski, B. (red.). Pedagogika T 2. Podręcznik akademicki [Pedagogy V.2. Academic textbook]. Warszawa, s. 291 (in Polish). 12. Kwiatkowska, H. (1997). Źródła

Open access

Hans Klein

Abstract

The historical-critical method of biblical exegesis has its roots in Humanism and in the Enlightenment. Humanism situated the Bible in the series of ancient texts, whilst the Enlightenment sought the rational elements in the message of the Bible. The method, developed over a long period of time, proceeds from the assumption that the Bible has a message, first and foremost, for the respective era. This is why it tries to distil the demands and consolations of the Bible on the basis of (historical) knowledge about the respective era, and to sound the depths of its message for the present on this basis. There are many steps the interpreter must go through to create a space in his heart for the message of the Bible in accord with the specifics of his own era. The critical aspect of the method rests primarily on placing the message within the time of its utterance, but also on relating it to the conditions and mentalities prevailing at the time of interpretation. The historical-critical method is an auxiliary science that does not exclude other types of Bible exegesis. The insights gained from applying it are communicated through sermons and as part of the teachings of the Church.

Open access

Zbigniew Dziubiński

Tourism through the Eyes of the Holy See

The Vatican's vision of tourism is based on Christian humanism, integral humanism and personalism. At the very core of the vision are human beings, who are not only the creators of tourism but also its ultimate goal, and for this reason all values of the natural world should be unconditionally subordinated to the good that are people. Consequently, the fundamental goal of tourism is to satisfy the needs of exploration, relaxation, entertainment and, first and foremost, the spiritual and intellectual needs of every person. Tourism has to help build a sense of community. It should also contribute to the elimination of poverty and foster the sense of responsibility for the environment. Tourism must not be exclusive to the rich and it should never be a time of depravity, promiscuity and, consequently, the degradation of people. Tourism should become an opportunity for all people to discover their contemplative dimension, giving them a chance to see God in nature and first of all, in other people.

Open access

Ali Arian

Abstract

It seems that the very important role of literature is its transcendental appeal. Literature knows no boundary and it ties whole nations even if they are politically segregated. The present paper tries to trace some of the salient features of humanism and Sufism, such as Absolute Unity, simplicity, selfknowing, purity, solitude, loving one another and some others in Henry David Thoreau’s Walden. This American writer, as an ardent follower of the Transcendental Club in America and the holy scriptures of the East, was known as the hero of simplicity in the U.S.A. Being a protester against government and society, he dwelled for more than two years alone in Walden Pond to see the mysteries of life and to find Reality and the Almighty. He believed Nature to be the best teacher and opined that every parcel of nature is a sign of God. He came to know about the holy scriptures of the East, especially those of the Indians and strongly used them in his writings, especially in Walden and the Week. Therefore such a person who seeks God, indeed, can be familiar with elements of humanism and Sufism, and one can find such elements in Walden by pondering its text

Open access

Andra Maria Brezniceanu

Abstract

The unaccompanied or separated minor is, according to the European Union body of legislation regarding asylum and migration, one of the extremely vulnerable categories of persons, and the risk of vulnerability is amplified in the case of the unaccompanied or separated minor - asylum seeker. Ever since the EU pre-accession period Romanian legislation reconciled, according to the European model, the requirements of the rules on migration with humanism provisions in the field of child rights. The images in the media about the migratory flows in recent years have revealed a system that requires imperatively legislative changes, adapting procedures, innovative work tools, including the case of the unaccompanied minor asylum seeker. In this article I intend to analyze the existing legislative framework in Romania, highlighting the positive aspects of the law and those which I believe that should be reconsidered so that the interests of the minor in the asylum procedure to be properly protected.

Open access

Joseph J. Hyde and Walter E. Block

Abstract

What is the source of the antipathy of Catholic intellectuals toward free markets? That is the issue addressed in the present paper. We see the antecedents of this viewpoint of theirs in terms of secular humanism, Marxism and mistaken views of morality and economics. One of the explanations for this phenomenon are the teachings of St Augustine. He greatly distrusted the City of Man, seeing it as anarchic and chaotic. In contrast, his City of God is more orderly, but far removed from the hurly burly of free enterprise. Another source of the rejection of capitalism on the part of Catholic intellectuals is liberation theology, which is Marxism minus the atheism of that doctrine. Both economic and cultural Marxism have played a role in the alienation of such intellectuals from the tenets of laissez faire capitalism. Are there any counter currents? Yes, the School of Salamanca, which has been all but forgotten in this community.