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Influence of Non-Oxidised and Oxidised Rapeseed Oil Consumption on Liver Metabolism Pathways and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis Development in Rabbits

References 1. Bandsma R.H., Wiegman C.H., Herling A.W., Burger H.J., ter Harmsel A., Meijer A.J., Romjin J.A., Reijngoud D.J., Kuipers F.: Acute inhibition of glucose- 6-phoshpate translocator acitvity leads to increase de novo lipogenesis and development of hepatic steatosis without VLDL production in rats. Diabetes 2001, 50, 2591-2597. 2. Champe P.C., Harvey R.A.: Biochemistry, Philadelphia, USA, 1994. 3. Choe E., Min D.B.: Chemistry of deep-fat frying oils. J Food Sci 2007, 72 77

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Adipokines, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, and necroinflammation in patients with chronic viral hepatitis

Ther. 2005; 22(Suppl 2):24-7. 4. Lonardo A, Adinolfi LE, Loria P, Carulli N, Ruggiero G, Day CP. Steatosis and hepatitis C virus: mechanisms and significance for hepatic and extrahepatic disease. Gastroenterology. 2004; 126:586-97. 5. Clouston AD, Jonsson JR, Powell EE. Steatosis as a cofactor in other liver diseases: hepatitis C virus, alcohol, hemochromatosis, and others. Clin Liver Dis. 2007; 11:173-89. 6. Yokoyama H, Hirose H, Ohgo H, Saito I. Inverse association between serum adiponectin level and transaminase

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Hepatic fibrosis, measured by fibroscan in a group of patients with obesity

Abstract

Introduction.Hepatic steatosis is a reversible condition caused by accumulation of triglycerides in liver cells. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can progress to advanced liver disease: fibrosis, cirrhosis, liver failure, cancer, and finally can lead to death; therefore NAFLD contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of hepatic cause. Materials and methods: The study was conducted on a group of 88 patients with Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 30kg/m², they were excluded patients with known diabetes. Results, Discussion: The statistical analysis showed that in more than half of subjects elastometry values were higher than those considered normal, obesity is a risk factor for NAFLD that progresses in hepatic fibrosis. Conclusions: Liver fibrosis is present in high percentage in patients with obesity (52% of subjects) and it was positively correlated with age, arterial stiffness and fasting glucose.

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Physical activity as a protective factor against development of liver steatosis in patients infected with hepatitis C

References 1. Adinolfi L.E., Gambardella M., Andreana A., Tripo­di M.F., Utili R., Ruggiero G. (2001) Steatosis acceler­ates the progression of liver damage of chronic hepati­tis C patients and correlates with specific HCV genotype and visceral obesity. Hepatol. , 33(6): 1358-1364. DOI: 10.1053/jhep.2001.24432. 2. Blair S.N., Kampert J.B., Kohl H.W., Barlow C.E., Macera C.A., Paffenbarger R.S., Gibbons L.W. (1996) Influences of cardiorespiratory fitness and other precur­sors on cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in

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Polyphenols treatment in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Introduction In the last few decades, the term nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been evoked increasingly in research frameworks and in clinical practice. It defines the presence of significant fat accumulation in the liver (> 5% of hepatocytes), in the absence of alcohol abuse and any other cause of liver diseases.[ 1 ] The term NAFLD includes different clinical entities, and in particular, the fat accumulation in liver, also known as simple fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); it is characterized by steatosis along with

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The Severity of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver in Type II Diabetes

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that affects up to one third of the adult population of industrialized countries. The pathophysiological spectrum includes the following entities that are clinically and histologically distinct: hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis; their subsequent evolution can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.The increase of the prevalence of NAFLD during the last decade is caused by the epidemiological and pathophysiological association with type II diabetes and obesity, NAFLD being present in about 70-80% of patients with type II diabetes mellitus. It has long been thought that the relationship between type II diabetes mellitus and NAFLD is unidirectional, fatty liver being secondary to insulin resistance and type II diabetes mellitus, but recent studies show that hepatic steatosis may precede insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, thus demonstrating abidirectional causal relationship between these two disorders. Weight loss through diet andexercise is effective in preventing and treating NAFLD in diabetic patients; also, drugs that causeweight loss need to be evaluated. Both anti-diabetic medication and statins play an important vrole in the prevention and treatment of NAFLD.

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Pharmacokinetics of Doxycycline in Ducks with Steatosis due to Force-feeding

-Maximilians-Universitet, München, Germany, 9. Bernard, P.G., Bengone, T, Prehn, D., Durand, S., Labie, C., Benard, P. (2006). Physiology of ducks during force-feeding: study of hepatic steatosis. Bulletin de l‘Academie Vétérinaire de France 159, 43–54. 10. Bogin, E., Avidar, Y., Merom, M., Israeli, B., Malkinson, M., Sobak, S., Kudler, Y. (1984). Biochemical changes associated whit fatty liver in geese. Avian Pathol. 13, 683-901. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079458408418566 PMid:18766879 11. Awde, S., Marty-Gasset, N., Wilkesman, J., Remingnon, H. (2013). Proteolytic activity

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A Comparative Analysis of Serum Lipids in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Healthy Controls

REFERENCES 1. Lonardo A, Adinolfi LE, Loria P et al. Steatosis and hepatitis C virus: Mechanisms and significance for hepatic and extrahepatic disease. – Gastroenterology 2004, 126, 586-597. 2. Loria P, Marchesini G, Nascimbeni F et al. Cardiovascular risk, lipidemic phenotype and steatosis. A comparative analysis of cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic liver disease due to varying etiology. – Atherosclerosis. 232, 2014, 1, 99-109. 3. Adinolfi LE, Rinaldi L, Guerrera B et al. NAFLD and NASH in HCV Infection: Prevalence and Significance in Hepatic and

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The Prevalence of Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke and Selected Co-Morbidities in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Population - Based on Cohort Study of Outpatients

Abstract

The prospective study analyses prevalence of coronary heart disease, stroke, elevated serum levels of ALT and GGT and prevalence of cancer diseases in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus, and usage of this epidemiological data in everyday clinical practice. Outpatients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus were monitoring during the period of August 2007 - August 2011. The patients with previously treated type 2 diabetes mellitus were eliminated from the monitoring. The population consists of 117 males and 83 females aged 30 to 92 years sent by GPs and various specialists.

The relatively low prevalence of known coronary artery disease was recorded in men (34%) and in women (19%). Prevalence of stroke history was confirmed in 12% of men and 7% of women. The elevated serum ALT levels > 0.55 μkat/l was recorded in 45% of men and 45% of women and elevated serum GGT levels > 0.45 μkat/l was recorded in 81% of men and 68% of women. Prevalence of cancer diseases was recorded 5% in women and 5.26% of men. In the studied group of patients there was recorded the occurrence of colon cancer in men over 64 years old and the occurrence of breast cancer, endometrial cancer and colon cancer in women over 62 years old.

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Subpopulation Discovery in Epidemiological Data with Subspace Clustering

, U. Niemann, B. Preim, and M. Spiliopoulou, “Can we Distinguish Between Benign and Malignant Breast Tumors in DCE-MRI by Studying a Tumor's Most Suspect Region Only?,” in 26th International Symposium on Computer- Based Medical Systems (CBMS), pp. 77-82, 2013. [10] U. Niemann, H. Völzke, J.-P. Kühn, and M. Spiliopoulou, “Learning and inspecting classification rules from longitudinal epidemiological data to identify predictive features on hepatic steatosis,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 41, pp. 5405-5415, September 2014. [11

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