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The construction of cooperative and inferential meaning by children with Asperger syndrome

References Ackerman, B.P., 1981. When is a question not answered? The understanding of young children of utterances violating or conforming to the rule of conversational sequencing. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology , vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 487-507. American Psychiatric Association, 2014. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , 5th edition. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association. Attardo, S., 1993. Violation of conversational maxims and cooperation: the case of jokes. Journal of Pragmatics , vol. 19, no. 6, pp

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The ‘indisciplinarity’ of stylistics

Abstract

This paper aims at showing why the stylistician can be construed as a prolific “impostor” in a most positive sense: pledged to no specific linguistic prophet, she can opt for different theoretical linguistic tools (in the sphere of pragmatics, critical discourse analysis, cognitive grammar, etc.) depending on her object of study and what her research question is. The liberty claimed by the stylistician explains why stylistics is the “undisciplined” child of linguistics, shirking any clear definition of its boundaries. It will be argued that stylistics can only exist as a cross-disciplinary field given its conception of language as fundamentally contextualized. If it was a discipline determined by clear-cut pre-established boundaries, stylistics would be far more “disciplined” but would run the risk of serving only itself. The broad goal of this paper is thus to evince that the “indisciplinarity” of stylistics constitutes its very defining essence. With this aim in mind, it will demonstrate what stylistics owes to other disciplines, what it shares with similar language-based disciplines and what it can offer to other fields or practices of knowledge.

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Selling Their Research: The Linguistic Realization of Rhetoric Moves in English Thesis Abstracts Written by Hungarian Undergraduates

psycholinguistic perspectives . Zs. Lengyel and J. Navracsics (Eds.). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, pp. 117-129. Doró, Katalin. 2008. The written assessment of the vocabulary knowledge and use of English majors in Hungary . University of Szeged. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Harwood, Nigel. 2005. “‘Nowhere has anyone attempted ... In this article I aim to do just that’: A corpus-based study of self-promotional I and we in academic writing across four disciplines.” Journal of Pragmatics 37(8): 1207-1231. Hirano, Eliana

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Hedging in Political Discourse: Evidence from the Speeches of King Abdullah II of Jordan

Abstract

This paper reports on the findings of a study that aimed to identify the linguistic items which act as hedges in the speeches of King Abdullah II of Jordan, as well as to examine the pragmatic functions of these devices. Twenty-five political speeches of King Abdullah II, randomly selected from the official website of King Abdullah (see Appendix), were analyzed adopting Salager-Meyer’s (1994) taxonomy. The study revealed that the most frequently used hedging device in King Abdullah’s speech is modal auxiliaries, and the most frequently used hedging device subcategory is the modal auxiliary “can”. The findings suggest that these hedging devices fulfil several pragmatic functions. These findings contribute to understanding that speaking a second language (Arabic, in the case of King Abdullah II) neither affects the types of hedging devices nor the functions these devices perform. Moreover, contrary to scientific discourse (e.g., medicine), the research concludes that political discourse as a non-scientific genre resorts to hedging devices to express indirectness, politeness, lack of commitment and probability.

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Annotating the ICE corpora pragmatically – preliminary issues & steps

References Aijmer, Karin. 2002. English discourse particles: Evidence from a corpus. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Aijmer, Karin and Christoph Rühlemann (eds.). 2015. Corpus pragmatics: A handbook. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Australian National Corpus. n.d. Accessible at https://www.ausnc.org.au/. Biber, Douglas, Stig Johansson, Geoffrey Leech, Susan Conrad and Edward Finegan. 1999. Longman grammar of spoken and written English. London: Longman. Fischer

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Categorizing expressive speech acts in the pragmatically annotated SPICE Ireland corpus

: A focus on language in action. In K. P. Schneider and A. Barron (eds.). The pragmatics of Irish English, 2-15. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. Brown, Penelope and Stephen C. Levinson. 1987. Politeness: Some universals in language usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Clark, Herbert. 1996. Using language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Crystal, David. 2006. Words, words, words. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Farr, Fiona and Bróna Murphy. 2009. Religious references in contemporary Irish

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