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Analytical Procedure for the Determination of Tulathromycin in Swine Plasma

References 1. Anon. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), Center for Veterinary Medicine: Guidance for Industry, Bioanalytical Method Validation, 2001. 2. Anon. European Medicines Agency (EMEA): Guideline on bioanalytical method validation, 2011. 3. Benchaoui H.A., Nowakowski M., Sherington J., Rowan T.G., Sunderland S.J.: Pharmacokinetics and lung tissue concentrations of tulathromycin in swine. J Vet Pharmacol

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Determination of Free Doxycycline Concentrations in the Plasma and Milk of Sheep and in the Plasma of Rabbits by Using the HPLC Method

REFERENCES 1. Chopra, I., Roberts, M. (2001). Tetracycline antibiotics: Mode of action, applications, molecular biology, and epidemiology of bacterial resistance. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 65 (2): 232-260. https://doi.org/10.1128/MMBR.65.2.232-260.2001 PMid:11381101 PMCid:PMC99026 2. Valentín, S., Morales, A., Sánchez, J.L., Rivera, A. (2009). Safety and efficacy of doxycycline in the treatment of rosacea. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2, 129-140. PMid:21436975 PMCid:PMC3047926 3. Agwuh, K. N., MacGowan, A. (2006). Pharmacokinetics and

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Nanobiotechnology Medical Applications: Overcoming Challenges Through Innovation

Abstract

Biomedical Nanotechnology (BNT) has rapidly become a revolutionary force that is driving innovation in the medical field. BNT is a subclass of nanotechnology (NT), and often operates in cohort with other subclasses, such as mechanical or electrical NT for the development of diagnostic assays, therapeutic implants, nano-scale imaging systems, and medical machinery. BNT is generating solutions to many conventional challenges through the development of enhanced therapeutic delivery systems, diagnostic techniques, and theranostic therapies. Therapeutically, BNT has generated many novel nanocarriers (NCs) that each express specifically designed physiochemical properties that optimize their desired pharmacokinetic profile. NCs are also being integrated into nanoscale platforms that further enhance their delivery by controlling and prolonging their release profile. Nano-platforms are also proving to be highly efficient in tissue regeneration when combined with the appropriate growth factors. Regarding diagnostics, NCs are being designed to perform targeted delivery of luminescent tags and contrast agents that enhance the NC -aided imaging capabilities and resulting diagnostic accuracy of the presence of diseased cells. This technology has also been advancing the ability for surgeons to practice true precision surgical techniques. Incorporating therapeutic and diagnostic NC-components within a single NC can facilitate both functions, referred to as theranostics, which facilitates real-time in vivo tracking and observation of drug release events via enhanced imaging. Additionally, stimuli-responsive theranostic NCs are quickly developing as vectors for tumor ablation therapies by providing a model that facilitates the location of cancer cells for the application of an external stimulus. Overall, BNT is an interdisciplinary approach towards health care, and has the potential to significantly improve the quality of life for humanity by significantly decreasing the treatment burden for patients, and by providing non-invasive therapeutics that confer enhanced therapeutic efficiency and safety

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Vildagliptin in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

References 1. Nauck MA, Homberger E, Siegel EG et al. Incretin effects of increasing glucose loads in man calculated from venous insulin and C-peptide responses. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 63: 492-498, 1986. 2. Nauck MA, Stöckmann F, Ebert R, Creutzfeldt W. Reduced incretin effect in type 2 (noninsulin- dependent) diabetes. Diabetologia 29: 46-52, 1986. 3. Vildagliptin - summary of product characteristics, 2012. 4. He Y-L. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of

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LC-MS/MS analysis of doxycycline residues in chicken tissues after oral administration

1998, 708, 145-152. 9. Dorrestein G.M., Bruijne J.J.D., Vulto A.: Bioavailability of doxycycline injectable in pigeons. Acta Vet Scand Suppl 1991, 87, 291-292. 10. El-Gendi A.Y.I., Atef M., Amer A.M.M., Kamel G.M.: Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of doxycycline in broiler chickens pretreated with either: Diclazuril or halofuginone. Food Chem Toxicology 2010, 48, 3209-3214. 11. EMEA Summary Report Doxycycline (2), European Medicines Agency Veterinary Medicines and Inspections, Committee for Veterinary Medicinal

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Effect of doxycycline concentrations in chicken tissues as a consequence of permanent exposure to enrofloxacin traces in drinking water

1982, 4, 115–135. 10. De Ruyck H., De Ridder H., Van Renterghem R., Van Wambeke F.: Validation of HPLC method of analysis of tetracycline residues in eggs and broiler meat and its application to a feeding trial. Food Addit Contam Part A 1999, 16, 47–56. 11. El-Gendi A.Y., Atef M., Amer A.M., Kamel G.M.: Pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution of doxycycline in broiler chickens pretreated with either: diclazuril or halofuginon. Food Chem Toxicol 2010, 48, 3209–3214. 12. Ershov E., Bellaiche M., Hanji V., Soback S., Gips M., Shlosberg A.: Interaction

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The effects of flubendazole and its metabolites on the larval development of Haemonchus contortus (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae): an in vitro study

pharmacokinetics. Acta Tropica, 86: 141–159 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0001-706X(03)00031-7 [5] Dobson, R. J., Griffiths, D. A., Donald, A. D., Waller, P. J. (1987): A genetic model describing the evolution of levamisole resistance in Trichostrongylus colubriformis, a nematode parasite of sheep. IMA J. Appl. Math., 4: 279–293 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/imammb/4.4.279 [6] Hubert, J., Kerboeuf, D. (1992): A microlarval development assay for the detection of anthelmintic resistance in sheep nematodes. Vet. Rec., 130: 442–446 http

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Effect of Storage on Residue Levels of Enrofloxacin in Muscle of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

partition coefficients of feed contaminants. Book of Abstracts. 2 nd Feed for Health Conference, p. 48. Tromso, Norway 4. Liang, J., Li, J., Zhao, F., Liu, P., Chang, Z. (2012). Pharmacokinetics and tissue behavior of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in turbot Scophthalmus maximus at two water temperatures. Chinese J. Oceanol. Limnol. 30, 644-653. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00343-012-1228-2 5. Alfredsson, G., Ohlsson, A. (1998). Stability of sulphonamide drugs in meat during storage. Food Addit. Contam. 15, 302-306. http://dx.doi.org/10

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The effect of herbal materials on the p-glycoprotein activity and function

Pharmacol Exp Ther 2000; 294:88-95. 24. Bilia AR, Gallori S, Vincieri FF. St. John’s wort and depression: efficacy, safety and tolerability - an update. Life Sci 2002; 70:3077-96. 25. Calapai G, Crupi A, Firenzuoli F et al. Serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine involvement in the antidepressant action of Hypericum perforatum. Pharmacopsych 2001; 34:45-9. 26. Wang Z, Hamman MA, Huang SM, Lesko LJ, Hall SD. Effect of St John‘s wort on the pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine. Clin Pharmacol Ther 2002; 71

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Effect of camellia sinensis extract on the expression level of transcription factors and cytochrome p450 genes coding phase i drug-metabolizing enzymes

. Pharmacokinetics of tea catechins after ingestion of green tea and (-)- epigallocatechin-3 gallate by humans: formation of different metabolites and individual variability. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2002; 11:1025-1032. 19. Bu-Abbas A, Clifford MN, Walker R, Ioannides C. Selective induction of rat hepatic CYP1 proteins and of peroxisomal proliferation by green tea. Carcinogenesis 1994; 15:2575-2579. 20. Maliakal PP, Coville PF, Wanwimolruk S. Tea consumption modulates hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes in Wistar rats. J Pharm Pharmacol 2001

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