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Short communications. eLearning in EFL: Problems and Solutions

Short communications. eLearning in EFL: Problems and Solutions

This paper investigates certain problems encountered when technology-based instruction is employed in teaching English as a foreign language. Three EFL specialists from Saudi Arabia are interviewed and their insights on solving those problems are presented. Many academics feel ill-equipped to utilize new technologies in teaching because they are technophobes who fear or dislike technology or do not have sufficient experience in employing computer applications. Other academics found technology-based teaching time-consuming, leading to increased workload, and demanding high levels of technical support. Solutions to face the reluctance to engage in electronic forms of teaching include the provision of instructional support to provide faculty with the necessary technical skills, changing college policies to consider teaching with technology an activity for which faculty receive credit, improving the reward system to motivate faculty to better productivity and higher performance, and addressing critical work-related issues, such as workload.

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The effects of explicit pronunciation instruction on the degree of perceived foreign accent in the speech of EFL learners

and K. LeVelle (eds.), Proceedings of the Second Annual Conference on Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching , 144-152. Ames: Iowa State University Saito, K. 2007. The Influence of Explicit Phonetic Instruction on Pronunciation in EFL Settings: the Case of English Vowels and Japanese Learners of English. Linguistics Journal 3.16-40. Saito, K. 2011. Examining the Role of Explicit Phonetic Instruction in Native-Like and Comprehensible Pronunciation Development: an Instructed SLA Approach to L2 Phonology. Language Awareness 20. 45

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Teachers’ Response to Serbian EFL Learners’ Pronunciation Errors

Abstract

The present paper aims at discovering what type of feedback Serbian teachers resort to when correcting their students’ mispronounced words or utterances. To accomplish the previously stated aim of the study, we conducted a survey investigating teachers’ preferences for specific types of corrective feedback and the results indicate that the most frequently employed type of feedback among Serbian EFL teachers is recast, whereas the least preferred one is direct or explicit correction. The total of 55 teachers from primary, secondary schools and colleges participated in the survey.

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The relationship between language learning motivation and foreign language achievement as mediated by perfectionism: the case of high school EFL learners

., & Daana, H. (2013). Jordanian undergraduates’ motivations and attitudes towards learning English in EFL context. International Review of Social Sciences and Humanities, 4 (2), 159-180. Vaezi, Z. (2008). Language learning motivation among Iranian undergraduate students. World Applied Sciences Journal, 5 (1), 54-61. Zusho, A., Anthony, J. S., Hashimoto, N., & Robertson, G. (2014). Do video games provide motivation to learn? In F. C. Blumberg (Ed.), Learning by playing: Video gaming in education (pp. 69-86). NY: Oxford University Press.

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The effect of incidental learning on the comprehension of English affixes by Arabic-speaking EFL learners: acquisition and application

References Altakhaineh, Abdel Rahman and Hanan Rahrouh. 2015. The Use of Euphemistic Expressions by Arab EFL Learners: Evidence from Al Ain University of Science and Technology. International Journal of English Linguistics 5(1). 14-21. Altakhaineh, Abdel Rahman and Aseel Zibin. 2014. Perception of Culturally Loaded Words by Arab EFL Learners. International Journal of Linguistics 6(3). 1-22. Altakhaineh, Abdel Rahman. 2014. The Interaction between Inflection and Derivation in English and MSA . Germany: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing

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EFL teacher professional change in India

Abstract

This article examines teacher professional change and compares two 10th standard English as a Foreign Language teachers employed in a Marathi-medium secondary school in Pune (India) at different stages in their careers. Wenger’s (1998) three interconnected Community of Practice dimensions (i.e. mutual engagement, joint enterprise and shared repertoire) highlight pertinent facets of the teachers’ professional lives as viewed from the sociocultural perspective (Vygotsky, 1978). Case study methodology was utilized within a qualitative, ethnographic research paradigm. The aim is to uncover how the two EFL teachers engage in their professional community of practice and their career trajectories. Firstly, the data analysis indicates that periphery member status is established through active engagement in the professional community which creates trajectories along which novices may travel. Secondly, the accessing and sharing of information, ideas and experiences is beneficial for all members as it strengthens professional relationships and reconfirms already existing members’ central position. Lastly, active engagement in a professional community of practice offers a means of potential growth for novice teachers and central members. Access to communal resources such as new knowledge, stories and artifacts is acquired and aids in establishing novices’ competency.

Open access
Identifying Motivational Factors of Pre-service EFL Teachers

Abstract

For over sixty years what motivates individuals to become teachers and how they perceive teaching as a career have been investigated through a growing body of research. The underlying reasons for the research are mostly the problems of teacher shortages and teacher quality. To maintain informed and intelligent generations, teacher quality and teaching cover an important ground in the development of many countries all around the world. The issue of teacher shortages and teacher quality not only differs from one country to another but also from one field to another. In this regard, English language teaching (ELT) is one of the fields that experience teacher shortage and teacher quality issues in Turkey than other teaching fields. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the motivations of pre-service EFL teachers for choosing ‘teaching as a profession and their perceptions about teaching career’. A total of 210 preservice EFL (English as a Foreign Language) teachers voluntarily participated in the study. The data was gathered by utilizing a motivation scale. The results revealed that prior experiences as a learner, social utility values were the most significant motivation factors for teacher trainees. The findings were discussed in relation to language teacher education.

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Comparative exploration of learning styles and teaching techniques between Thai and Vietnamese EFL students and instructors

References Akkakoson, S. (2011). Learning and teaching style preferences in EFL. Journal of the Worldwide Forum on Education and Culture, ) 3 1(, 66-78. Alkhasaweh, I. M., Mrayyan, M. T., Docherty, C, Alashram, S., & Yosef, H. (2008). Problem-based learning (PBL): Assessing students’ learning preferences using VARK. Nurse Education Today , 28, 572-579. Barbe, W. B. & Milone, M. N. (1981). What We Know About Modality Strengths. Educational Leadership, 70 (1), 378-380. Bastable, S. B. (2008). Nurse as educator: Principles of teaching

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The assessment of Bosnian EFL learners’ knowledge by two different measures: test and writing assignment

to correct their most serious and frequent errors? CATESOL Journal 8.1: 41–62. Gatbonton, Elizabeth, Norman Segalowitz (2005). Rethinking communicative language teaching: A focus on access to fluency. Canadian Modern Language Review 16.3: 325–353. Habibić, Ajša, Vildana Dubravac (forthcoming). Grammar acquisition in Bosnian EFL context. Pismo . Han, Youngju, Rod Ellis (1998) Implicit knowledge, explicit knowledge and general language proficiency. Language Teaching Research 2: 1–23. Housen, Alex, Folkert Kuiken (2009). Complexity

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in ExELL
Integrating soft skills in higher education and the EFL classroom: Knowledge beyond language learning

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of soft skills in the context of higher education and in the context of the foreign language learning classroom. The article aims to define the notion of soft skills and to offer possible ways of grouping soft skills. It also provides ways of including soft skills instruction in the context of higher education. In addition, the article aims to propose models of implementing soft skills in foreign language learning and teaching situations and to suggest teaching procedures and activities which will facilitate the introduction of soft skills in the EFL (English as a foreign language) classroom at South East European University. The article also aims to discuss the need of including soft skills in undergraduate studies curricula and to provide arguments in favour of including soft skills. The article will also present participants’ views and perceptions, collected via survey, of the importance and necessity of soft skills for their future careers and workplaces. The conclusion will offer some practical suggestions regarding soft skill inclusion in the EFL classroom.

Open access