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Cognate arguments and the Transitivity Requirement in the history of English

arvard Classics 49). N ew York: P .F. Collier & Son. Höche, Silke. 2009. Cognate object constructions in English. A cognitive-linguistic account. T übingen: N arr. Horrocks, G eoffrey & Stavrou, Melita. 2003. A ctions and their results in G reek and E nglish: T he complementarity of morphologically encoded (viewpoint) aspect and syntactic resultative predication. Journal of Semantics 20. 297−327. Horrocks, G eoffrey & Stavrou, Melita. 2007. G rammaticalized A spect and Spatio-temporal Culmination. Lingua 117. 605

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The Boundaries of Language: Dealing with Paralinguistic Features

Linguistics , 136-144. HIRST Daniel, DI CRISTO Albert, ESPESSER Robert 2000. “Levels of Representation and Levels of Analysis for Intonation.” In: HORNE 2000. HORNE Merle (ed.). 2000. Prosody: Theory and Experiment . Dordrecht: Kluwer. HUGGINS A.W.F. 1979. “Some Effects on Intelligibility of Inappropriate Temporal Relations within Speech Units.” In: Proceedings of the 9th ICPhS , vol. II, 275-282. HYMES Dell. 1974. Foundations of Sociolinguistics: An Ethnographic Approach . Philadelphia: University of

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Timespace for Emotions: Anachronism in Flaubert, Bal/Williams Gamaker, Munch and Knausgård

. Knausgård, Karl Ove, and James Wood. “Writing My Struggle : An Exchange.” Theparisreview.org. The Paris Review 211 (Winter 2014). Web. 13 May 2017. Moxey, Keith P. Visual Time: The Image in History. Durham: Duke UP, 2013. Print. Rosa, Hartmut. Social Acceleration: A New Theory of Modernity. Trans. Jonathan Trejo-Mathys. New York: Columbia UP, 2013. Print. Ross, Christine. The Past is the Present; It’s the Future Too. The Temporal Turn in Contemporary Art. New York: Continuum, 2014. Print. Schmitt, Arnaud, and Stefan Kjerkegaard. “Karl Ove

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Gothic Matters of De-Composition: The Pastoral Dead in Contemporary American Fiction

Abstract

In Alice Walker’s vignette “The Flowers,” a young black girl’s walk in the woods is interrupted when she treads “smack” into the skull of a lynched man. As her name predicates, Myop’s age and innocence obstruct her from seeing deeply into the full implications of the scene, while the more worldly reader is jarred and confronted with a whole history of racial violence and slavery. The skeleton, its teeth cracked and broken, is a temporal irruption, a Gothic “smack” that shatters the transience of the pastoral scene with the intrusion of a deeper past from which dead matter/material de-composes (disturbs, unsettles, undoes) the story’s present with the violent matter/issue of racism. Walker’s story is representative of an important trope in fiction, where the pastoral dead speak through the details of their remains, and the temporal fabric of text is disrupted by the very substance of death.

Against the backdrops of Terry Gifford’s post-pastoral and Fred Botting’s Gothic understanding of the literary corpse as “negative[ly] sublime,” this essay explores the fictional dead as matter unfettered by genre, consistently signifying beyond their own inanimate silences, revealing suppressed and unpalatable themes of racial and sexual violence, child abuse and cannibalistic consumerism. Along with Walker’s story, this study considers these ideas through new readings of Stephen King’s novella The Body, Raymond Carver’s story “So Much Water So Close to Home,” and The Road by Cormac McCarthy. While these writers may form an unlikely grouping in terms of style, each uses pastoral remains as significant material, deploying the dead as Gothic entities that force the reader to confront America’s darkest social and historical matters.

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”A past that has never been present”: The Literary Experience of Childhood and Nostalgia

Abstract

This essay explores the modernist aesthetic involved in creating a fictive, nostalgic, childhood experience. Evoking the experience of childhood through fiction is as close to actually reliving childhood as we can get. The author argues that it is possible to actually transport the reader into not only the idealized world of childhood, but more so into an embodied experience of childhood through the use of different kinds of narrative and stylistic configurations. In a stylistic and narratological analysis of three modernist novels, Virginia Woolf’s The Waves (1931), Tarjei Vesaas’ The Ice Palace [Is-slottet] (1963) and William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury (1929), the author explores the different ways that literature can create (or re-create) the very experience of childhood through literary style. The strategies involved in establishing a fictive experience of childhood extend from narratological choices such as free indirect style, strict focalization through a child in the narrative (which implies limitations in perception and cognitive abilities, as well as in linguistic terms) to the use of a child-like temporality, the hyperbolic use of phenomena, and an emphasis of the sensorial aspects of perception.

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The Meaning and Functions of the Concept of Yuanfen 缘分 in Contemporary China: A Qualitative Study with Students from East China Normal University

. Ho, and Robert W. Rieber. New York: Praeger, 1988, pp. 263-281 Yao, Shujie, Bin Wu, Fang Su, and Jianling Wang. “The Impact of Higher Education Expansion on Social Justice in China: a Spatial and Inter-temporal Analysis.” In Journal of Contemporary China, 19/67, 2010, pp. 837-854 Zhāng, Héshēng 张和生and Yú Jūnmín 余军民. “Gāokǎo gōngpíng wèntí de shèhuì guīyīn tànxī jí duìcè yánjiū” 高考公平问题的社会归因探析及对策研究 [Analysis of Social Factors Behind the Inequality of China’s National College Entrance Examination and Research of Countermeasures]. In

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