Search Results

11 - 20 of 119 items :

  • "innovation" x
  • Business Management, other x
  • Industrial Chemistry x
Clear All
National innovative performance and sustainable development – the case of Slovakia

a Sustainable Development Goal Index through a Goal Programming Model: The Case of EU-28 Countries. Sustainability, 10(9). Krizanova, A., Masarova, G., Stefanikova, L., & Rypakova, M. (2015). Building a Brand in the Context of Sustainable Development. Proceedings of the 2015 International Conference on Management Engineering and Management Innovation , 3, 79-84. Nagy, J.A., Benedek, J., & Kinga, I. (2018). Measuring Sustainable Development at a Local Level: A Case of a Metropolitan Area in Romania. Sustainability, 10(11), 3962. Nichifor, M

Open access
A digital platform as a facilitator for assessing innovation potential and creating business models: a case study from the i3 project

Heritage. Progress in Cultural Heritage: Documentation, Preservation, and Protection (pp. 364-373) - LECTURE NOTES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Vol 8740 Springer International Publishing ISBN: 978-3-319-13694-3 De Prato, G., Nepelski, D., & Piroli, G. (2015). Innovation radar: identifying innovations and innovators with high potential in ICT FP7, CIP & H2020 projects . Science and Policy Report, Joint Research Centre. Ebrahim, A.S., Rangan, V.K., (2010). The limits of nonprofit impact: a contingency framework for measuring social performance , Harvard Business

Open access
New approaches to customer experience: where disruptive technological innovation meets luxury fashion

Abstract

Consumer behavior is shifting radically with the rise of e-commerce and new technologies. As a result, luxury retailers are forced to embrace a variety of technologies to keep their customers engaged. How do brands captivate shoppers and provide the customer experience that will satisfy their desires? Through dissemination of literature and case studies on examples from the industry, this paper presents a detailed discussion on the new approaches to customer experience in the luxury fashion industry, in the context of a modern economy that is highly shaped by disruptive technological innovations. The discussion includes two detailed case studies, focusing on two key themes that define contemporary customer expectations: the story – discussing customer’s desire to be immersed in the narratives behind catwalk collections, and the experience – discussing the use of technology to create a unique retail space through the use of online and mobile specific technologies. The first case study focuses on how new technologies provide brands with new opportunities to present their products through narratives. Using famous luxury retailers Dior, Givenchy and Prada as examples, the case study provides a detailed discussion on the use of virtual reality and augmented reality as tools that enable customers to project themselves into the story behind a catwalk show and become active characters in the narrative, through the use of technological devices. The second case study focuses on the importance of merging the online and the traditional brick-and-mortar store. “The Store of the Future”, by luxury retailer Farfetch is used as an example of how retailers make use of high-tech equipment, virtual reality and augmented reality not only to create a tech-powered interactive experience that will intrigue customers, but also to improve retail productivity by capturing customer data. The study adopts a qualitative research method to evaluate the validity of the concepts discussed in the Literature Review, using a sample of three in-depth interviews with industry experts, focusing on the use of technology to improve customer experience in physical retail spaces. Based on previously published research, it is estimated that the primary research will indicate that it is not the use of technology that drives the customer experience, but customer expectations that determine the adoption and adaptation of disruptive technologies to satisfy the shoppers’ requirements.

Open access
Key drivers and skills need for innovative companies focused on sustainability

, H. (2009). Stakeholder relations and the persistence of corporate financial performance. Strategic Management Journal , 30 (8), 895-907. Davidescu, A.A., Vass Paul, A.M., Gogonea, R.M., & Zaharia, M. (2015). Evaluating Romanian Eco-Innovation Performances in European Context. Sustainability , 7, 12723–12757. Feniser, C., Burz, G., Mocan, M., Ivascu, L., Gherhes, V., & Otel, C.C. (2017). The Evaluation and Application of the TRIZ Method for Increasing Eco-Innovative Levels in SMEs. Sustainability , 9, 1125. Gauthier, C. (2005). Measuring

Open access
Innovation needs deregulation: the case of taxi and private hire companies

-anaf-a-cerut-uber-o-listacu-toti-utilizatorii-un-sofer-din-capitala-a-incasat-60-000-lei-in-2015-11-03-20 Bosman, R. (2015). Fast Company. Retrieved from Fast Company: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3022028/the-sharing-economy-lacks-a-shareddefinition Biber, E.. Light, S., Ruhl, J.B., Salzman, J. (2017). Regulating Business Innovation as Policy Disruption: From the Model T to Airbnb. Vanderblit Law Review, 70(5), 1561-1626. Credit Suisse. (2015). Global Equity Themes. The Sharing Economy. Retrieved from https://research-doc.creditsuisse.com/docView?document_id=x657090&serialid=%2BoJISdkXI8WqPDLKlKH

Open access
Creative economy and knowledge-based society. Perspectives for Romania

References Buitrago, F., and Duque, I. (2013). The Orange Economy-An infinite oppotunity. New York: Inter-American Development Bank. European Innovation Scoreboard. (2016). Retrieved from http://ec.europa.eu/growth/industry/innovation/facts-figures/scoreboards_en Department for Culture, Media & Sport. (2013). Creative Industries Strategy. Retrieved from https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/productivity-statistics-in-creative-industries-and-tourism-and-leisure-industries . Europe. 2020. (2013). Retrieved from http

Open access
The impact and importance of new technologies in business development in context of economic diversity

/E, Zoetermeer: EIM. Baker, T., Miner, A.S., Eesley, D.T. (2003). Improvising firms: bricolage, account giving and improvisational competencies in the founding process, Research Policy, 32(2), 255-276 Burduş, E (2000). Managementul schimbării organizaţionale. Bucureşti: Economica. Carree, M.A., Thurik, A.R. (1999). Industrial Structure and Economic Growth, in D.B. Audretsch and A.R. Thurik (eds.), Innovation, Industry Evolution and Employment, Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming. Dew, N. et al. (2010). On the

Open access
Intangible assets as “nucleus” of process innovation

References Arundel, A., van de Paal, G., Soete, L. (1995). Innovation Strategies of Europe's Largest Industrial Firms: Results of the PACE Survey for Information Sources, Public Research, Protection of Innovations and Government Programmes, Maastricht: MERIT. Baldwin, C.Y., von Hippel, E. (2011). Modeling a paradigm shift: from producer innovation to user and open collaborative innovation, Organ. Sci. 22 (6), 1399-1417. Bekkers, R., Duysters, G., Verspagen, B. (2002a). Intellectual property rights, strategic

Open access
The strategic role of partnerships between universities and private corporations as a driver for increasing workforce competitiveness in a global economy

, C. (2009). “The Importance of the Knowledge Based Economy”, Annals of the University of Oradea, Economic Sciences, pp. 330 – 336. European University Association, http://www.eua.be/policy-representation/research-innovation-policy/university-business-partnerships . Fatland, A. (2014). “Why Universities and Corporations Need Strategic Partnerships”, https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141110153212-3758357-why-universities-and-corporations-need-strategic-partnerships . Index Mundi, http://www.indexmundi.com/uzbekistan/literacy.html . Larkin, M

Open access
Performance, Trends and Innovations in the Current Trade Sector Context

Abstract

The commercial sector and especially the food trade in Romania have expanded more and more through the medium of hypermarkets-supermarkets, online commerce, etc. thus dominating the market. The turnover and profit they make are significantly increasing, while small and medium-sized businesses in stores and traditional stores lose customers, their market share is diminishing, profitability is low, and they are confronted with big financial problems. Modern trade tends represent almost 60% of Romania’s total market, which means that small shops are losing ground in detriment of others, despite their currently large number at national level. The study, extended over a period of more than 5 years, includes a comparative analysis of the small and medium-sized enterprises in the food commerce sector of Cluj County and the supermarkets-hypermarkets in Romania. Advantages of hypermarkets - supermarkets, online commerce, etc. in relation to small and medium-sized stores are ultimately reflected in the financial performance. Following the selection of 5 financial indicators, considered by the authors to be representative of the trade sector, and their comparative analysis, one can see the economic and financial situation these small and medium retail companies are facing, if they do not change their strategy. Their disappearance from the Romanian market would result in social and economic consequences and the discontent of a segment of the population.

Open access